FBI responds to ACLU FOIA request...with 111 blank pages

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29 Responses to “FBI responds to ACLU FOIA request...with 111 blank pages”

  1. Baldhead says:

    always found releasing documents redacted like this is really a two fingers in your face “fuck you”. I honestly don’t get why anyone at all finds this acceptable. I’d rather be told “we can’t tell you” than get 50 blacked out pages.

  2. Grahamers2002 says:

    ██████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████████

  3. Jake0748 says:

    Whoever made that hand-written note in the upper right corner forgot to cross the T.

  4. John Irvine says:

    I guess I would prefer a redacted document like this to a straight up bald-faced lying denial.  Like the one the administration recently did just this week: yeah right – they’re not building a Death Star.

  5. Lurking_Grue says:

    This may just qualify as performance art now.

  6. jimkirk says:

    Come on, you just have to read between the lines.

    But seriously, I remember a few years ago some group was issued a redacted document like that.  To save paper, it was sent as a PDF.  Someone opened it in an editor and was able to remove the big black rectangles, revealing the original text.  I suppose they’re too clever to make that mistake again…

    • Andrew Singleton says:

      Did anyone check to see if there was any sort of difference between the marked out space and letters or was it just ‘we’re gonna use up /SO/ many black ink cartridges to print big black blobs’?

  7. TacoChuck says:

    I do not even get why it is blacked out, at the top it clearly says unclassified/law enforcement sensitive, which means it is not secret and they can send it out any local yahoo ‘sheriff’ they want who really has no obligation to keep it private, although it is requested they do so.

  8. agonist says:

    It’s all fun & games until you become one of the disappeared. America has deviated greatly from its promise of liberty in the last 12 years.

    • thecactusman17 says:

      The disappeared?

      Name me one person who you have reasonable evidence as having been captured by the FBI/CIA in the US, secretly and without warrant.  Or alternatively, one large scale raid where most or all witnesses were killed to prevent leaks.  It’s REALLY hard, if you haven’t noticed over the last decade and a half of twitter and facebook, to prevent these sorts of things from becoming public.

  9. donovan acree says:

    This article has multiple spelling errors. It’s not FBI. The correct spelling for secret surveillance of citizens is KGB.

    • ExNuke says:

      No, the KGB was shut down, they reopened as the FSB. And it is more properly the КГБ and ФСБ. Of course the faces and methods are the same, only the names were changed.

  10. Larry Vaughn says:

    Likely they are taking all the cellphone data from everyone and storing it, to be used later if they feel a need.

    • ExNuke says:

      Likely they are taking all the cellphone data from everyone and storing it, to be used later when they create an excuse.

  11. Rogelio Descartes says:

    llevenlos a la corte por violacion de la constitucion..

  12. They say it’s to keep track of terrorists, when it’s our government that terrorizes us the most, in violation of our constitutionally protected liberties. Ben Laden, and Al Qaeda win, when our government use them as an excuse to destroy all the freedoms our country was built on.

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