Whale Sushi, and why "maximum sentences" don't often equal actual sentences

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5 Responses to “Whale Sushi, and why "maximum sentences" don't often equal actual sentences”

  1. $19428857 says:

    Gee, I got into a slap fight with another commenter on this very subject on the original thread. Guess I might know what the fuck I’m talking about after all.

  2. Michael Curran says:

    Note that the defendants in this case are pleading guilty as do the vast majority of those charged with federal crimes. Should they not choose plead guilty, their right to a trial by jury is going to cost them around a 33% increase to their sentence on top of whatever additional “enhancements” the prosecutors can dig up. I mean, has anyone working at that organization committed a crime before? Might as well tack a RICO charge on there. Maybe they dig around and check some visas and green cards, maybe a nice little structuring charge for those two $9,500 deposits they made, etc.

    • Guest_whos_coming_to_dinner says:

      “I mean, has anyone working at that organization committed a crime before? Might as well tack a RICO charge on there.”
      I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but you seem to be operating on an understanding of RICO law that’s almost as erroneous as the federal sentencing myths circulating the Internet. 

  3. GawainLavers says:

    THIS PERSON CHARGED OF MINOR CRIMES FACES MORE JAIL TIME THAN YOU’D GET IF YOU BEAT A TODDLER TO DEATH WITH AN UNCONSCIOUS NUN WHILE RAPING A BLIND LIBRARIAN, or words to that effect.

    To be completely fair, that leap occurred in the comments, not in your article.

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