It may be a little late for folks on the East Coast to round up the necessary parts before the blizzard really hits, but this would be a fun trapped-in-the-house project. It's not cheap, but it does give you the opportunity to see how subatomic particles interact with one another in the privacy of your own home. In a post at Scientific American George Musser explains how he put his experiment together. A follow-up promises to show you how to use it, and what he found when he did.

2 Responses to “Build your own quantum entanglement experiment at home”

  1. ymr049c says:

    How they interact in the privacy of your own home.

    Because they’re kind of shy and inhibited out in public, don’t you know.

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