Rape suspect carries stun-gun past TSA checkpoint at JFK airport

Discuss

20 Responses to “Rape suspect carries stun-gun past TSA checkpoint at JFK airport”

  1. mccrum says:

    Sigh.  That’s all I can muster about their incompetence these days.  I hadn’t even heard about the Newark failure mentioned in the story.

  2. eldritch says:

    A few points.

    Firstly, people have already brought loaded firearms and other far more dangerous objects onto planes under the current TSA regime. We know the system is broken, it’s been proven soundly, and this is merely the latest case of screening failure, nothing new or without precedent.

    Secondly, the TSA is not, nor is supposed to be, a replacement for the police. They have no way of knowing who this man is, what crimes he may be sought for, or anything else of that nature. The only task to be reasonably expected of them was screening him for contraband. (Barring situations such as the police specially requesting the TSA’s aide in stopping this man from traveling, et cetera.) Therefor his crimes and modus operandi have no bearing on the performance of their screening duties. Their failure is no worse for his being wanted than it would be if he were a verifiable saint.

    • TooGoodToCheck says:

      That it is nothing new does not make it unworth reporting.  When you stop screaming about the problem, then any problem, no matter how bad, just becomes “how it is” and the impetus to actually fix it evaporates.

    • blueelm says:

      The more we become tolerant of it the worse it will get. So yes, it’s relevant and worth reporting.

    • EH says:

      So your recommended reaction is indifference?

      • eldritch says:

        Actually I make no recommendation of reaction. Neither does BoingBoing or WSJ, for that matter. Odd that I’m held to a higher standard than the journalists.

        A taser making it through security, in and of itself, isn’t newsworthy, and if the intent of the piece is to remark upon the continued failures of the TSA and airport security, the article should instead be structured expressly for that purpose, as an in-depth critical analysis, not as a shock value blurb.

        The article is merely telling us what we already know. “System Still Broken” isn’t a compelling news headline, so they spice it up with the completely unrelated rape allegations to garner larger outrage.

        • Alexandre Isurugi says:

          “The article is merely telling us what we already know. “System Still Broken” isn’t a compelling news headline, so they spice it up with the completely unrelated rape allegations to garner larger outrage.”

          actually I think it’s relevant because he was in fact wanted by the police, so how did he get past security? Don’t they have a system that is linked to a “wanted” list, or a “no fly” list? If no then why not? If yes, then why did he get through?
          And the rapist part, well, I think it stresses the point that this man could be dangerous, and possibly has used the stun gun to attack someone in the past. As opposed to someone who has no criminal record (or not wanted by the police), who carries a stun gun for defensive reasons, but may have forgotten to take it out of the bag.

    • AnthonyC says:

      “They have no way of knowing who this man is.”
      That seems unlikely, given that one of their jobs is to ensure no one on the no fly list, flies, and that they check my ID before I pass through screening.

      • Doesn’t the airline do that?

        • AnthonyC says:

          I don’t know, but I do know that when I b uy my ticket online an dprint the boarding pass at the, the TSA are only ones who ever see my actual, physical ID.

      • eldritch says:

        It’s not like they have dossiers on people. They don’t know WHY someone is on the no-fly list (if they even are), or who that person is. They simply have a list of names that they mechanically check you against. If your name is a close enough match, you are denied.

        Think about airport security checks for a moment. You hand someone your boarding pass and an ID. They check the ID for obvious forgery, and they compare the name to that printed on the boarding pass. THAT’S IT. No database check, no nothing, so long as your ID at least APPEARS genuine and your boarding pass has the same name on it, they don’t care.

        You then pass through the metal detectors and the carry-on screening. Assuming they’re competant or not negligent, they find any obvious contraband there.

        Finally, when you reach your Gate in the terminal, you “check in” for your flight, which can be as uninvolved as handing over your boarding pass to be scanned. If you’re on the No Fly List, this is where you will be dectected, as they scan the boarding pass into their computer systems and they compare it to the list. (Assuming you even got this far, as the computer check can occur before you ever go through security, when you first attempt to get your boarding pass.) If your name is a “match” for one of the names on the list, you are denied access to the plane. There is no further information in the system available to the drones working the desk. Any questions regarding why you are or are not on the list must be taken to management.

        • Alexandre Isurugi says:

          “Finally, when you reach your Gate in the terminal, you “check in” for your flight, which can be as uninvolved as handing over your boarding pass to be scanned. If you’re on the No Fly List, this is where you will be dectected, as they scan the boarding pass into their computer systems and they compare it to the list.”

          don’t they check the “no fly” list before the boarding gate? Don’t they scan your passport at customs? Seeing that this was an international flight, I highly doubt there wasn’t a security check before the boarding gate.

  3. Daemonworks says:

    Well, yes. Nobody has ever accused the TSA of being competent/useful.

  4. Sarge Misfit says:

    Glad it wasn’t pudding (insert sarcasm smiley here)

  5. toobigtofail says:

    “3,800K-volt stun-gun”? Isn’t that like at least an order of magnitude too high?
    No electrons were harmed in the firing of this weapon…

  6. It is incredible that he was able to get through security with the stun gun

  7. Can you imagine if he had a bomb and got through with that instead of a stun gun pretty scary.

Leave a Reply