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Disneyland Dapper Day: when Disney fans dress up


Disneyland fans have created many of their own theme days, some of which I've been lucky enough to happen upon or attend -- Bats Day (goths); Gay Days, and more. But I didn't know about Dapper Day, where 10,000+ people descend on Disneyland and Walt Disney World in natty outfits and style their way through the fun park. Just looking at the official gallery makes me want to mark this in my calendar for next year.

"People are looking for an excuse to dress up," said Justin Jorgensen, who started Dapper Day in 2011 and has organized five of the events, all at Disneyland. The latest Dapper Day — the same Sunday as the Oscars, Hollywood’s own dress-up day — drew an estimated crowd of 10,000 to the Anaheim park and about 1,000 more at Florida's Disney World.

"Everything, including the workplace, pushes this idea of being casual," said Jorgensen, 38, of Burbank. "When do I get to wear my great stuff?"

Most of those in attendance that day were in their 20s and 30s. They had come of age in a time of shoulder-padded power suits, windbreakers in neon colors and frizzy hair — not exactly a time that will be remembered for its classic elegance.

"I think people like history, people love nostalgia," said Heather A. Vaughan, a historian studying 20th century fashions. "People love imagining a time they didn’t live in."

Dapper Day at Disneyland, the nattiest place on Earth [LA Times/Rick Rojas]

(Photo: Christina House)

Songwriting podcast with Richard Sherman of Disney's Sherman Brothers


Sodajerker, a British podcast devoted to songwriting, produced a great one-hour episode with Disney songwriting legend Richard M Sherman, half of the Sherman Brothers team that gave us everything from "It's a Small World" to "Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious" (and lots more). Hearing Sherman talk about his work is fascinating.

As one half of The Sherman Brothers, along with his late brother Robert, Richard M. Sherman is responsible for co-writing the most memorable Disney songs of all time. From the Academy Award winning compositions for Mary Poppins such as ‘A Spoonful of Sugar’, ‘Feed the Birds’, ‘Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious’, ‘Jolly Holiday’, ‘I Love to Laugh’ and ‘Let’s Go Fly a Kite’, to other landmark Disney works such as The Parent Trap, ‘It’s a Small World (After All)’, ‘I Wanna Be Like You’ (The Jungle Book), Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, The Aristocats, Bedknobs and Broomsticks and Winnie the Pooh, the Sherman Brothers have enchanted people of all ages for half a century. In this hour of conversation, Richard M. Sherman joins Simon and Brian to talk through the writing of many of these classics in his own inimitable style.

Episode 38 – Richard M. Sherman

MP3 link

(Image: "it's a small world" holiday, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from harshlight's photostream)

FOUR MORE ASTOUNDING THINGS THAT BOING BOING READERS ARE DOING RIGHT NOW!

Last week, I put up a post asking BB readers to tell us (and each other) about their projects. You-all upvoted your favorites, and herewith presented is a list of some of the coolest things you're up to (there's plenty that didn't make the cut but still fascinate -- have a look).

There's so much awesome here that I'm going to split this into a morning and evening post. Here's this morning's bunch (for an unfiltered view, go read the totally awesome thread for yourself).

First in this batch: Matthew Heberger is translating "Where There is No Doctor" (an amazing book I relied on extensively when I was a volunteer school-builder in Central America) into Bambara for use in Mali:


Mali, in West Africa only has about 1,000 physicians for 14 million people, and has among the world's highest rates of infant mortality and lowest life expectancy. So we got together a group of volunteers to help coordinate the translation of the book "Where There is No Doctor" into Bambara, the country's most widely-spoken language. It is an amazing resource that can literally save lives! http://dokotoro.org/

Read the rest

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LG Monitor Gives New Meaning to Color Precision

This post is sponsored by LG Electronics. Discover the LG IPS Color Prime Monitor.

LG ColorPrime

LG’s ColorPrime IPS LED Monitor is a must-have for anyone who makes a living or has a passion for graphic design, photography video creation, or any other design-related projects. That’s because the 27-inch monitor has 99 percent coverage of Adobe RGB, which is essential if color precision is a key part of your work.  

The picture quality even goes beyond the standard HD that you’re used to. In fact, the built-in Wide Quad High Definition (WQHD) is four times the resolution at 2560 x 1440, ensuring you can see all the detail necessary in everything you view.  

The LG ColorPrime makes multitasking a breeze, too, with it’s one-click 4-Screen Split feature, so you can work on multiple projects at once in various configurations without having to click back and forth.  

Whether you’re laying out design, editing video, or touching up an illustration, you can count on the LG ColorPrime Monitor for supreme color accuracy.  

Editorial board of Journal of Library Administration resigns en masse in honor of Aaron Swartz

The entire editorial board of the Journal of Library Administration resigned en masse. Board member Chris Bourg wrote publicly about the decision, and an open letter elaborates on it, stating that their difference of opinion with publisher Taylor & Francis Group about open access, galvanized by Aaron Swartz's suicide, moved them to quit.

“The Board believes that the licensing terms in the Taylor & Francis author agreement are too restrictive and out-of-step with the expectations of authors in the LIS community.”

“A large and growing number of current and potential authors to JLA have pushed back on the licensing terms included in the Taylor & Francis author agreement. Several authors have refused to publish with the journal under the current licensing terms.”

“Authors find the author agreement unclear and too restrictive and have repeatedly requested some form of Creative Commons license in its place.”

“After much discussion, the only alternative presented by Taylor & Francis tied a less restrictive license to a $2995 per article fee to be paid by the author. As you know, this is not a viable licensing option for authors from the LIS community who are generally not conducting research under large grants.”

Pretty amazing that Taylor & Francis thought that they could convince authors -- who weren't paid in the first place -- to cough up $3000 for the right to use their own work in other contexts. Talk about being out of step with business realities of publishing!

Equality

From the Boing Boing Flickr pool: "Equality," a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivative-Works (2.0) image from Rich Renomeron's photostream.

What problem are we trying to solve in the copyright wars?

My latest Guardian column is "Copyright wars are damaging the health of the internet" and it looks at what we really need from proposed solutions to the copyright wars:

I've sat through more presentations about the way to solve the copyright wars than I've had hot dinners, and all of them has fallen short of the mark. That's because virtually everyone with a solution to the copyright wars is worried about the income of artists, while I'm worried about the health of the internet.

Oh, sure, I worry about the income of artists, too, but that's a secondary concern. After all, practically everyone who ever set out to earn a living from the arts has failed – indeed, a substantial portion of those who try end up losing money in the bargain. That's nothing to do with the internet: the arts are a terrible business, one where the majority of the income accrues to a statistically insignificant fraction of practitioners – a lopsided long tail with a very fat head. I happen to be one of the extremely lucky lotto winners in this strange and improbable field – I support my family with creative work – but I'm not parochial enough to think that my destiny and the destiny of my fellow 0.0000000000000000001 percenters are the real issue here.

What is the real issue here? Put simply, it's the health of the internet.

Copyright wars are damaging the health of the internet

TSA screener finds pepper spray on the floor, gasses five other screeners because he thought it was a laser-pointer


A TSA screener at JFK pepper-sprayed five of his colleagues at Terminal 2 on Tuesday, according to the New York Post. The screener, Chris Yves Dabel, found a pepper-spray cannister on the floor and believed it was a laser-pointer, so (for some reason), he aimed it at five other screeners and pressed the trigger. The six were sent to Jamaica Hospital.

The screener sprayed five other TSA agents around him, sending all six to Jamaica Hospital and halting security checks at Kennedy for at least 15 minutes, police said.

No passengers reported injuries. Dabel refused medical attention.

TSA officials scrambled to keep the embarrassing incident under wraps yesterday — until The Post began inquiring about it, a source said.

Oops, TSA guy goes spray-zy! [NY Post/Josh Margolin]

(via Digg)

(Image: Pepper Spray Cop - White background, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from donkeyhotey's photostream)

Prisoners in Scotland are "watching too much TV"

The parliament's justice committee is concerned that inmates in Scotland's jails "have unlimited opportunity to watch television," and say "a reasonable amount of time to watch television is fair as part of a prisoners' relaxation time," but warns of the importance of establishing "guidelines regarding the appropriate amount of television viewing." [BBC News] Xeni

Mapping Twitter tongues of New York City

8.5 million geolocated tweets.

Above: a map created by James Cheshire, Ed Manley, and John Barratt, who collected 8.5 million geo-located tweets between January 2010 and February 2013.

Fast Company Design reports: "To build the image itself, they placed a point every 50 meters across the city. Tweets falling in close proximity were translated into a grid that you see here."

Among the revelations: Midtown is massively multilingual, "like a someone spilled a jar of confetti across the island."

More: Infographic: The Languages Of New York, Mapped By Tweets

Owner reunited with camera she lost in Hawaii after it washes up on Taiwan beach 6 years later

Lindsay Scallan of Newnan, Georgia took photos on her Canon PowerShot during a vacation on Maui in 2007, and lost her new camera (in its waterproof case) during a night scuba dive. "The seas were really rough. There was a lot of sand stirred up. It was hard to see," she told HawaiiNewsNow. Over the next 6 years, it floated thousands of miles to Taiwan, where an employee of China Airlines discovered the camera on a beach in February, 2013. "The airline asked Hawaii News Now to help find the owner seen in many of the pictures." The story went viral, and Scallan has been reunited with her gadget, and her memories.

[via CNN]

The science of screen time vs. face time, and human connectedness

University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill psych professor Barbara L. Fredrickson had an interesting recent piece in the New York Times on what she and research colleagues argues is a concerning downside of "the instant electronic access" provided by smartphones and tablets and the like: "one measurable toll may be on our biological capacity to connect with other people." The theory isn't new, but the science she points to seems to be. Xeni

HOWTO improve your startup's chances

Anil Dash has got ten dynamite top tips for people hoping to run a successful startup, based on his wide experience:

1. Be raised with access to clean drinking water and sanitation. (Every tech billionaire I've ever spoken to has a toilet!)

2. Try to be born in a region that is politically and militarily stable.

3. Grow up with a family that is as steady and secure as possible.

4. Have access to at least a basic free education in core subjects.

5 Avoid being abused by family members, loved ones, friends or acquaintances during the formative years of your life.

The other five are just as great!

Ten Tips Guaranteed to Improve Your Startup Success

Dolphin funeral? Adult dolphin "carries calf around for days," but is it grieving?

Participants on a "Captain Dave's Dolphin and Whale Watching Safari" off the coast at Dana Point, CA (I've been on a few of them, they're great) witnessed an emotionally moving form of bottlenose dolphin behavior this week: a deceased dolphin calf was being carried around on the back of an adult bottlenose dolphin. To onlookers, it felt like a kind of funeral procession, in the sea.

"I believe this calf has been dead for many days, possibly weeks," said Captain Dave. "You can see the flesh is decaying. In my nearly twenty years on the water whale watching I have never seen this behavior. Nor have I ever seen anything quite as moving as this mother who refuses to let go of her poor calf."

More video, and background, here.

It'd be interesting to hear how marine biologists explain the science behind this apparent mourning behavior. Because it could also be a tasty fermented treat.

[petethomasoutdoors.com via Brian Lam]

Officer linked to torture tapes' destruction advances within C.I.A.

At the New York Times, Mark Mazzetti reports on the promotion of a C.I.A. officer "directly involved in the 2005 decision to destroy interrogation videotapes and who once ran one of the agency’s secret prisons." Xeni