HOWTO turn a dead hard-drive into a cotton candy machine

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14 Responses to “HOWTO turn a dead hard-drive into a cotton candy machine”

  1. Antinous / Moderator says:

    a hard drive that can still power up, a round flat metal tin, six bicycle spokes, an aluminum can and a plastic basin

    Shoot, a fellow could have a pretty good weekend in Vegas with all that stuff

  2. jimkirk says:

    Cool, but getting a mechanism like that balanced so it can spin at 5400 (or even 3600) rpm without ripping itself to pieces sounds tricky.  Add some flaming sterno and, well, I wouldn’t recommend trying that at home.

    A video of it working would be nice to see.

  3. Jeremy LaGant says:

    Here, napalm free: http://www.dinodirect.com/cotton-candy-machines-electric-household.html?vn=RGlub2RpcmVjdEZ1Y2s&AFFID=15&cur=USD&source=sem

  4. timquinn says:

    If you have pre-loaded the hard drive with the proper data the sugary confection contains homeopathic properties. The proper data can cure anything. Be sure you get your data files directly from me and don’t leave them near any electric fields before installing on the disk or the efficacy may be reduced.

    • C W says:

      “If you have pre-loaded the hard drive with the proper data the sugary confection contains homeopathic properties.”

      Yeah right, what hokum!

      Everybody knows that you have to pre-load, then write zeroes to the drive for it to have the proper “memory”.

  5. Grahamers2002 says:

    I’m confused:  Why wait for a hard drive to die?  I seriously don’t think anyone would mind if I pulled out a live drive right now in exchange for the promise of cotton candy!

  6. Eric says:

    Yum. Sanitary.

  7. bill_mcgonigle says:

    “Place it on the spindle”.  I’m assuming the can is screwed down to the spindle here, so the flaming sterno doesn’t go flying away when the drive spins up.  Yet, in one photo it looks like one screw goes in, but in another photo you can see some of the spindle screws not attached. Still, having the fuel rotate in the first place wouldn’t be my first design choice – it’s unnecessary to make the cotton candy.

    This also makes me appreciate the comments threads on Instructables even more.

  8. technogeekagain says:

    The design description seems to be missing a few details, and as others have said I’m not wild about the design even after that’s corrected, but the kluge will work. If you want to be able to say you’ve built a simple cotton candy machine out of computer junk, this will do it.

    On the other hand, if you want something usable and somewhat safe, off-the-shelf consumer machines can be had for $30-$50, and a pro machine runs $500.

    Cotton candy is a very high-profit item — surprisingly little sugar and/or flavoring is used; you’re mostly selling air and energy. The trick is finding someplace where there’ll be enough takers to justify the effort of setting up and running the machine. Alas, these days if I tried to celebrate my birthday by just giving out cotton candy to everyone who walked by I’d probably get arrested for suspicious behavior.

  9. Our robot overlords will surely be merciful for many nanoseconds as they consume this thru their mouth ports.

  10. Gilbert Wham says:

    I first saw this on my phone screen; having now looked at it a bit closer, and figured out how the mechanism ‘works’, I would just like to say, “FUCK, NO ARE YOU INSANE?! GET THAT AWAY FROM ME!!!”

  11. chris dowden says:

    April Fool, perhaps?

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