Huge payouts for disgraced Rutgers coach and boss

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56 Responses to “Huge payouts for disgraced Rutgers coach and boss”

  1. Zoyx says:

    Better make that money last… I don’t see any big paydays for these characters down the line.

  2. yumtacos says:

    OK, but how much is being given to the whistleblower who called out Rice and then got fired for it?

  3. Brainspore says:

    And he gets to KEEP THE IPAD???

  4. Ian MacAllen says:

    In fairness, its Barchi that should resign rather than Pernetti.

  5. You mean the extortionist who wanted $950,000 to not release the tapes? 

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      If the University offered him the money to withhold evidence, it would be a “settlement”. If he asks for it, it’s “extortion”. Doesn’t that seem problematic to you?

      • Boundegar says:

        If you have a heart attack, it’s a medical issue.  If I cause your heart to stop, it’s murder.  Not problematic at all.

        • Antinous / Moderator says:

          False equivalency.  My example is volitional in both cases.  Yours isn’t.

          • Humbabella says:

            I don’t really think it’s about volition, but I do agree there is something ugly about the situation.

            First of all, this was hardly extortion, it was blackmail.  Extortion is when you threaten to harm someone unless they pay you money.  Revealing someone’s misdeeds is not harming them – otherwise witnesses at trials would all be subject to civil suits for saying bad things about the defendants.

            Once we correctly name it blackmail we understand the crime differently.  Extortion can’t really be reversed – if someone is going to hurt me and I tell them I’ll pay them money if they don’t, then I’m not doing anything illegal – they are still the ones who were threatening me in the first place.

            But unlike extortion, blackmail isn’t illegal because of the harm done to the victim of the blackmail.  If you did something terrible that you don’t want other people to find out about, society doesn’t have a great interested in helping you with that.  What we do have an interest in is not allowing to profit from keeping dark secrets.  We’d rather they simply share the dark secret – as eventually happened here. While it isn’t illegal, paying blackmail is pretty close to as bad as asking it.

            That’s what’s so ugly about paying hush money.  Whether the blackmailer or the blackmailee initiates the arrangement, something is being hushed up.

  6. Pernetti is a good dude. He doesn’t deserve to be lumped in with the pyscho gym teacher Rice. 

  7. mtdna says:

    Why do universities do this? Is the calculus that the cost of a wrongful termination lawsuit will probably go over $1M, so they just settle?

    • grimc says:

      A wrongful termination suit might be part of it, but it probably has as much or more to do with donor dollars. If he didn’t resign, he’d drag the school through even more bad press and big donors would hold back their money. A million and change is only a fraction of what Rutgers could lose in donations.

    • Thorzdad says:

      It’s more likely that there is language in the contracts the school negotiated with Pernetti and Rice when they took the jobs. At those pay levels, everything tends to be spelled-out in contracts beforehand, including early termination clauses.

      This is similar to why corporate CEOs can leave their jobs with multi-million-dollar parachutes even after wrecking the company.

  8. theophrastvs says:

    annoying isn’t it?  but there’s a bit more understanding if one directs one’s attention (from “1. 2. 3.”) over the complex plane and adds:

    2+1i:  Lawyers appear alongside all parties

    • the amount is specified in his contract. the lawyers cast “golden parachute of contractual obligation” to avoid having to pay millions in wrongful termination. 

      Also, what the hell are they paying the Athletic Director 400K+ for? The professors don’t make half that.

      • ffabian says:

        Honest question: Is there a realistic chance of him prevailing in court when there is a video where he abuses his students?

        • Depends on whether the judge assents on the category of “abuse”. But IANAL (ha HA!) and I assume that if Rutgers’ lawyers think they’re in danger of firing him without cause, they probably think that his behavior isn’t something that legally nullifies his contract. So yeah, I doubt the video is going to make a difference.

          • ffabian says:

            Are there no inbuilt “failsafes” in US work contracts in case of criminal behavior? 

          • In the eyes of the law, his actions aren’t criminal. 

          • Antinous / Moderator says:

            Are there no inbuilt “failsafes” in US work contracts in case of criminal behavior?

            cf. Lindsay Lohan. You can do what you can get away with based on how much income you generate.

        • theophrastvs says:

          yep. hence the lawyer quip.  y’see none of the parties really want to pull the pin on the legal scene. so ‘lawyers’ (and the press and money) are the real reason one can abuse “amateur” athletes and walk away with a bucket o’ gold.

        • SuperMatt says:

          You must not follow the American “justice” system very closely.

      • jandrese says:

        Well obviously they have to pay that much or the verbally abusive assholes might go to some other program instead. 

      • chgoliz says:

        Men’s sports are the real reason for most colleges and universities. That’s where the big money is.

  9. Brad Gall says:

    1 million more reasons I hate college sports.

  10. Flashman says:

    It should be noted that we’re talking about the 32GB WiFi-only iPad

  11. Harvey says:

    It boggles the mind that organizations don’t write clauses into these contracts forfeiting bonuses and remaining term of contract for conduct embarrassing and damaging to the organization’s brand.

    • Brainspore says:

      If they’d fired him when his behavior was brought to the University’s attention they wouldn’t have been legally obligated to pay him anywhere near as much. As it happens, he gets the money for “sticking it out” the minimum amount of time required by his contract, even though the only thing that changed in between his suspension and his firing was publicity. That’s part of the scandal here.

    • elusis says:

       Oh, they do, but they only apply them to the “little people.”  That’s how I got fired for performing burlesque as a hobby in my off-hours under a stage name when a student found out about it and outed me.

  12. Bradley Robinson says:

    This kind of implies that the athletic director was also throwing basketballs at heads, beating students, and uttering homophobic slurs.  

    To the best of my knowledge, this is not the case.

    • Donald Petersen says:

      Can’t argue with that.  Instead, Pernetti got wind of the abuse and figured suspension was stern enough punishment.  And then the abuse was publicized,  And then it seemed that suspension wasn’t enough, so Rice was “fired” (i.e., cut loose but not “for cause.”  Nobody’s made clear to me why it couldn’t have been for cause, unless a losing season is the only cause that matters in that world, which is of course true.).  And since Pernetti’s gaffe was sooooo embarrassing to the school, he graciously resigned, but continues to get paid for the next two years.  No doubt his replacement needs to get paid, too.  So for screwing up and then leaving to go do something else (or just sit by the pool for as long as he pleases), Pernetti gets paid exactly the same as if he’d never screwed up in the first place.

      No, as far as I can tell he never abused anyone.  Just his position and the trust of the school and all the big bucks foolishly thrown at the school’s athletic program by tiny-brained boosters.

      He may be a different flavor of turd than Rice, but I still wouldn’t want to step in him.

      • Bradley Robinson says:

        And I can’t argue with this.  

        But my point stands.  Mark’s original comment is misleading.  Funny how nobody cares when it is in reference to a different brand of turd, as you suggest.   

  13. cubejockey says:

    As justice for being indentured servants to this douchbag prick coach and his slimy former AD, do present and former players get a chance of whipping a basketball at their skulls as violently as possible?

    • Waine Vines says:

      til I saw the paycheck saying $9881, I didnt believe that…my… sister was like trully taking home money in their spare time at there labtop.. there uncle had bean doing this for only 10 months and a short time ago repayed the dept on their condo and got a great Jaguar XJ. this is where I went……….. ZOO80.ℂom

  14. The jaded cynic in me thinks this happened:
    - whistleblower gets fired
    - whistleblower sends standard ‘wrongful termination’ settlement letter
    - when this blows up in the media, pernetti resigns with a ‘slap on the wrist’ in exchange for backing some story of ‘extortion’

    if the school can push an extortion angle, they push all the bad PR onto a scapegoat.  there’s no reason whatsoever for pernetti or rice to receive golden parachutes — they were egregiously wreckless in performing their duties.

  15. SomeGuyNamedMark says:

    Steal some office supplies or slack off on the job, get fired without so much as a goodbye.  Trash an entire athletic program, ruin a company, etc, get a big fat payday.  Gotta love our system.

    • Humbabella says:

      Be rich = Get rich.

      I’m pretty sure if you were a millionaire with a $400k salary who was found to done some petty theft you’d get your golden handshake.

  16. relawson says:

    It’s just what happens. I’m not even surprised anymore.

    http://www.indystar.com/article/20100924/NEWS14/9240354/IUPUI-fires-basketball-coach-Shann-Hart

    http://a.espncdn.com/ncb/news/2000/0913/740500.html

    Oh, and you don’t even have to make the effort to actually yell and throw things. you could just make phone calls:

    http://sports.espn.go.com/ncb/news/story?id=3243793

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