Nemo, Found.

Welcome home, Nemo!

Today the fine folks at Great Pyrenees Rescue of Northern California placed Nemo in my family. Happily filling the Calliope-sized hole in my heart with this very large, extremely joyful young guy.

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Petition to get a plaque commemorating Isaac Asimov in Philadelphia

Science fiction author Michael Swanwick sez, "In my adopted hometown of Philadelphia there's a move afoot to put up a plaque where Isaac Asimov lived while he was working (and writing seminal Foundation and Robot stories) at the Naval Yard during WWII. Asimov hated Philadelphia while he lived here but came back for the conventions year after year. He gave back. Now it's time to Philadelphia to give back to him. The petition seems to have stalled at 364, 136 short of its goal. This despite the fact that you don't have to be a citizen of Pennsylvania to sign it. I don't want to be a part of a genre that can't give Isaac five hundred signatures. I'm betting the author of 'I, Rowboat,' agrees with me."

Indeed I do, Michael.

(Image: Isaac Asimov painted portrait _DDC4972, a Creative Commons Attribution (2.0) image from home_of_chaos's photostream) Read the rest

Early American tombstone euphemisms for death

In 2008, Caitlin GD Hopkins collected 101 euphemisms for "died" from early American epitaphs. The epitaphs came from tombstones pre-1825, to qualify, the euphemism had to appear in the main text of the tombstone ("Here lies Fred; born 1801, laid himself to rest 1824"), not in the verse below it ("He was a nice guy"). It's quite a list:

Part 1: Died Part 2: Departed This Life Part 3: Deceased Part 4: Entred Apon an Eternal Sabbath of Rest Part 5: Fell a Victim to an Untimely Disease Part 6: Departed This Transitory Life Part 7: Killed by the Fall of a Tree Part 8: Left Us Part 9: Obit Part 10: Slain by the Enemy Part 11: Departed This Stage of Existence Part 12: Went Rejoycing Out of This World Part 13: Submiting Her Self to ye Will of God Part 14: Fell Asleep Part 15: Changed a Fleeting World for an Immortal Rest Part 16: Fell Asleep in the Cradle of Death Part 17: Fell Aslep in Jesus Part 18: Was Still Born Part 19: Innocently Retired Part 20: Expired Part 21: Perished in a Storm Part 22: Departed from This in Hope of a Better Life Part 23: Summoned to Appear Before His Judge Part 24: Liv'd About 2 Hours Part 25: Rose Upon the Horizon of Perfect Endless Day

All 101 of them are linked to photos of the headstones in the actual post:

101 Ways to Say "Died" (via Making Light) Read the rest

Modern Manhunt: FBI, Hive Mind, Boston Bombers

At Wired News' Danger Room, Spencer Ackerman's feature on the technology and crowdsourcing dynamics that allowed law enforcement to identify the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing so rapidly. "Hiding in plain sight was an ocean of data, from torrents of photography to cell-tower information to locals’ memories, waiting to be exploited." [] Read the rest

Canadian police: "al-Qaeda-supported" plot to derail train thwarted

Police in Canada have arrested two men they accuse of conspiring to commit an "al-Qaeda supported" attack that was to derail a passenger train in the Greater Toronto Area. The arrests are the result of cross-border investigation which also involved US law enforcement.

Chiheb Esseghaier, 30, of Montreal, and Raed Jaser, 35, from Toronto, are charged with conspiracy to carry out a terrorist attack and "conspiring to murder persons unknown for the benefit of, at the direction of, or in association with a terrorist group." Read the rest

Watch the latest video posts in the Boing Boing video archive

We've gathered fresh video for you to surf and enjoy on the Boing Boing video page. The latest finds for your viewing pleasure include:

• Hong Kong Disneyland's Mystic Manor. • Filter can separate water from Coke. • Harrison Ford doesn't answer Star Wars questions on Kimmel. • Cop: "Phones can be converted to a weapon. Look it up online." • Vrillon Transmission: 1977 pirate TV message from space alien • The art and science of beer: a video feature on the "Pope of Foam." • World's Strangest Flowers

Boing Boing: Video! Read the rest

Why was the suspected Boston Bomber charged with using a "weapon of mass destruction"?

Writes Spencer Ackerman at Wired's Danger Room: A “weapon of mass destruction” is "a very broad category under federal law. Grenades, mines, missiles and rockets all apply. So do homemade bombs of the sort Tsarnaev allegedly constructed." Read the rest

High density foam rollers for post workout massage

I didn’t know I had knots in my calves, but I did. I spend a lot of time at the computer, and I play some video games, which means that I tense my calves involuntarily and and they get knotted.

When I started working out about a year ago, I hired a trainer. The end of each training session included a massage treatment with a foam roller. That’s when I learned that I had knots, because the roller made my calves feel better.

Its nice if you have someone else to “roll you out,” but you can also put the roller between your calves and the floor and roll yourself back and forth, using your body weight to apply pressure. You can also use it on your back and arms.

It’s also improved the “restless leg syndrome” for two people I know.

I have the 36 inch version, which is bulky. I think the 18 inch version would do just as well. -- Carl Mixon

j/fit Super High Density Foam Rollers: $14 – $35 depending on size Read the rest

Transcript of Boston Bombing suspect's bedside hearing (yes, he was Mirandized)

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, has been charged in a criminal complaint over the bombing of the Boston Marathon. He appeared before a federal magistrate who came to his bedside at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He nodded affirmatively in response to questions, but spoke only one word: "no," after the magistrate asked him if he could afford a lawyer. The New York Times has the transcript. After much controversy, it's good to see that he was read his Miranda Rights. [] And here's the FBI affidavit. [] Read the rest

Let's Bring Digital Liberties into the Big Conversation

Photo: Shutterstock

We've been CISPA'd again.

For a second year the US House has passed the embarrassingly vague Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, a bill that could scatter your personal information like a tornado hitting a trailer park. Echoing last year, the Obama administration has threatened to veto CISPA if it fails to incorporate privacy controls, but we shouldn't have to rely on presidential intervention or the Senate's questionable wisdom to save us. Though Congress is gifted in the arts of incompetence and believes digital liberties only matter to basement-dwelling teens, we cannot entirely vilify the House, either. If there's one thing our representatives actually represent about us, it is our ignorance of technology. Read the rest

Gaiman on the future of publishing: be dandelions!

Neil Gaiman's talk on the future of publishing at the London Book Fair? The Twitters liked it, and I like it too.

Boston Marathon bombing: first-person stories, in audio

The New York Times has a beautiful interactive feature with audio narratives from "some of the people seen near the finish line." What is most striking about the interactive design: as you scroll down the page to listen to each story, you see where each person was in the still image from NBC's broadcast of the race. Powerful. Here's how the Times put it together. Read the rest

Real Stuff - fantastic 90s comic book, serialized on Boing Boing

"The amount of violence and fighting Eichhorn has been involved in is, in itself, astonishing to one such as me. But he is also gifted with a good sense of humor, irony and self criticism, so that he has been able to turn his life experiences into good stories." – Robert Crumb

Gweek 091: Dennis Eichhorn & Real Stuff

Dennis Eichhorn launched the autobiographical comic book, Real Stuff, in 1990. Dennis has had some of the strangest life experiences you can imagine, and he comes across as a person who is adventurous, compassionate, curious, and enjoys laughing at himself. Best of all, he is a terrific storyteller.

Real Stuff is one of my favorite comics of all time, and I have some good news to share. Boing Boing is going to run the amazing stories from the pages of Real Stuff, once a week (Read the first one here). I’m immensely excited that a new audience is going to be able to read Real Stuff on Boing Boing, free of charge. I hope you’ll enjoy reading, or re-reading them.

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Hong Kong Disneyland's Mystic Manor - an RFID/WiFi/electroluminscent driven spook-house for the XXI C.

Hong Kong Disneyland is finally going to get its own Haunted Mansion.

Finnish websites go dark tomorrow to call for copyright reform

As I've written before, Finland has an amazing grassroots legislation system that allows citizens to put any proposal with more than 50,000 popular endorsements to a Parliamentary vote, and the test-case for it is an eminently sensible copyright reform proposal that has been wildly successful. Tomorrow, Finnish websites will go dark and invite their readers to sign the petition, moving the proposal to Parliament.

The proposal addresses this concern by making small scale piracy a fine, at maximum, rather than its current maximum of two years in jail. By moving down the maximum penalty, the Finnish police would be more limited in their investigation methods - they won't be able to spy on citizens online, or confiscate property.

The remaining main points in the proposal include allowing fair use of copyrighted material for teaching and research, and adds fair use rights for parody and satire, which is unclear in the current legislation.

Artists' rights would also be strengthened, allowing artists to license their works through open licenses. Additionally, if a fan of an artist is being proscecuted, then the artist will have the ability to tell their representative organization to stop suing on behalf of their content.

Many decisions involving copyright in Finland are discussed and decided within a Copright Council, which includes representatives from the old media industries, such as the TV and recording industries. The proposal would also add internet operators, software, and gaming industries into that mix, as the scope of copyright expanding all the time.

Finnish Sites Blacking Out Tomorrow In Support Of Copyright Petition [Greg Anderson/Arctic Startup]

Sign the petition [Finns only] Read the rest

World Book Night is tomorrow! (April 23)


Library Lab posted about World Book Night applications a couple of months ago and it's coming up tomorrow. According their website, "World Book Night is an annual celebration dedicated to spreading the love of reading, person to person.  Each year on April 23, tens of thousands of people go out into their communities and give half a million free World Book Night paperbacks to light and non-readers.  In 2012, World Book Night was celebrated in the U.S., the UK, Ireland, and Germany."

This is just a reminder to watch out for rogue book givers in your community. It's called World Book Night, but book giving happens all day on April 23. You might want to keep an eye on @wbnamerica or #WorldBookNight or #WBN2013 to follow the action.

I'm very excited to share my 20 copies of The Phantom Tollbooth via our neighborhood Little Free Library in Silver Lake. If you happen to be in LA, swing by and get one. It's a fantastic book. Read the rest

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