Automated constrained poetry, made from Markov Chains and Project Gutenberg

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10 Responses to “Automated constrained poetry, made from Markov Chains and Project Gutenberg”

  1. Glen Able says:

    Thanks for the code!  I have a load of text from wikipedia sitting around, so thought I’d give it a try.  The tone is a bit different to the Dickens ones – they can start well:
    1 o
    2 my
    3 new
    4 moon
    5 comes
    …but quickly fall apart…
    6 within
    7 unicode
    8 standard
    9 available
    10 ammunition
    11 technicians

    More:
    s is for sale price rising rapidly changing
    o my ass will shake
    o he has five wives became humbled
    o my new body moves inward
    a uk bbc film actor robert carlyle
    i am jin
    o to dig near otego
    o in art film porky
    a dj for very large havana
    o my new rome which proved already accounts attribute
    o of tim from these topics
    o my ass will raise speeds without blocking
    o my leg deep level higher seating
    o on bbc look north indian affairs required pollution
    o by law more synth
    o to the host super league against kasabian

  2. scatterfingers says:

    It would be cool if they could do the same thing with the Fibonacci sequence. 

  3. Paul Thompson says:

    Hi all! I’m the guy that wrote this. I’ve also updated the code so that it creates “Melting Snowballs” where each line shortens by one letter. You can find it here: http://nossidge.tumblr.com/post/49012378444/
    They don’t tend to be as pretty to read as the conventional Snowballs, but I’m sure you chaps can find some good results.

  4. SedanChair says:

    I’d be impressed if each word actually scanned longer than the previous one.

  5. Boomer says:

    From program in my brain:  I am too busy Venus gazing through overcast condition

  6. Cool! I am not a c++ person, but would like to try to generate some of these. How can I do this?

  7. ocschwar says:

    On certain fora in the pre-HTTP Internet, such as the Scary Devil Monastery, there was much resort made to Brick-Texting, and the occasional snowball, which included snowballs were each line could have more than one word. (Monospaced font, and no funny stuff with punctiation.)

    I
    am
    not
    that
    great
    at the 
    artform
    known as
    bricktext
    as you can see, but I did try.

  8. Robert says:

    I ran a Markov generator on the Sherlock Holmes canon, and ended up with a very short story called “With a Cold Sneer upon the Table”:

    http://halfbakedmaker.org/?p=782

  9. nossidge says:

    For those of you who can’t C++, I’ve compiled the code into a EXE file, which should work on Windows 7. You can get it here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/6zba0a3qwfokrmc/Snowball20130428.exe
    It will take input text from a file called “input-raw.txt” which you can fill with whatever text you like. To use the same one that I am using, go here: https://www.dropbox.com/s/792mrvaojl9iyu6/input-raw.txt
    You’ll notice many words that are “xxxxxx” in my text. These are words that I’ve removed because they don’t look great in the resulting poems; things like names and foreign words. The code will ignore any instances of “xxxxxx”.

  10. nemryn says:

    Silly Cory, everyone knows robots can’t write poetry!

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