Nicky Da B "Go Loko": music video, dir. Clayton Cubitt (NSFW, Seizure Warning)

Clayton Cubitt directed this new music video for New Orleans Bounce artist Nicky Da B. He writes,

It's with great pride that I debut "Go Loko," the insanely fun new music video I directed for Nicky Da B. Prepare yourself for machine-gun New Orleans Bounce, twerking latex-clad bunnies, intergalactic booty constellations that would make Carl Sagan cry tears of joy, an asstronaut, a possibly demonic hairless cat, and perhaps my greatest invention yet: The Asscam™.

Turn your volume up and get down! If you love it, click over to the Vimeo page and drop something in the tip jar!

I'm so honored I got to work with next-level genius editor Bob Weisz, who's edited videos for MGMT and The Killers, even though I did have to wait a year while he worked on some little beastly indie film. Related at Boing Boing: "What the Hell is Sissy Bounce?"

23

  1. I’m still partial to Big Freedia, but this was kinda cool. Definitely glad I watched to the end because that Asstronaut was getting tusty with that lunar module.

  2. Lokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokolokoloko…whew. Need to catch my breath.

  3. Well, I gave that a try.  I watched the whole video, and I don’t think this is my thing.  Off to go sample more ‘bounce’ to see how representative of the genre this track is.

    1.  Bounce has been around about 25 years, so it’s hard to say what’s
      “representative”, you could start with old school, often-lyrical jams by
      DJ Jubilee, Cheeky Blakk, PNC, UNLV, Miss Tee or Magnolia Shorty, plus
      early Lil Wayne and Juvenile, or the late 90’s invasion of gay rappers
      like Katey Red, Big Freedia, Sissy Nobby and a thousand others, to the
      stuff that’s coming up now with harder, faster beats to match the
      ever-younger crowd of dancers.
      Nicky Da B is representative of that
      newer sound, but he also raps lyrically and works with electronic music
      producers like Diplo. As even newer rappers come out (and there are many
      already, but they can’t tour cuz they’re like 7 years old) they’ll be
      part of the shift to the next style.
      Bounce is a culture, not a
      genre, so it develops across time and reflects the desires of the people
      (the party people :)) of New Orleans primarily. As it grows beyond the
      city, it’ll change again. Some people here in Nola are excited about
      that, but some people are a little more protective.
      As a
      recommendation, the best time to listen to Bounce is when you just need
      to move your body around and shake off the bullshit life deals out.
      It’s party music, is what I’m trying to say :)

  4. Bounce has been around about 25 years, so it’s hard to say what’s “representative”.
    You could start with old school, often-lyrical jams by DJ Jubilee, Cheeky Blakk, PNC, UNLV, Miss Tee or Magnolia Shorty, plus early Lil Wayne and Juvenile, or the late 90’s invasion of gay rappers like Katey Red, Big Freedia, Sissy Nobby and a thousand others, to the stuff that’s coming up now with harder, faster beats to match the ever-younger crowd of dancers.
    Nicky Da B is representative of that newer sound, but he also raps lyrically and works with electronic music producers like Diplo. As even newer rappers come out (and there are many already, but they can’t tour cuz they’re like 7 years old) they’ll be part of the shift to the next style.
    Bounce is a culture, not a genre, so it develops across time and reflects the desires of the people (the party people :)) of New Orleans primarily. As it grows beyond the city, it’ll change again. Some people here in Nola are excited about that, but some people are a little more protective.
    As a recommendation, the best time to listen to Bounce is when you just need to move your body around and shake off the bullshit life deals out.
    It’s party music, is what I’m trying to say :)

  5. Nicky Da B is too fucking dope.  I can’t not make my ass clap clap when I listen to him.

  6. His lyrical style wasn’t what I was prepared for when he identified as a rapper, he seems to be singing more than rapping.  Maybe it just isn’t hip-hop, but is still rap?  

    Either way, very in-your-face and catchy and fun.  Well worth watching (and re-watching)

  7. I think his “Express Yourself” with Diplo is much better but this was still interesting.  Da B is Da bomb.

  8. Well, it´s not going in my playlist but it´s undeniably fun and the video is highly appropriate for the music. The ass-galaxy is a nice touch.

  9. Ass. Ass! ASSSSS! Love that ASSSSSS!!!! Gimme some fuckin ASSSSSSSS!!!!!!!!

    Sigh. 

    I guess even gay rappers can’t get away from treating women like meat.

    1. When a gay Bounce rapper tells anyone to do anything with their ass it’s instructional, and meant for the edification of the dancers. The way a coach would tell an athlete to hustle. They’re not interested in women sexually and aren’t asserting themselves towards women in an objectifying manner. (Unless gazing upon the beauty of a person with amazing talent is objectification.)
      Don’t mistake Bounce in it’s current form for 2 Live Crew era hetero-dominated female objectification. I’ve seen plenty of gay rappers go into the crowd to physically “educate and extricate” audience members who are offending or disrupting dancers with unwanted sexual energy.
      Like most dancing, and sports, and sex itself, Bounce is an outlet for physical energy and self expression.  It’s not inherently bad (or even sexual) just cuz it involves the human body (no matter the social taboo on that particular part), and as such it is important to note that gay rappers aren’t claiming ownership over the dancers or encouraging them to do something they don’t want to do.
      They’re just making a safe (enough) space for them to do it to the best of their ability.

      (As an aside, there are more men Bounce dancing in this video than women. 2:1 by my count)

Comments are closed.