"Revenge porn"-style fraudsters target sex offenders

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23 Responses to “"Revenge porn"-style fraudsters target sex offenders”

  1. Mike Hawkins says:

    Were the designation “sex offender” not broken, and teenagers who were drunk and urinated publically, homeless, mentally ill people who exposed themselves without understanding the consequences, and people who perpetrated sex crimes when they were young children victim to the label, I would be totally okay with this.

    • Above post is actually mine– accidentally posted from my partner’s account.

    •  So, you’re saying it’s ok to extort in certain circumstances defined by you? I pray you never wind up on the wrong side of some else’s definition.

    • nachoproblem says:

      I would be okay with everything if it only happened to people who deserved it.

    • Gulliver says:

      Some real gems in that article:

      Among the hundreds of thousands of names that appear, the websites include names and addresses of people who never have been arrested or convicted of a sex crime.

      The name, address and phone number of Rodrick’s estranged wife, Lois Flynn, appear on SORArchives, Offendex and Onlinedetective. Flynn, who has been involved in a protracted divorce case with Rodrick, never has been convicted of a crime.

      “The ex wife of one of the administrators of this website seem to be on a crusade to smear the name of this website,” according to a post, which goes on to accuse her of infidelity and alcohol abuse. “This pretty much speaks for itself. We will post more information as we find time.”

      Flynn, the mother of Rodrick’s two children, denies abusing alcohol or having an extramarital affair.

      In Louisiana, a schoolteacher bought a house owned by a convicted sex offender whose name was removed from all official registries in 2009. Even after being notified that the offender no longer lived in the house and being paid to remove the profile, Offendex and SORArchives continued publishing the woman’s address as if the sex offender still resided there.

      Those who have challenged the websites say they and their families have been subjected to harassment that includes having personal phone numbers, addresses and photographs of family and friends published on the sex-offender websites.

      Grainger, 36, of Great Falls, Mont., said his family has been under siege for almost a year. He said Rodrick and Oesterblad threatened him in a series of e-mails and sent him a photograph of his own infant son to punctuate their demands.

      Still think the problem here is the broken designation of “sex offender”…or an extortion ring being run by convicted fraudsters and racketeers? These criminals aren’t even the bottom of the barrel. They’re the scum growing under the bottom of the barrel of society. They just found a niche the police and courts won’t even touch with their usual ten-meter pole of bureaucratic runaround. Notice how all the complaints to the various authorities seem to just get…lost. Your tax dollars at work, folks.

    • Gilbert Wham says:

       Oh, grow up.

    • devinull says:

      I’d like to quote from the article…. “the websites include names and addresses of people who never habe been arrested or convicted of a sex crime.”

      You see, a sex offender registry maintained by a county government has some accountability, whereas a private corporation generally has only the accountability of suitors able to raise and maintain a successful legal action…. and like most other emerging forms of legal trollery, the defendants in this instance only aired in miscalculating their ‘target market’, that is, making the mistake of bullying individuals with the rare largesse to commence legal aciton.

      I hope these people get hit with slander and defamation lawsuits. But ultimately, the scam will continue….

  2. anon0mouse says:

    “In Virginia, a man last year stumbled onto the Offendex profile of his recently deceased brother-in-law. He said he contacted the website in an effort to spare his sister and her two young daughters from learning about the 18-year-old conviction. But when he said he balked at paying, the websites posted his name and e-mail. They also posted his sister’s address, her name and the names of her children, in-laws and other relatives.”

    Nothing remotely noble about this extortion racket.  It is criminal and despicable no matter how unsympathetic the targets may be.  If you want to punish sex-offenders more harshly, do it directly and in a way that benefits society and prevents future harm.  These guys are just more bottom feeders.

    • Boundegar says:

      The surprising part is they expect paroled sex offenders to have any money. As often as not, they end up homeless. Nobody will hire them, and most places have laws forbidding them from living just about anywhere. As noted above, this is the same whether one is serial rapist or a urinating frat boy.

  3. nachoproblem says:

    So I always thought revenge porn (and this) pretty much fit the textbook definition of extortion and are illegal everywhere. Is there any argument that I’m somehow missing?

    • Daemonworks says:

       While legally entitled to the same level of protection as everyone else, in reality people nobody cares about are pretty much fair game, never mind folks that most people actively dislike.

  4. euansmith says:

    How come the people running this website are not under arrest? Even if the details they were publishing were of bonafide sex offenders, it would still be extortion. 

    • Gilbert Wham says:

      Easy: they’ve slipped under the radar and ended up in the ‘content-provider, do not prosecute’ file and therefore can avoid RICO charges just like the two big ‘M’s do…

      • euansmith says:

         I guess that only leaves recourse to the Supreme Court of Baseball Bat.

        • L_Mariachi says:

          Exactly. I don’t think targeting criminals — some of whom may be violent, most of whom have not much left to lose — is a wise business strategy. “You know what I did to that innocent kid? What do you think I’m going to do to the likes of you?

          • euansmith says:

             This is screaming out for a horror movie franchise, “You know what I did last Summer!”

  5. EtherealOne says:

    I was under the impressions that there already is a government provided list for this sort of thing?

  6. That_Anonymous_Coward says:

    Pick a target not likely to have sympathy.
    Demand cash or else.
    Make their lives hell either way.
    Go after anyone who dares challenge you…
     

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