Jean Stapleton (Edith Bunker), RIP

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52 Responses to “Jean Stapleton (Edith Bunker), RIP”

  1. unclemike says:

    Big bucket o’ win, that one. 

  2. mindysan33 says:

    That’s sad news…. A true slice of Americana, that show…  

    • Antinous / Moderator says:

      Can you imagine trying to get it on the air now?

      • noah says:

        It (or a modernized version of it) would definitely fit in on a few of the cable channels. I think Louis C.K.’s first series, Lucky Louie, on HBO, had a lot in common with All in the Family…  it was almost an homage in some respects.

        Not on network, though.

      • SomeGuyNamedMark says:

        Not only would it be too honest for today but the studio execs would insist on making the daughter one of the Kardashians.

      • mindysan33 says:

         Maybe, but it wouldn’t make sense now. It would have to have a different set of issues to work through. I think that was Lear’s goal, was to work through some of the issues that came along with the tail end of the Civil Rights movement, the black revolt, and the youth revolt. How were some more conservative whites dealing with this challenge to their privilege? I don’t know what the modern equivalent would be… Muslims in America?

        • millie fink says:

          The anti-black prison-industrial complex?

        • Funk Daddy says:

          The modern equivalent would be a show about how some more conservative whites are dealing with the current challenges to their privilege. 

          In Canada we call it Question Period and most viewers are hoping for some serious plot twists soon because ratings are way down.

        • rattypilgrim says:

           I think we’re still dealing with the same set of issues in that the sons and grandsons of Archie Bunker are still singing the same tune…”those were the days” of white, Christian, male, supremacy and privilege.

      • rattypilgrim says:

         Looking back,  American ’70′s television was really a great time in many respects. It was pay back time for the McCarthy era and society had made enough forward strides that the public in general was not threatened or intimidated by programs like “All in the Family” and its spin-offs. Even the Mary Tyler Moore Show introduced single working women to America even though they’ve been here since forever on their parents’ farms and in urban industrial areas and during shortages of labor during wars.

        But that was then and this is now, the era of total corporate/political dumbing down, devide and conquer, hate filled, fearful, loveless America.

    • dr says:

      Although of course it was a fairly close copy of a British show.

  3. chgoliz says:

    Those were the days.

  4. Noddy93 says:

    All In The Family gave us The Jeffersons and  Maude and through Maude, Good Times. Those were all shows that had something to say.

    Jean Stapleton was a national treasure.

    • rocketpj says:

       No reflection on Jean Stapledon, but the next logical misstep in that train was Golden Girls, which we all could have done without.

      • DrNobelDynamite says:

        “…Golden Girls, which we all could have done without…”
        Crazy talk.  

      • mindysan33 says:

        Um… really? No. Now, that spin off of Golden Girls, empty nest… meh. But Golden Girls was AWESOME SAUCE!!!  4 older women, living independently, dealing with the issues of the day… I think maybe the problem was that by the late 80s, that format was really waning and so it seemed dated in some ways. Especially given that Cosby and Roseanne were on around this time. 

      • Noddy93 says:

        Your logic fails.
        Golden Girls was not a spin-off of Maude.

        • Antinous / Moderator says:

          But Starship Troopers was a spin-off of Golden Girls.

        • rocketpj says:

           Not a spinoff, a descendent.  And I stand by my revulsion at the show.

          • mindysan33 says:

            Seriously, what annoyed you so much – the fact it’s about women, older women, older women who sometimes enjoyed themselves with or without men, or the often times somewhat stilted comedy? What’s so terrible about it? Look deep into your self and tell us. We are all dying to know.

          • marilove says:

            Have you ever actually sat down to watch a show?  And you’ve yet to to describe why it’s a show that we shouldn’t like, but I have a damn good feeling it’s because OMG OLD LADIES!!!!!!

          • rocketpj says:

            I found the comedy predictable, poorly written and somewhat boring.  And yet it went on and on and on. 

            Picture it, a show that repeated the same formula endlessly, and found passionate defenders decades afterwards.

            That said, I have no issue with other people liking it.  I like lots of things that other people don’t like. 

          • marilove says:

            bah, disqus is being weird. duplicate deleted.

          • marilove says:

            @rocketpj:disqus Oh, you really have no issue with other people liking it? Hmm.
            “which we all could have done without.”
            Who is this “we” you are referring to? I think you’re the only one with this opinion, man, sorry to say. :/

            Also, predictable? It was perhaps one of the most ground-breaking shows ever, and touched on things most shows wouldn’t have even *dared* to touch on — today or now.

            It was/is a sitcom.  It followed a pretty standard sitcom formula, as nearly all sitcoms do.  I think perhaps you just probably don’t like sitcoms.  Which is fine, but…

            Considering the Golden Girls continues to be one of the top-rated shows of all time including re-runs to this day, I have to say, I think you’re full of it. ;)

          • welcomeabored says:

            Please don’t feed the feminist trolls.  They *can* and *will* take comments in which a woman or women are featured here  personally, and then write long retorts for your failure to be supportive.  Why BB?  Because the community is mostly male and inevitably they will use a word or two that *could* be interpreted as misogynist.  It won’t matter that you didn’t mean it that way; trolls are opportunists, that feed on inflammatory language  — like the word ‘revulsion’.   Clearly, they think, you have a problem with (older) women, and they have a problem with your alleged problem.

            Although BB tends to be one of the most liberal-minded bunch of commenters in the blogosphere, it isn’t liberal enough for all the trolls determined to ‘get their mad on’, so tread lightly or expect to do a lot of deleting in your email. 

    • Just_Ok says:

      Also, Checking In, Gloria, Archie Bunker’s Place and 704 Hauser

    • SomeGuyNamedMark says:

       The episode where Sammy Davis visits, that alone justified the show.

      • Noddy93 says:

         the episode that got me as a child was when Archie hung the US flag over a swastika that was painted on his front door… and a boy scout came by to tell him that he’d hung it incorrectly.

    • Funk Daddy says:

      I went to my room and cried when John Amos character in Good Times, James Evans Sr, died.

  5. The video link, for those who can’t get it to play: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0d8FTPv955I

  6. tyger11 says:

    Watch your head, Dingbat.

  7. PickledBeatnik says:

    Those were the days. R.I.P, Jean.

  8. Alan Olsen says:

    I remember her in Cold Turkey. She has a bunch of funny bits throughout the movie. (Especially when she is freaking out while needing a cigarette.)

  9. Scratcheee says:

    Here’s the answer to a question I had for years: “Gee our old LaSalle ran great.”

  10. Daneel says:

    No mention of Till Death Us Do Part? 

  11. BarBarSeven says:

    This scene from Archie Bunker’s place seems apt. R.I.P. Edith. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UKrAYD3zX8

  12. Actually, I was surprised she was still alive until hearing of her recent death — I honestly thought she had died decades ago and that the death of her character Edith on the show was a case of real life writing the plot.

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