Bid on the spy-rock that Lockheed and the DoD stiffed a subcontractor on

Gregory Perry says he got stiffed by Lockheed Martin. He says they asked a company he co-owned to develop a fake spy-rock for the Department of Defense in the early 2000s, but didn't pay the company, whereupon he got screwed by his partners, and shafted by Lockheed on the royalties they owed him on the spy-rocks they made later for America's spooks. He's been listing it on eBay (along with the Lockheed/DoD paperwork), looking for the millions he believes he's owed.

In the late '90s, Perry worked for NETSEC Inc, a contractor that installed firewalls and did intrusion detection for EOUSA. (His employment by NETSEC was confirmed to Mother Jones by Zal Azmi, former chief information officer for EOUSA and the FBI.) Then, in 2002, Perry was hired by a subcontractor called Advanced Wireless Automation (AWA), where he owned a 10 percent founder's share of the company. The subcontractor's shining product was the RockCam, which is either a video camera with a lot of batteries or a high-tech piece of surveillance equipment, depending on who you ask. Perry says that RockCams—which on the outside, look like rocks—contain devices capable of sending encrypted information via 900 MHz radio to a main communication hub. According to the eBay listing, each high-resolution image and video is tagged with geographic coordinates, and the rock also contains environmental hardware, "such as temperature and humidity sensors for sampling weather-related data from the area." The batteries last for three years. Here is a picture of the technology:

Former Military Contractor Tries to Sell Secret Surveillance Rock on eBay for $10 Million [Dana Liebelson/Mother Jones]

(Thanks, Mike!)