Running a stop sign results in multiple police-ordered anal probes

Good times in New Mexico, courtesy a police department high on the war on drugs:

Eckert's attorney, Shannon Kennedy, said in an interview with KOB that after law enforcement asked him to step out of the vehicle, he appeared to be clenching his buttocks. Law enforcement thought that was probable cause to suspect that Eckert was hiding narcotics in his anal cavity. While officers detained Eckert, they secured a search warrant from a judge that allowed for an anal cavity search.

The lawsuit claims that Deming Police tried taking Eckert to an emergency room in Deming, but a doctor there refused to perform the anal cavity search citing it was "unethical."

But physicians at the Gila Regional Medical Center in Silver City agreed to perform the procedure and a few hours later, Eckert was admitted.

While there...

1. Eckert's abdominal area was x-rayed; no narcotics were found.

2. Doctors then performed an exam of Eckert's anus with their fingers; no narcotics were found.

3. Doctors performed a second exam of Eckert's anus with their fingers; no narcotics were found.

4. Doctors penetrated Eckert's anus to insert an enema. Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and police officers. Eckert watched as doctors searched his stool. No narcotics were found.

5. Doctors penetrated Eckert's anus to insert an enema a second time. Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and police officers. Eckert watched as doctors searched his stool. No narcotics were found.

6. Doctors penetrated Eckert's anus to insert an enema a third time. Eckert was forced to defecate in front of doctors and police officers. Eckert watched as doctors searched his stool. No narcotics were found.

7. Doctors then x-rayed Eckert again; no narcotics were found.

8. Doctors prepared Eckert for surgery, sedated him, and then performed a colonoscopy where a scope with a camera was inserted into Eckert's anus, rectum, colon, and large intestines. No narcotics were found.

Don't Appear to Be Clenching Your Buttocks When Pulled Over For Not Coming to a Complete Stop or Be Tortured by Doctors: America, This is Your War on Drugs

Notable Replies

  1. I just...what in the....what? So all of these thought processes had to occur:

    1. Cop: "That guy looks a little clenchy. Could be gas, but better try to get a warrant to look in his ass."
    2. Judge: "You want a warrant to search someone's anus for a traffic stop? Maybe multiple medical procedures? Yeah, that seems reasonable."
    3. Doctors and nurses: "You want me to perform multiple enemas and then an invasive medical procedure against someone's will, and also for no medical reason? Yeah, sure, the Hippocratic oath probably covers that."
  2. Hmmm, your credulity is looking a bit clenched there...

  3. They sedated him and gave him a colonoscopy? e.g. they pumped him full of narcotics in order to search for ... narcotics? Oh, America 💕

  4. It is so inconsiderate of citizens to stand on their rights, when a few minutes of cooperation with a "voluntary" search would be so much easier for all concerned. And, as we all know, insisting on your rights constitutes "baiting" a police officer, so don't go crying about any extrajudicial punishment you may receive for it.

    I'm proud to be an American, where at least I know I'm free

  5. I'm an ER doctor working in a relatively small town in New Mexico, and I can attest that the police try this far more often than most people know about. The police recently brought us a patient from jail who they suspected of having crammed some drugs into her vagina and they came to us and ordered us to do a pelvic exam to find the drugs. The patient did not want a pelvic exam and she had no abdominal pain or anything wrong with her. We politely informed the police that what they were trying to order us to do was called "Sexual assault" and it was both immoral and highly illegal for them to ask us to do it. There is a procedure in place in the jail system for inmates to have a body cavity search, but the police where I work want to try and get it done without the proper paperwork needed so they wouldn't have to go to a judge and prove any probable cause. The police got angry with us, but we rightfully refused their order. On the way out, one police officer was overheard by one of our nurses to say something along the lines of "We'll remember this next time they call us for help with a violent drunk with a knife." At which point, the nurse called the police department, where she had a relative on the force, and reported him. Later on, the hospital lawyers got involved and they fully backed us up in the ER.

    Police officers bringing in people and ordering the doctors to perform certain tests happens very frequently, and they are always angry when we refuse to perform any test that is not medically indicated. I once had a group of 4 police officers bring me a 5 year old child who threw a fit in school, and insisted that he was a dangerous person an demanded that I do a drug test on him. I instead, gave the child a box lunch and told the police to bring him back to school and have the teacher handle his temper tantrums rather than dragging the kid off in restraints.

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