Autism and the Neurodiversity Acceptance Movement: writer Steve Silberman, profiled

Boing Boing pal Steve Silberman first wrote about the high number of autism cases in Silicon Valley in 2001, for this Wired feature. In 2015, his past 13 years of research into that subjet will be published in the book Neurotribes: Thinking Smarter About People Who Think Differently.
Metroactive.com profiles Steve:
The volume will look at the two prevailing views of autism that have competed for public attention and resources: one that sees it as a psychiatric disability, and another that recognizes it as a form of human variation with its own distinctive strengths, customs and culture.
"A Different State of Mind: Embracing Autism, Asperger's and Intellectual Diversity in Silicon Valley," by Jennifer Wadsworth (metroactive.com)

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  1. renoun says:

    I've got Seattle area acquaintances involved in autism and developmental psychology research that seem to think that there's a disproportionate number of autistic kids in the Redmond, Wa. area. They postulate that the aspy people of the nation are meeting and breeding.

  2. Sam Smith, a journalist in Washington DC, has written about this phenom in politics. In Washington DC they are breeding, or they are just rewarding the types of behaviors associated...

    http://prorev.com/autistic.htm

  3. Or maybe enjoying planned families.

  4. Ethel says:

    Flip, we have a disproportionate rate in my own church. Most do marry and reproduce, in my experience they also have pretty enduring marriages with high fidelity - the world wasn't watching at the time and just thought they were pocket protected lab geeks. Which they were (go Dad!). If you know what you are looking at you will be surprised at the prevalence, it gets more interesting when you mix culture with a different brain.

  5. "one that sees it as a psychiatric disability, and another that recognizes it as a form of human variation with its own distinctive strengths, customs and culture."

    As somebody who has it, it's often both.

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