Pretty portraits of periodical cicadas

Alex Wild: "Brood III periodical cicadas during the 2014 emergence. Panther Creek State Conservation Area, Illinois, USA."


Alex Wild: "Brood III periodical cicadas during the 2014 emergence. Panther Creek State Conservation Area, Illinois, USA."

Photographer Alex Wild captured the lovely image of a periodical cicada above, one of many available as prints on his website.

"The red compound eyes of this cicada identify it as a Magicicada periodical cicada. Allerton Park, Illinois, USA"


"The red compound eyes of this cicada identify it as a Magicicada periodical cicada. Allerton Park, Illinois, USA"

Eastern North America is host to an astonishing entomological phenomenon found nowhere else in the world. Cicadas in the genus Magicicada spend 17 years (or, more rarely, 13 years) maturing underground before emerging en masse to mate. These emergences take place in May or June and involve several species, each with a different song. The odd, long intervals between mass emergences is thought to confound predators and overwhelm their appetites when they occur. For more information about these fascinating animals, visit Magicicada.org.

In recognition of the current emergence of Brood III in Iowa, Illinois, and Missouri, all prints in this gallery are on sale at 70% off regular pricing until June 30, 2014.

More images here.

"Portrait of a periodical cicada, Magicicada cassini. Panther Creek State Conservation Area, Illinois, USA."

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