Yaruvi: A necropolis for the Dead Sea


You'd bring your dead to it on a boat, bear the body through a ceremonial labyrinth and the body lifted to the rooftop, exposed to the elements.


The concept design will likely never be built, but it's a bold way of thinking about honoring the dead, designed by Miró Rivera. The floating structure is "a place where any person -- regardless of nationality, race, religion, age or affluence -- can be laid to rest."

The Dead Sea Necropolis of the Future [Order of the Good Death]

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  1. Hah. "Without regard to nationality or affluence," just as long as they're affluent enough to leave their trade for several days and drive/fly out to the Dead Sea.

    I figured the vultures were part of the deal? I mean, you don't return your body to nature by just sort of mystically sublimating it into the air.

  2. As I understand it a traditional Tibetan sky burial includes having your body ritually hacked up for the convenience of the birds. In the videos I've seen they used axes.

    Native American and Zoroastrian style funeral exposures do not require dismemberment, though.

    I would be happy to have any of the three, or even simply to be just buried without embalming or encapsulation. I am totally skeeved by the idea of my body becoming air pollution, fly ash, or toxic sludge after my death. Gives me the willies. I want to remain in the living cycle.

  3. Cremation also 'mystically sublimates' a shitload of noxious exhaust pollution from the cremator fuel. To me it's like saying "nothing in nature is going to eat of me, and I'm going to help spew out some crap as I go.
    I read an article once, years ago about a 'Forest of the Dead'. Basically you lower your beloved in a cardboard or wicker coffin, then plant a tree on top. An excellent use both of land and the dead methinks.
    Why is this not commonplace?

  4. "It is every citizen's final duty to go into the tanks, and become one with all the people."

    --Chairman Sheng-ji Yang, "Ethics for Tomorrow"

  5. I read an article once, years ago about a 'Forest of the Dead'. Basically you lower your beloved in a cardboard or wicker coffin, then plant a tree on top. An excellent use both of land and the dead methinks.
    Why is this not commonplace?

    Because it's insufficiently lucrative for the vendors, and because of a neurotic craving for pseudo-immortality among customers.

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