Business lessons from "pirates, hackers, gangsters and other informal entrepreneurs"

Amidst all the business books lionizing the likes of Steve Jobs (while minimizing his start as a blue-box peddling criminal) comes The Misfit Economy, a history of the business-practices of "pirates, hackers, gangsters and other informal entrepreneurs."

Who are the greatest innovators in the world? You're probably thinking Steve Jobs, Thomas Edison, Henry Ford. The usual suspects.

This book isn't about them. It's about people you've never heard of. It's about people who are just as innovative, entrepreneurial, and visionary as the Jobses, Edisons, and Fords of the world, except they're not in Silicon Valley. They're in the street markets of Sao Paulo and Guangzhou, the rubbish dumps of Lagos, the flooded coastal towns of Thailand. They are pirates, slum dwellers, computer hackers, dissidents, and inner city gang members.

Across the globe, diverse innovators operating in the black, grey, and informal economies are developing solutions to a myriad of challenges. Far from being "deviant entrepreneurs" that pose threats to our social and economic stability, these innovators display remarkable ingenuity, pioneering original methods and practices that we can learn from and apply to move formal markets.

The Misfit Economy: Lessons in Creativity from Pirates, Hackers, Gangsters and Other Informal Entrepreneurs [Alexa Clay and Kyra Maya Phillips/Simon and Schuster]

(via Kottke)

Notable Replies

  1. So we want the business types to get lessons from criminals? and we thought we had problems before...

  2. Sounds awesome, thanks for the heads up!

  3. Many things are crimes, without being intrinsically wrong - just because some politico says so.

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