Minecraft schools edition in beta testing

An educational edition of hit game/toy/epic/religion Minecraft is in beta testing, reports The Verge, and teachers are invited to get their hands on it early.
Minecraft: Education Edition is almost identical to standard Minecraft, but it includes a handful of features designed for the classroom. A couple smaller features were announced in January — like an in-game camera for taking screenshots — and some more substantial ones are being announced today. That includes adding in-game chalkboards that can display large blocks of text and letting teachers place characters that'll say things when a student walks up to them.

The biggest new feature won't come until September, when the game launches. It's called Classroom Mode, and it's essentially a control panel for teachers. Teachers will be able to use the interface to grant resources to students, view where everyone is on a map, send chat messages, and teleport people to specific places, which will be useful should students run off or get lost.

Classroom mode alone looks great for improving multiplayer in general:

MC_EE_ClassroomMode.0

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  1. This sounds pretty good- a company responding to the off-book use of Minecraft in education. So that's good.
    I keep trying to get into the game, and I keep feeling like I'm missing something. Maybe it's because I'm a thirty (mumble mumble) year old man and I'm not the target audience, but I just end up missing the pull.
    I dunno.
    I do keep poking my kids to try it, but it hasn't started resonating with them yet, either.

  2. I'm a 46yo woman and I love Minecraft. I think it's too bad it's got labelled a kid's game -- the relatively low level of gore and violence means it is suitable for kids, but it's more "all ages".

    I play in survival mode, but focus on building up a safe environment. I think there's great opportunities to meditate on culture itself in it, and how traditions get built up from the local environment.

    I've wound up researching ancient cities like Petra to get ideas for how to build. It's been really rewarding.

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