"Patrick Farley"

Zbrush meets the Monster Manual

Patrick Farley, a wonderful comics creator whose work we've been covering for more than a decade, has taken to Twitter to show off his Zbrush recreations of the monsters from the original Dungeons and Dragons Monster Manual. (Thanks, Stefan!) Read the rest

Patrick Farley reboots Cloverfield

The great (and maddeningly erratic) Patrick Farley has a typically awesome new comic up: "Cloverfield Rebooted," in which the monster's true nature is revealed.

Cloverfield Rebooted (via JWZ) Read the rest

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Patrick Farley vows to return to webcomics

Hurrah! Patrick Farley, creator of the genius abandonware webcomic Electric Sheep, is back on the job and promising to continue the series. But first he needs to raise $6,000 on Kickstarter to take the time off to work on it.

Electric_Sheep Reloaded (Thanks, Dawn!) Previously:Patrick Farley sums up the Bush Era: "All Circuses and No Bread ... Apocamon 3 is out, and $0.25 The Guy I Almost Was. New "Spiders" comic episode online Read the rest

Flowcharting the gay marriage debate

Patrick "E-Sheep" Farley, one of the great (and frustratingly irregular) webcomics creators, has a sharp editorial cartoon up -- a flowchart explaining the gay marriage debate.

Graphical Overview of Same Sex Marriage Debate, v. 1.3 (via Warren Ellis) Previously:Patrick Farley sums up the Bush Era: "All Circuses and No Bread ... Thoughtcrime Experiments: Remixable, CC-licensed science fiction ... E-sheep creator on how anti-war activists are characterized ... Stefan sez: "Sick little monkey - Boing Boing New "Spiders" comic episode online - Boing Boing Read the rest

Thoughtcrime Experiments: Remixable, CC-licensed science fiction anthology

Sumana sez, "Sumana Harihareswara and Leonard Richardson selected nine mind-squibbling SF and fantasy stories from the slush pile, commissioned five works of art, paid the authors and artists, and packaged the whole thing as a high-quality anthology that you're free to copy and remix. Artists include E-Sheep's Patrick Farley and fanfic darling Erin Ptah; authors include Mary Anne Mohanraj, Carole Lanham, and Ken Liu. We also wrote an essay describing the process, which you can read if you're interested in how we did it or what the SF/fantasy market looks like from the editor's perspective."

Thoughtcrime Experiments (Thanks, Sumana!) Read the rest

Patrick Farley sums up the Bush Era: "All Circuses and No Bread

As Stefan says, "This is breathtaking."
"Trying to explain what was wrong with the Bush Era feels like trying to vomit up a cannonball. I don't think my jaw can stretch that wide.

Seriously, where does one even begin? Abu Ghraib? Ahmed Chalabi? Mission Accomplished? The "Battle of Iraq?" Valerie Plame? No-bid contracts? The billions of dollars the Pentagon can't account for, and apparently never will? The Department of Justice firings? The blue Iraqi flag? The staged press conference? The fake Thanksgiving turkey? Terry Schiavo? Freedom Fries?

I can at least say this for Bush: he *didn't* plant any WMDs in Iraq.

But really, Bush himself wasn't the problem. Bush was a cipher, the perfect vacuum at the center of a perfect storm -- an ideological superstorm which rotated, like some slow, sick, wobbling hurricane of raw sewage over America for 8 years, like some brown, shitty version of Jupiter's Great Red Spot. This Neo-Conservative Superstorm, as I'll call it, had three major sources of energy feeding it:

a) a panicked population in need of a Protective Patriarch,

b) a Republican party crowded with brazen and reckless ideologues,

and most significantly:

c) A network of Conservative Think Tanks with deep pockets and a fearsomely coordinated army of media pundits."

And it goes on.

Patrick Farley sums up the Bush Era: "All Circuses and No Bread" Read the rest

Mini-Sensors for "Military Omniscience"

Defensetech's Noah Shachtman says,
Spotting insurgents, sorting out friend from foe -- it's beyond tough in today's guerilla war zones. So tough, that no single monitor can be counted on to handle the job. The Pentagon's answer: build a set of palm-sized, networked sensors that can be scattered around, and work together to "detect, classify, localize, and track dismounted combatants under foliage and in urban environments." It's part of a larger Defense Department effort to establish "military omniscience" -- and "ubiquitous monitoring."
Link to blog post with photos.

Reader comment: Josh Winters says,

In the realm of 'Sci-Fi is now,' check out Patrick Farley's 'Spiders' online comic about an alternate war in an alternate Afghanistan: Link. Mini-sensors that network in realtime to provide military omniscience? How . . . novel.
Read the rest

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E-sheep creator on how anti-war activists are characterized

Patrick Farley -- brilliant creator of e-sheep, The Spiders, The Guy I Almost Was, and other wonderful, thought-provoking genre cartoons -- has posted a great prose piece, a parable about the characterization of anti-war activists. Link Discuss (Thanks, Pat!) Read the rest

New e-sheep comic

Stefan sez: "Eeeyah! Patrick Farley quit his day job and is starting a weekly strip about the long-ago era of Dot-Com San Francisco. Episode One is up now. (Strong language. Not for Grandma.)"

This is the e-sheep/Spiders/Guy I Almost Was guy, my favorite web-toonist of all, a king-hell science fiction writer and a sharp artist to boot, and what's more, he's solid nerdc0re, with a great understanding of the net and all it means. Link Discuss (Thanks, Stefan!) Read the rest

R.U. Sirius interview in Shift

Mondo 2000 founding editor is interviewed in Shift.
S: Have you ever read Patrick Farley’s e-sheep comic? He did this one, this autobiographical comic, where there’s this guy, a parody of you... What he tells the main character, the autobiographical character, is that you made up all the stuff for your magazine.

RU: Actually, I say that all the time in public interviews, "We made it all up." Which in a sense is true -- some of it we made up and some of it we didn’t. Mondo 2000 clearly wasn’t journalism in the conventional sense. It was mostly composed of interviews, very subjective, really dedicated to people speaking in their own voice. It was very playful and very surrealistic. I never really wanted to do journalism -- I do now because I have to to make a living. And we do it at Thresher, I guess because it’s become a habit now. To say we made it all up is kind of flippant, but we weren’t concerned with responsibility or credibility. We were more concerned with creating a sense of excitement and energy and a sense of belonging to the next wave of culture. And we were concerned with making people laugh.

Link Discuss Read the rest

Stefan sez: "Sick little monkey

Stefan sez: "Sick little monkey Patrick Farley has finally released "Apocamon," an manga-style adaptation of the Book of the Apocalypse." Link Read the rest