"jeri ellsworth"

castAR 3D projection glasses off to a good start on Kickstarter

Launched just hours ago on Kickstarter, the castAR virtual reality headset has already received over $300k and will reach its goal of $400k very soon. It was developed by Jeri Ellsworth and Rick Johnson. Below, Jeri tells the story of the making of the castAR.

The castAR system was developed by Jeri Ellsworth and Rick Johnson over the last 18months. It allows multiple users to see holographic like images projected from each users glasses, which appear to be locked to the environment. High speed and accurate head tracking allows the computer to render graphics from the correct perspective for each viewer.
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Commodore 64 keytar weilded by rollerskating hacker

Legendary hardware hacker Jeri Ellsworth (world's most awesome C64 hacker and all round happy mutant), entertained attendees at the Maker Faire with her brilliant Commodore 64 bass keytar, which she played while wearing rollerskates.

Ellsworth noted via Twitter that it uses the SID chip and is based on an FPGA - a re-implementation of the Commodore-64 computer using reconfigurable logic chips. See the video below for an overview of the instrument from Ellsworth.

What’s not obvious from the photo above is that Ellsworth wears a portable amp and rocks the C64 Bass Guitar on roller skates.

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How to make a spike-knuckled butyl rubber glove wired to discharge a disposable camera flash cap across the spikes

[Video Link] Sean Michael Ragan says:

Responding to criticisms that their new no-trolling-allowed policy lacks teeth, Hack a Day writer Jack Buffington threw down the gauntlet Monday, announcing that, henceforth, anyone leaving a nasty comment about one of Jeri Ellsworth’s projects will receive a visit from the Pain Fairy. He even showed interested readers how to build the Pain Fairy’s weapon of choice, viz. a spike-knuckled black butyl rubber glove wired to discharge a disposable camera flash cap across the spikes.

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Misogyny is alive and well in technology circles

Geek heroine Jeri Ellsworth put up a YouTube video explaining how she might build a $10 version of the $5000 audible turn warning system recently installed on Portland public busses. In the comments, someone posting as "peterbartek" (the name of the CEO of TranCert Marketing, the company that installed the $5,000 systems under discussion) told Ellsworth that her video had "set back the progress of women 100 years" by criticizing the company's products. Peterbartek went on to talk in detail about the company's products and the complexities in designing "mitigating devices."

But when Ellsworth's supporters called Peter Bartek to task for telling her that she had betrayed her gender by criticizing his products (one Ellsworth Twitter follower wrote ""@peterbartek The only way Jeri Ellsworth could set back women 100 years would be by developing a time machine in her guest room."), Bartek claimed that his YouTube account had been hacked, disclaimed all responsibility for the discussion, and then stopped answering emails altogether.

Phil Torrone at Make is skeptical of this story about hackers, and instead believes that Bartek was engaging in the long engineering tradition of crapping on women for being women:

When people ask me (or my partner, a female engineer) why we don't see as many women posting their projects, or participating as much online in the engineering community, we usually give specific examples instead of speculating "why?" Here's a good example that really got us upset (TriMet's talking buses, YouTube, sexism, online imposters: It's complicated By Joseph Rose, The Oregonian).
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NES built into a purse

Jeri Ellsworth created this remarkable Commodore-64-emulated-NES-in-a-handbag -- she's also the hacker who reverse-engineered the Commodore 64 and came up with the C64-on-a-chip design.

Jeri's nifty Nintendo/C64 purse (via Neatorama) Read the rest

Make: Talk 006 -- Jeri Ellsworth, Friday, April 16, 2009 at noon PDT

In this episode of Make: Talk, we'll be joined by Jeri Ellsworth, a pinball fanatic and hardware hacker. You might remember her as the chip designer who Easter egged a Commodore 64 emulator in a video game joystick. We'll also present some news from the world of making, and our favorite tricks, tips, and tools of the week. Be sure to call in for prizes that we'll award during the program! The number is (646) 915-8698.

Below is the show player, where you can listen to the live program on Friday, and to past episodes.

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