Boing Boing 

Cory Doctorow

I write books. My latest are: a YA graphic novel called In Real Life (with Jen Wang); a nonfiction book about the arts and the Internet called Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age (with introductions by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer) and a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

The science of vaccine denial

The only real scientific mystery about vaccines is why so many people buy into the deadly pseudoscience of vaccine denial and put their kids -- and yours -- at risk of catching ancient, vanquished, deadly diseases.

Read the rest

Don't argue about vaccination with Rob Schneider if you value your sanity

California Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez made the mistake of returning actor Rob Schneider's deranged anti-vaxx phonecalls and lived to tell the tale: "That is 20 minutes of my life I'll never get back arguing that vaccines don't cause autism with Deuce Bigalow, male gigolo."

Yahoo's security boss faces down NSA director over crypto ban


During Monday's Cybersecurity for a New America conference in DC, Yahoo's Chief Information Security Officer Alex Stamos stood up and had an intense verbal showdown with NSA director Mike Rogers about the NSA's plan to ban working crypto, in which the nation's top spook fumfuhed and fumbled to explain how this idea isn't totally insane.

Read the rest

Big Content publishes a love-letter to TPP

The secretive, corrupt, illegitimate Trans-Pacific Partnership would bind its members -- including the USA and Canada -- to criminalize file-sharing, putting people in jail for watching TV the wrong way, and that's just fine with the copyright lobbyist group Global Intellectual Property Center.

Read the rest

Beautiful imaginary Hungarian money


Barbara BernĂ¡t designed a series of fanciful Hungarian euro notes for her MA project at the University of West Hungary.

Read the rest

Laura Poitras's Citizenfour OPSEC


One of the most startling motifs of Citizenfour, Laura Poitras's Academy Award-winning documentary about Edward Snowden, is the use and abuse of cryptographic tools, which are at the center of the NSA's surveillance plans and Snowden's audacious act of whistleblowing.

Read the rest

Chicago Police Department maintains "black site" for illegal detention and torture

Homan Square is the Chicago Police Department's "secure site" where people as young as 15 are detained without charge and without access to counsel, subject to beatings that result in head wounds, and, in one case, death.

Read the rest

HSBC boss used tax havens to keep underlings from discovering his outrageous pay


HSBC CEO Stuart Gulliver admitted that he used two secretive banks -- one in Switzerland, the other in Panama -- not just to avoid taxes, but to hide his amazing compensation package from other HSBC bankers, lest they wax jealous.

Read the rest

$10,000 robot leggings


In 2009, Balenciaga rolled out "Transformer" leggings: made to order, from non-precious metals, at $100,000 per.

Read the rest

Huge trove of surveillance leaks coming

Al Jazeera and The Guardian are set to publish "the Spy Cables," a massive trove of South African intelligence cables detailing the over-classification of information and the corruption of post-Apartheid South Africa by US political interference.

Read the rest

Children perform Zeppelin!

The Louisville Leopard Percussionists, featuring children from 7-12, perform Led Zeppelin's Kashmir, The Ocean, and Immigrant Song, on marimbas, xylophone, vibraphone, drum set, timbales, congas, bongos and piano. (via Making Light)

Nebula nominees announced

The Science Fiction Writers of America have announced this year's Nebula Award Nominees, as selected by the professonals in its membership.

Read the rest

Philip K Dick on Disneyland, reality and science fiction (1978)


Here's an excellent, rambling PKD riff on the relationship of Disneyland to science fiction (and Episcopalianism) and what is, and is not, real.

Read the rest

The Tory war on science in Canada: a chronology

Nine years of cuts; muzzlings; bad science, retaliatory firings, burned libraries, layoffs, closed investigations, censorship, withdrawal from international accords;

Read the rest

EFF: Here's how to fix patents in America

Two years in the making, Defend Innovation is a whitepaper by Electronic Frontier Foundation attorneys, setting out a program for fixing America's horribly busted patent system.

Read the rest

Horrifying knit goods


Brooklyn's Knitrocious creates nightmarish knit goods, such as the goat balaclava and the horror clown balaclava.

Read the rest

Citizenfour takes Oscar for Best Documentary

Citizenfour, Laura Poitras's brilliant documentary about Edward Snowden, won the Best Documentary Academy Award last night!

Read the rest

Jews vs zombies and aliens vs sexual abuse


Lavie Tidhar writes, "Jews vs Zombies and Jews vs Aliens will be published as e-book originals on March 19th, and are currently available for pre-orders (a limited paperback will follow)."

Read the rest

Links: Superfish is everywhere; social media sucks at jihad; breathtaking copyfraud; Florida jail records attorney/client conversations

Read the rest

Borderlands Books will stay open, thanks to cash from supporters


The store had been slated to close after San Francisco's new minimum wage law tipped it from marginal (due to high rents, competition from Amazon) to unprofitable, but after a meeting with customers, the owners decided to offer $100 "memberships" to make up the shortfall.

Read the rest

Padded messenger bag disguised as a huge leatherbound hardcover


It's from Thinkgeek, and includes a removable internal pad/divider/organizer, fits 15" laptops, and has an internal zippered compartment, $50.

Revenge porn shitweasel pleads guilty, admits he hacked victims' accounts


Michael from Muckrock writes, "After months of legal wrangling, Hunter Moore, who ran 'revenge porn' website Isanyoneup, has agreed to a plea deal that will see him serve a minimum of two years and up to seven years in jail, as well as up to $500,000 in fines."

Read the rest

An Internet of Things that do what they're told


California's phone bricking bill seems to have reduced thefts in the short run, but at the cost of giving dirty cops and wily criminals the power to wipe-and-brick your phone at will.

Read the rest

Canada's new surveillance bill eliminates any pretense of privacy


Michael Geist writes, "Canada's proposed anti-terrorism legislation is currently being debated in the House of Commons, with the government already serving notice that it plans to limit debate. That decision has enormous privacy consequences, since the bill effectively creates a 'total information awareness' approach that represents a radical shift away from our traditional understanding of public sector privacy protection."

Read the rest

Links: Jail bosses who steal from workers; realistic online mental health quiz; RCMP classes "anti-petroleum" activists as terrorists; Lenovo thought you'd love that spyware!


Read the rest

I'll Vote Green If You Do: electoral kickstarter for minority parties

The UK Green Party has built a version of the kickstarter for elections I proposed last year: they're signing up people who promise to vote Green if enough of their neighbours will do the same.

Read the rest

Livestream: students occupy Newark school superintendent's office to protest forced privatization

Greg Costikyan writes, "Newark public school students have occupied the office of Cami Anderson, the state-appointed superintendent of Newark's public school system, in protest against plans to privatize the entire city school system over the protest of the city's mayor and virtually its entire population."

Read the rest

Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution leaders haunted by dirty-trick harassment campaigns


From following their grandchildren around at kindergarten to hanging slanderous banners outside their homes to hacking their email to sending funeral wreaths to their doors, the leaders of Hong Kong's anticorruption Occupy Central movement face persistent, ongoing reprisals for their political activity.

Read the rest

Telegraph's lead political writer resigns because of censorship of criticism of advertisers, especially HSBC

Peter Osborne was the head political writer at the Telegraph, a rock-ribbed conservative paper owned by the shadowy Barclay brothers; he quit after seeing the paper soft-pedal and downplay scandals involving its major advertisers, and broke his silence once he learned that the paper had squashed stories of illegal tax-avoidance schemes run by HSBC.

Read the rest

Fair use: a guide for artists

Pat from American University's Center for Media and Social Impact writes, "Can an artist use images from Facebook in her collage? Can an art teacher show pictures he took at an exhibition in class? Can a museum put a collection online?"

Read the rest