Cory Doctorow

I write books. My latest are: a YA graphic novel called In Real Life (with Jen Wang); a nonfiction book about the arts and the Internet called Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age (with introductions by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer) and a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

New Agatha H novel out today, capturing the action from Girl Genius webcomic


Carol writes, "The next installment in the Girl Genius prose novel series is out! Agatha H. and Voice of the Castle brings Agatha to her family's ancestral home, a sentient castle whose intelligence has become fragmented."

Read the rest

Bumfights creator accused of stealing remains of dead children from Thai hospital museum


Johann writes, "One of the creators of notorious millennial website Bumfights has is accused of stealing preserved child body parts and flayed tattoos from the notorious Bangkok Black museum at the medical faculty of Siriraj Hospital. Then he attempted to DHL his swag back to the States, he has now fled to Cambodia."

Read the rest

New sf story: "Huxleyed into the Full Orwell"


​Huxleyed Into the Full Orwell is a new short story I wrote for Vice Magazine's just-launched science fiction section Terraform, which also has new stories up by Claire Evans, Bruce Sterling, and Adam Rothstein.

Read the rest

Phish's concept concert based on Disney's "Chilling, Thrilling Sounds of the Haunted House"

For Halloween, rock group Phish traditionally creates a 'musical costume' by covering a classic album from music history. This year, the band created a new set of music based around the 1964 Disneyland album Chilling, Thrilling Sounds of the Haunted House. Interesting set of music with a cool stage design, the band uses the original narration and inspiration for the songs."

It makes for quite a concept album, to rival Kilroy Was Here and 2112.

Superheroes and sf characters in Dutch Renaissance style


Sacha Goldberger's "Super Flemish" series is a spectacular set of images of superheroes, sf movie characters and other futuristic figures (including some of his notorious aged superheroes) in the garb and affect of Dutch Renaissance portraits. (via Neatorama)

Driving a legobot with a simulated worm nervous-system

More news from the Openworm project, whose Kickstarter I posted in April: they've sequenced the connectome of all 302 neurons in a C. Elegans worm, simulated them in software, and put them to work driving a Lego robot.

Read the rest

Sailor Moon hip-flask


The 8 oz stainless steel flasks are $27.50 and sport an etched Sailor Moon logo -- they come with a free funnel that the seller will etch with your name (or, presumably, any other pithy thing) at no added charge.

London council threatens freedom of information site for "leaking" info they say doesn't exist

A reader writes sez, "Can you leak a decision that has not yet been made? The local council at the London Borough of Enfield seem to think so, and sent a takedown notice to British Freedom of Information website WhatDoTheyKnow.com run by the non-profit mySociety."

Read the rest

Rudy Rucker and Terry Bisson's "Where the Lost Things Are"


It's a hell of an sf story, about the advent of a life-extension drug and the ensuing ghettos of "geezers" who live on the margins of society, marching towards 100 and higher, avoiding armed teen vigilantes -- and the parallel world they discover.

Read the rest

GOP set up Twitter "numbers stations" to get around Super PAC rules

Super PACs are allowed to raise unlimited funds to support election campaigns, but can't coordinate with those campaigns; this especially means that campaigns can't share expensive private poll data with PACs to help fine tune their campaigns -- which is exactly what Republicans did with their cryptic, unlabelled Twitter accounts that acted as dead-drops with messages like "CA-40/43-44/49-44/44-50/36-44/49-10/16/14-52-->49/476-10s" to let affiliated PACs know what the polls had shown.

Read the rest

Plush Minecraft blocks


The 20cm^3 plush Minecraft TNT block is covered in suede-effect polyester and stuffed with soft foam; for something less explosive, try the Chest or the Log (or get the 10cm set with Grass, TNT, Diamond and Creeper blocks).

(via Geeky Merch)

R2D2 measuring cup set (legs become measuring spoons!)


The $20 R2D2 measuring cup set decomposes into four measuring cups and his legs turn into four measuring spoons.

This set of R2-D2 Measuring Cups disassembles into 4 measuring cups plus 4 measuring spoons and reassembles in a snap (fortunately, it's not as complicated as C-3PO). Each has its measurement written inside so you can't forget what they are and handles on the back that don't distract from R2's aesthetic. The only problem we can foresee with these is that if you show somebody else your R2-D2 Measuring Cups, you may have to install a restraining bolt to keep them from wandering off.

R2D2 measuring cup set

(via Bonnie Burton)

What "the worst ride in Disney World" teaches us about media strategy


Foxxfurr's latest article on Disney theme park history is yet another amazing and insightful read that uses the tenth anniversary of Stitch's Great Escape ("the worst ride in Disney World") as a jumping-off point to show how the history of theme-parks, animation, the elusive 5-12 year old boy market, and the entertainment business all influenced one another.

Read the rest

Mesmerizing rebuild of a mechanical Fourier calculator

Albert Michelson's harmonic analyzer -- a 19th century mechanical calculator that can do Fourier analysis with just gears, springs and levers -- was found at the University of Illinois, and then lovingly restored by a trio of makers who lavishly documented it in a book (free PDF/paperback/hardcover) and a mesmerizing video series.

Albert Michelson's Harmonic Analyzer: A Visual Tour of a Nineteenth Century Machine that Performs Fourier Analysis [Book]

Albert Michelson's Harmonic Analyzer [Youtube]

Albert Michelson's Harmonic Analyzer (book details) [Free PDF]

(via JWZ)

Band releases unplayable glass-master disc with entire catalog


Claire from the band Yacht sends us their newest project, Where Does This Disco?: "Among other things, it's a clear unplayable CD (without foil) containing our entire musical catalogue. It's also a microsite built to explain what it's like to be a band trying to design and sell physical media in an age where compact discs are both obsolete and still somehow ubiquitous."

Read the rest