Boing Boing 

Cory Doctorow

I write books. My latest are: a YA graphic novel called In Real Life (with Jen Wang); a nonfiction book about the arts and the Internet called Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age (with introductions by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer) and a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

Snowbirds' guide to avoiding corrupt cops on I-75

My parents just got back from a road-trip from Toronto to Florida, and used Dave Hunter's venerable Along Interstate-75 to find food and lodgings, pass the hours, and beat the speed-traps and civil forfeiture nightmares of America's great roadways.

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Is a reputation economy really an economy?


Kevin Simler's 2013 essay on the economics of social status is a great, enduring Sunday sort of longread that should be required of anyone contemplating using the phrase "reputation economy" in polite society.

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Imaginary ISIS attack on Louisiana and the twitterbots who loved it


Gilad Lotan has spotted some pretty sophisticated fake-news generation, possibly from Russia, and possibly related to my weird, larval twitterbots, aimed at convincing you that ISIS had blown up a Louisiana chemical factory.

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An online community that deletes itself once it's indexed by Google


Unindexed is an online community that anyone can contribute to; it runs a back-end process that continuously scours Google for signs that it has been indexed, and securely erases itself once it discovers evidence of same.

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One-handed bottle opener preserves caps for your collection


The Gropener is a one-handed bottle-opener designed to lift off caps without bending them (to preserve them for your collection); the anodized aluminium body has a rare-earth magnet to keep the cap from falling after it's removed.

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Astounding RC flying with counterrotating drive

Barry writes, "There's a thing called pattern flying, where pilots compete to perfectly execute an elaborate set of compulsory tricks."

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Bondic: multipurpose liquid UV-curing plastic adhesive

Bondic is a UV-curing liquid plastic adhesive that can stick together materials that usually require different kinds of glues to bond.

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Improving the estimate of US police killings


Patrick Ball and the Human Rights Data Analysis Group applied the same statistical rigor that he uses in estimating the scale of atrocities and genocides for Truth and Reconciliation panels in countries like Syria and Guatemala to the problem of estimating killing by US cops, and came up with horrific conclusions.

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What's up with these incredibly prolific twitterbots?


Old, highly-retweeted tweets in which I was @'ed keep getting RT'ed by fake twitterbots whose profile photos, bios and names are randomly composited from other Twitter users; they follow each other and spawn at an alarming rate.

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Hartford, CT says friends can't room together unless some of them are servants


Eric writes, "In Hartford, eight adults and three children live in a 6,000-square-foot, nine-bedroom brick mansion --they're longtime friends who pooled money into one bank account, share monthly expenses, take turns cooking dinner and cleaning and consider themselves a family.

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Judge who invented Ferguson's debtor's prisons owes $170K in tax


Judge Ronald J Brockmeyer -- who filled Ferguson's coffers by fining its poorest residents and sent them to inhumane, overcrowded prisons when they couldn't pay a few hundred dollars -- stands accused of fixing fines for his cronies, and owes $170K in unpaid taxes.

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Albuquerque PD encrypts videos before releasing them in records request

Har-har-fuck-you, said Albequerque's murderous, lawless police department, as they fulfilled a records request from Gail Martin, whose husband was killed by them, by sending her encrypted CDs with the relevant videos, then refusing to give her the passwords.

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Kelly Link talks about her new short story collection


David writes, "Whenever I ask guests of Between The Covers who their touchstone writers are, nobody is more often mentioned than Kelly Link. We talk (MP3) doppelgangers, rorschach tests, finding one's authentic mask, Basho, Buffy, weird writing rituals, and about her latest (and perhaps greatest) new collection Get in Trouble."

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DMCA abuser ordered to pay $25K to WordPress

Straight Pride UK, a homophobic organization, used a fraudulent copyright complaint to censor an article about them, but WordPress fought back.

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Vaping hoodie with mouthpiece in the drawstring


Vaprwear has a vaping chamber in the central pocket that feeds smoke out through the drawstring around the hood; they cost about $100 each, in a variety of styles. No word on washing instructions.

Finnish millionaire gets EUR54K speeding ticket

Finland has progressive fines for driving offenses, so the more you earn, the more you pay.

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William Gibson on fashion


William Gibson is the only science fiction writer I know of with his name on a line of exclusive couture repro military clothes from a Japanese company.

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THIS TOOK FOREVER

A truer-words-never-spoken woven label to sew into your crafting projects. (via Making Light)

Justice Department issues "scorching" report on Ferguson's Police Department


The police department "routinely" blocks citizens from recording their activities under a bizarre rubric of "officer safety," according to the Justice Department's investigation.

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Bullshit copyright complaint is the perfect pretense to censor CT library art


Peter from the National Coalition Against Censorship writes, "A Connecticut library took down a painting of Mother Teresa because of a dodgy copyright claim. Was that really the issue?"

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Greatest hits of customer aviation complaints to the DoT


Michael from Muckrock writes, "Last July, MuckRock user Curtis Raye requested all aviation consumer complaints in the categories of 'customer service' and 'discrimination' made to the Department of Transportation in March and April of 2014."

Matt Haughey retires from Metafilter


After 16 years behind the wheel of Metafilter, Matt Haughey is stepping down.

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Trolls abuse Canadian copyright law with fraudulent mass-scale extortion notices


Michael Geist writes, "The launch of the Canadian copyright notice system earlier this year raised serious concerns as Rightscorp, a U.S.-based anti-piracy company, sent notices that misstated Canadian law and demanded that users pay to settle claims."

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Net Neutrality victory lap: Grumpy Cat banner flown over Comcast HQ

Evan sez, "Last week, the Internet scored a historic victory for free speech when the FCC voted in favor of strong net neutrality protections that keep goliath telecom companies like Comcast from messing with the Internet."

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David Gerrold's Doctor Who versus Star Trek comic


When Steve Davidson from the rebooted Amazing Stories heard that David "Trouble With Tribbles" Gerrold had written a comic book script for a parody in which Doctor Who appeared on the Starship Enterprise (TOS edition), he knew he had to publish it.

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Interactive tour of nuclear arsenals since WWII

Explore how many nukes there are in the world, and where they are, courtesy of the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists' interactive Nuclear Notebook -- a useful way to discover whether some friendly superpower has stashed nukes in your harbour.

Creative science journal, including the science of Wookiees


Dave Ng writes, "The Science Creative Quarterly is pleased to release its first volume of both a print offering of collected works, AND the much vaulted Annals of Praetachoral Mechanics."

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Audiobook of Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town


Blackstone has adapted my 2005 urban fantasy novel Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town for audiobook, narrated by Bronson Pinchot, who does a stunning job.

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Links: Wyoming loves asset forfeiture; XOXO is back; acrobatic tea; beautiful campstove; anti-NN shilltoons; Big Pizza's lobbyists; acrobatic tea; frozen bar


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The book thieves of 1990s London


In the 1990s, London was home to notorious book-thieves who stole to order for the shops of Charing Cross road, who paid a fraction of cover-price for them -- meaning that each thief would have to steal £50,000/year worth of books (and often stole more).

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