Boing Boing 

Cory Doctorow

I write books. My latest are: a YA graphic novel called In Real Life (with Jen Wang); a nonfiction book about the arts and the Internet called Information Doesn't Want to Be Free: Laws for the Internet Age (with introductions by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer) and a YA science fiction novel called Homeland (it's the sequel to Little Brother). I speak all over the place and I tweet and tumble, too.

Kinetic clockwork sculptures

Brett Dickins (previously, previously) writes, "This compilation features five of my mechanical artworks -- I chose five sculptures all featuring gears and mechanisms that are radically different from each other in design and function."

Fair Use App: a guide to fair use for online video creators

Art from New Media Rights writes, "We spend our time working with online video creators on fair use, so we created The Fair Use App. We filtered down our experiences working with video creators to create an app that can help them better understand:"

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UK's mass surveillance bill is illegal


High Court judges ruled that the Data Retention and Investigatory Powers Act (#DRIP) was inconsistent with the European convention on human rights.

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South Korean rhythmic gymnast is world's most stylish baseball pitcher

Say what you will about the accuracy of Shin Soo-ji's first pitch at the July 5 Doosan Bears/Samsung Lions game, but you can't fault her for style! (Thanks, Fipi Lele!)

360°

Huge, futuristic 3D printed mech-tank

Singaporean toymaker Michael Sng made Boudicca, a T1 Training Colossus -- a 3D-printed robot tank with 400 custom parts and servos controlled by an Arduino.

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State Department willing to overlook Malaysia's mass graves for the sake of TPP


The fast-track bill rammed through Congress last month lets the president walk right into any trade deal he wants, so long as it's with countries that have decent human rights records.

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Disney World after humanity's demise


Eledoremassis02's "manipulated photo" series Life After Disney is a series of gorgeously decayed visions for what Walt Disney World will look like long after humans have disappeared from the scene.

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UK schools' "anti-radicalisation" software lets hackers spy on kids


The spyware that Impero supplies to UK schools -- which searches kids' Internet use for "jihadi" terms -- uses "password" as its default password, and the company has threatened brutal legal reprisals against the researcher who repeatedly demonstrated their total security negligence.

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UK Tories launch quiet inquiry into privatising the NHS


David Cameron repeatedly promised to protect "our NHS" but now the world's most beloved healthcare system is on the chopping block, thanks to a quiet inquiry in the unelected House of Lords.

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Why aren't ethicists better people?


Professional ethicists aren't any more likely to behave ethically than baseline humans who don't get paid to sit around all day and contemplate the difference between right and wrong.

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Laura Poitras sues the US Government to find out why she was repeatedly detained in airports

The Oscar-winning documentarian, who directed Citizenfour, was detained and searched over 50 times, but the breaking-point was when the US Government refused to respond to her Freedom of Information Act request for the reasons for her harassment.

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Database: Old newspaper ads searching for loved ones lost to slavery


The Southwestern Christian Advocate ran its "Lost Friends" page from 1877 until "well into the first decade of the twentieth century."

The Historic New Orleans Collection has scanned 330 of these ads and made them available in a searchable database. They're not only an indispensable geneological and historical tool; they're also a powerful reminder of the bloody racial history of America.

Two dollars in 1880 bought a yearlong subscription to the Southwestern Christian Advocate, a newspaper published in New Orleans by the Methodist Book Concern and distributed to nearly five hundred preachers, eight hundred post offices, and more than four thousand subscribers in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee, and Arkansas. The "Lost Friends" column, which ran from the paper's 1877 inception well into the first decade of the twentieth century, featured messages from individuals searching for loved ones lost in slavery.

This searchable database provides access to more than 330 advertisements that appeared in the Southwestern Christian Advocate between November 1879 and December 1880. Digital reproductions of the Lost Friends ads are courtesy of Hill Memorial Library, Louisiana State University Libraries.

Lost Friends: Advertisements from the Southwestern Christian Advocate [Historic New Orleans Collection]

(via Making Light)

Nominate your Internet heroes for the 2015 EFF Pioneer Awards

Previous winners include Edward Snowden, Carl Malamud, Limor Fried, Laura Poitras, Hddy Lamarr, Aaron Swartz, Gigi Sohn, Bruce Schneier, Zoe Lofgren, Glenn Greenwald, Jon Postel and many others (I am immensely proud to have won one myself!).

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Disembodied mechanical random clickerfinger

Behold, Monobo's "Random User" -- a modded mouse with a mechanical finger that races around the tabletop, exploring "the identity on the Internet theories and the 'Google Analytics' world."

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Time-capsule: hi-rez scans of 1946 Toronto Star funny-pages pull-out


Zack writes, "Cartoonist John Martz was contacted by a woman who found a nearly 20-page comics section from 1946 under her floorboards while doing a home renovation. He scanned every one of the classic Sunday [ed: pretty sure the Star ran its comics on Saturdays] comics featured therein, including TERRY AND THE PIRATES, FLASH GORDON, MANDRAKE THE MAGICIAN and SUPERMAN."

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Upcoming O'Reilly conference on the future of work: WTF


Tim O'Reilly: "What do on-demand services, AI, and the $15 minimum wage movement have in common? They are telling us, loud and clear, that we’re in for massive changes in work, business, and the economy."

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Bloom County to return for 2016 election cycle


It's been 25 years since Berkeley Breathed retired from writing and drawing Bloom County, but in a new Facebook post, he indicates that the 2016 election cycle is too tempting an occasion for satire to sit out.

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