Think we don't need Banned Books Week anymore? Think again.


Peter from the National Coalition Against Censorship writes, "Some say book banning isn't even a problem anymore, so we should ditch Banned Books Week altogether. That's a terrible idea." Read the rest

Brass cuffs decorated with vintage maps, anatomy, science and math


Kate in Dorchester, England makes gorgeous brass wrist-cuffs decorated with vintage literary, cartographic and scientific imagery: there's Poe's Raven; the periodic table; anatomical dentistry drawings; Newton's laws of motion; the human spine; a map of the Thames and the Tower of London; a tape-measure; the human foot's bones; and headlines from Jack the Ripper's killings and much, much more. Read the rest

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Secret Coders: kids' comic awesomely teaches the fundamentals of computer science

Gene Luen Yang and Mike Holmes's Secret Coders is volume one in a new series of ingenious graphic novels for young kids that teach the fundamentals of computer science.

Zeroes: it sucks to be a teen, even with powers

Scott Westerfeld's YA canon is huge and varied, from the Uglies books to the excellent vampire parasitology book Peeps to the dieselpunk Clankers trilogy, and the new one, Zeroes, breaks new ground still: it's a collaboration with Margo Lanagan and Deborah Biancotti about teens with powers.

Phone Call from Paul: new literary podcast from Paul Holdengraber, with Neil Gaiman


Paul Holdengraber, host of the New York Public Library's legendary literary interview series, has started a new podcast called "A phone call from Paul," which he has inaugurated with a two-part interview with Neil Gaiman. Read the rest

Hilo: The Boy Who Crashed to Earth, a fantastic middle-grade adventure comic

Daniel Jackson Lim is the youngest kid in a huge family of overachievers, and he hardly surfaces in his family's consciousness -- which is a good thing, because he's just found a kid in silver underwear who can't remember anything before the moment he hurtled through a hole in space and hit the ground so hard he made a crater, but didn't hurt himself.

Gallery: Outside the Lines Too, more adult coloring brilliance


Souris "Hustler of Culture" Hong has followed up on her amazing 2013 coloring book Outside the Lines with a second edition: Outside the Lines Too. Read the rest

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Name your price for 11 (!) Philip K Dick award-winning novels

PKD.2015.All Covers Large-2

The PKD Award is given for the best paperback original this year, and has been awarded to such classics as Neuromancer. Storybundle's DRM-free collection of name-your-price ebooks includes some of my favorite books of all time: Walter Jon Williams's Knight Moves, Kathe Koja's The Cipher, Lewis Shiner's Frontera, Lisa Mason's Summer of Love, Elizabeth Hand's Aestival Time, and more. Read the rest

Randall "XKCD" Munroe's Thing Explainer book-tour


The XKCD Thing Explainer book -- which explains technical subjects using the thousand most common English words, in the style of Up Goer Five -- is due out in November, and Randall Munroe is going out on tour ("book trip") in November! Read the rest

Kickstarting an anthology of Hugo nominees


David Steffen is raising $1250 to defray costs on a collection of 2014 Hugo Award-nominated short stories; one of his stretch goals is an audio edition produced by the excellent Skyboat Media studios (where Wil Wheaton recorded the audiobook editions of Homeland and Information Doesn't Want to Be Free). Read the rest

Ian McDonald's "Luna: New Moon" - the moon is a much, much harsher mistress

We've projected our political and spiritual longings on the Moon since antiquity, and it's been a talismanic home to science fiction's most ambitious dreams for generations. But no one writes like Ian McDonald, and no one's Moon is nearly so beautiful and terrible as Luna: New Moon.

Artificial Intelligence, considered: Talking with John Markoff about Machines of Loving Grace


Literary podcaster Rick Kleffer writes, "I must admit that it was too much fun to sit down with John Markoff and talk (MP3) about his book Machines of Loving Grace. Long ago, I booted up a creaking, mothballed version of one of the first Xerox minicomputers equipped with a mouse to extract legacy software for E-mu. Fifteen years later I was at the first Singularity Summit; the book was a trip down many revisions of memory road."

John Markoff’s ‘Machines of Loving Grace: The Quest for Common Ground Between Humans and Robot’ is a fascinating, character-driven vision of how the recent past created the present and is shaping the near future. The strong and easily understood conflict at the heart of this work gives readers an easy means of grasping the increasingly complicated reality around us. If we do not understand this history, the chances are that we will not have the opportunity to be doomed to repeat it.

Our technological ecology began in two computer labs in Stanford in the early sixties. In one lab, John McCarthy coined the term “Artificial intelligence” with the intention of creating a robot that could think like, move like and replace a human in ten years. On the opposite side of the campus, Douglas Englebart wanted to make it easier for scholars to collaborate using an increasingly vast amount of information. He called it IA, Intelligence Augmentation as a direct response to AI. Thus were born two very different design philosophies that still drive the shape of our technology today – and will continue to do so in the future.

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Postcapitalism: A Guide to Our Future

Economist Paul Mason's blockbuster manifesto Postcapitalism suggests that markets just can't organize products whose major input isn't labor or material, but information, and that means that, for the first time in history, it's conceivable that we can have a society based on abundance.

Read Ben Hatke's original Adventures of Little Robot

Gina from First Second writes, "Cory reviewed Ben Hatke's wonderful graphic novel LITTLE ROBOT last week -- this week, celebrates it by reprinting Ben's charming robot comic strip that inspired the book!" Read the rest

Harry Potter sets skinned in Hogwarts House livery

Juniper takres the Scholastic editions and wraps them with gilded Gryffindon, Hufflepuff, Slytherin or Ravenclaw jackets. Read the rest

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