David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is Boing Boing's co-editor/managing partner. He's also a research director at Institute for the Future. On Instagram, he's @pesco.

Edgar Allan Poe sweater

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Archie McPhee & Co. offers this Edgar Allan Poe intarsia sweater for $42.50, "one size fits most." (via Dangerous Minds)

The Jackson 5ive, the cartoon (1971)

In 1971-1972, The Jackson 5ive were cartoon characters in a Saturday morning series directed by Robert Balser who previously was animation director for Yellow Submarine and later worked on Heavy Metal. (Thanks, Lux!)

Burger King's gothburger

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Burger King has launched a black burger in Japan made from black peppered-beef, buns and cheese darkened with bamboo charcoal, and a topping of garlic sauce blackened with squid ink.

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Video: violent family games of yore

In this episode of "They Actually Made That!?," our pal Attaboy demonstrates several strange and "violent" vintage family games.

Teenager charged with crime for sex with Jesus statue

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A 14-year-old in Everett, Pennsylvania who simulated oral sex with a Jesus statue and posted photos on Facebook has been charged with the crime of desecrating a venerated object.

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Video: billiards trick shots

Amazing trick shots by Ziemowit Janaszek.

Bob Mould: gay dance parties, punk rock, state fairs

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Over at Salon, punk legend Bob Mould talks to Rick Moody about rocking out in your 50s, deejaying big gay dance parties, and playing the Minnesota State Fair. I love Bob Mould.

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The Complete Zap Comix: a new boxed set

In November, our friends at Last Gasp will publish a sumptuous boxed set of The Complete Zap Comix, the series born in 1968 that launched the careers of R. Crumb, Robert Williams, S. Clay Wilson, Gilbert Shelton, Paul Mavrides, Victor Moscoso, Spain Rodriguez, and the entire culture of underground comix. Far fucking out.

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Generous criminal monkey distributes stolen cash

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In the northern Indian city of Shimla, a monkey burgled 10,000 rupees from a home, climbed a tree, and threw the bills down one-by-one on passers-by. This isn't the first such incident either.

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Why archeologists hate Indiana Jones

Inspired by Indiana Jones, I was an archeology major for about 10 minutes at the start of my freshman year in college. Of course, many real archeologists can't stand Indiana Jones, according to science journalist Erik Vance:

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Every archeology site in the world is littered with rugged people in wide-brimmed hats talking about long dead civilizations. Tulane archeologist Marcello Canuto, for instance, prefers the khaki, floppy variety. Walking back to camp with after a long day at one Northern Guatemalan site, I can’t help but make the obvious comparison.

“Oh God,” he groans, “Don’t even go there. Indiana Jones is not an archeologist...."

“That first scene, where he’s in the temple and he’s replacing that statue with a bag of sand – that’s what looters do,” Canuto says, grinning. “[The temple builders] are using these amazing mechanisms of engineering and all he wants to do is steal the stupid gold statue.”

"Why Archeologists Hate Indiana Jones"

Averaging thousands of images into one

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UC Berkeley researchers demonstrated software that averages thousands of similar photo to create a single representative image, like this wedding shot. Users can also refine and weight specific features within the source pool of photos to refine the average image.

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Richard "Jaws" Kiel, RIP

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Richard Kiel who played the steel-toothed Jaws in the James Bond films The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979) has died; he was 74 and 7-foot-2.

Star Wars sans music

Watch this Auralnauts video to see the importance of John Williams' bombastic score to Star Wars. (Thanks, Gil Kaufman!)

1974 young adult novel that forecasted the politics of drones

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Over at Medium's The List, Clive Thompson argues that a 1974 science fiction novel for teens called Danny Dunn, Invisible Boy "nailed everything we’re arguing today about personal drones, privacy, and the danger of government overreach." I can't wait to read the book!

This American Life: "I Believe I Can Fly"

51DTgYuPCwL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_ On This American Life, Jonathan Goldstein explores the shocking (and hilarious) reality behind a weird guidebook to 1970s paranormal and occult superpowers that utterly gripped him when he was 11 years old: Ultra-Psychonics: How to Work Miracles with the Limitless Power of Psycho-Atomic Energy.

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