David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is Boing Boing's co-editor/managing partner and Medium's head of creative services. On Instagram, he's @pesco.

Astounding History of Science auction

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A viewing window from the Manhattan Project plutonium production operation, an Apple I computer, and a wood and brass Helmholtz Sound Synthesizer from c.1905 (above) are among the incredible artifacts on the block for Bonham's History of Science auction taking place on October 22.

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Shipwreck off Haiti isn't Columbus's Santa Maria

Remember the reports in May that a shipwreck off Haiti was likely Christopher Columbus's Santa Maria? UNESCO researchers say nope.

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Coffin for a snake

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Above, a coffin for a snake. It's bronze, Egyptian, c. 664-30 BCE, and in the collection of the Brooklyn Museum.

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Winner of Boing Boing's Treasure Island Music Festival 2014 haiku contest!

Congratulations to Boing Boing reader Gary Theut (elDetroit) who won our annual Treasure Island Music Festival haiku contest!

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The Postal Service: new concert film/documentary

"Everything Will Change" is a new concert video/documentary about The Postal Service -- BB pal Ben Gibbard (Death Cab for Cutie) and Jimmy Tamborello (Dntel) with Jenny Lewis (Rilo Kiley) -- who released one phenomenal album in 2003, Give Up, and reunited for a tour last year.

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San Francisco, 10/29: Pesco interviews Cory on stage

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On Wednesday October 29 at 7pm, I'll be interviewing Cory on stage at the Jewish Community Center San Francisco!

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Judge: no pajamas, no money from underwear in court

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Signage at York County, Pennsylvania District Judge Ronald J. Haskell's court. (York Daily Record, via Weird Universe)

Steven Levy's Backchannel

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Veteran tech journalist Steven Levy, author of the seminal books Hackers and Crypto, launched his new tech hub Backchannel over at Medium.

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Video: All of The Simpsons couch gags, simultaneously

This is not an artwork by Nam June Paik but rather every couch gag from The Simpsons all at once.

Gaming scientific research

The scientists behind EteRNA, the 2003 game launched at Stanford to crowdsource potential RNA molecular structures, wrote a new paper analyzing how well the approach worked, stating that "It only recently hit us that EteRNA, despite being a game, is an unusually rigorous way to do science."

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Nap Anywhere head support

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I already can (and do) nap anywhere, but the Nap Anywhere looks like it would make it more comfortable to do so. Here's a video demo. (Thanks, Tanya Schevitz!)

Satoshi Araki's exquisite urban dioramas

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Tabletop photographs of incredibly realistic tiny dioramas by Satoshi Araki.

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Mini-documentary about the world's largest e-waste dump

Agbogbloshie in Accra, Ghana is the world's largest dump for electronic waste from all over the globe. Meet the teenagers who tend it in this short film, Regolith, directed by Sam Goldwater.

Second skin spacesuit

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MIT researchers are developing a "second skin" space suit lined with tiny coils that contract when switched on, tightening the garment around the body.

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Lab-grown penises ready for testing

In the next few years, researchers at the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine hope to transplant lab-grown penises into people who need them due to congenital abnormalities, disease, or traumatic injury.

The penises are grown from the patient's own cells on a 3D collagen scaffold made from a donor penis. Studies on rabbits "were very encouraging," says tissue engineering pioneer Anthony Atala, director of the Institute. From The Guardian:

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Because the method uses a patient's own penis-specific cells, the technology will not be suitable for female-to-male sex reassignment surgery.

"Our target is to get the organs into patients with injuries or congenital abnormalities," said Atala, whose work is funded by the US Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine, which hopes to use the technology to help soldiers who sustain battlefield injuries.

As a paediatric urological surgeon, Atala began his work in 1992 to help children born with genital abnormalities. Because of a lack of available tissue for reconstructive surgery, baby boys with ambiguous genitalia are often given a sex-change at birth, leading to much psychological anguish in later life. "Imagine being genetically male but living as a woman," he said. "It's a firmly devastating problem that we hope to help with."