The Cure's first ever television performance from 1979 is killer

Here's The Cure performing "A Forest" live on television at Paris's Theatre de l'Empire on December 3, 1979. Robert Smith was 20 years old at the time.

Read the rest

(UPDATED!) Fish caught with very strange "tattoos"

SEE UPDATE BELOW

This mysteriously "tattooed" fish was caught near Lopez Jaena in the Misamis Occidental province of the Philippines. Some locals considered the fish a warning from the depths. They're actually right, as the likely non-magical explanation is that the fish was caught in a printed plastic bag floating in the ocean and the pattern transferred to the animal's scales over time. (Mysterious Universe)

UPDATE:

According to ABS-CBN, "Zosimo Tano who caught the fish, clarified... that the print on the fish's body came from his shirt, which he used to cover the fish."

(Thanks, Teddy-Bob_Silas!)

Read the rest

New ultra-high resolution printer makes colors from nanostructures

Researchers from the Technical University of Denmark demonstrated a new nanotechnology-based printing technique that produces long-lasting color images on plastic at resolutions up to 127,000 dots per inch, many times more detailed than traditional laser printers. The system uses a laser to alter the structure of nanoscale structures on the plastic material. (A nanometer is one-billionth of a meter; a human hair is around 60,000 nanometers in diameter.) The nanoprinting technique could also lead to new kinds of 3D displays or invisible watermarks. From New Scientist:

The surface of the plastic is shaped so that it has lots of tiny pillars, one roughly every 200 nanometers. A thin film of the element germanium is then spread over the plastic. Heat from a laser melts the germanium on each pillar, morphing its shape and thickness. As a result, it reflects a specific color. The coating protects the shapes of the newly carved nanostructures.

Resonant laser printing of structural colors on high-index dielectric metasurfaces (ScienceAdvances) Read the rest

Entrancing avant-garde music video generated by algorithm

Damien Henry, co-inventor of Google Cardboard, trained a machine learning algorithm using footage shot from a moving vehicle and then had the machine generate this beautiful video.

"Graphics are 100% generated by an algorithm in one shot. No edit or post-processing," Henry writes. "Except the first one, all frames are calculated one by one by a prediction algorithm that tries to predict the next frame from the previous one."

The soundtrack is the Steve Reich masterpiece "Music for 18 Musicians."

Read the rest

Excellent vintage portable TV turned into retro gaming system

FinnAndersen spotted this wonderful vintage portable TV in a dumpster. He gutted most of it and outfitted the shell with a new screen and Raspberry Pi 3 to run RetroPie. Demo video below.

"It can emulate everything up to and including N64/PS1/Dreamcast, with a built-in wireless XBOX controller receiver for multiplayer parties!, he writes. "It also has a digital tuner inside to watch actual television, using the original knob for channel switching."

I'd love to do this to a JVC Videosphere!

"I turned an old portable TV into a dedicated retro gaming system!" (Imgur)

Read the rest

Robot riding on turtle's back steers it with "carrot-on-a-stick" technique

Researchers at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology attached small robots to the back of turtles and enabled the machine to steer the animal by delivering it snacks. Eventually, they hope to use similar systems to control fish and birds. The technology could lead to parasitic robot/animal "teams" for surveillance, exploration, and disaster response. From New Scientist:

The robots comprised a processor, a frame that stuck out in front of the turtle’s head holding five red LEDs spaced apart, and a food-ejecting tube. They then had to ride their turtle through five checkpoints in a tank filled with water...

The turtles were first conditioned to associate a lit-up LED with food. The robot then simply guided it using the LEDs and fed it snacks as a reward for going in the right direction. Using this process, five robot-turtle pairs successfully completed the course, and each sped up with practice.

"Parasitic Robot System for Waypoint Navigation of Turtle" (Journal of Bionic Engineering)

Read the rest

Man's gluten free airline meal request met with a single banana

Martin Pavelk pre-ordered a gluten-free breakfast for his All Nippon Airways flight from Tokyo to Sydney, Australia. He was served a single banana, a packet of salt, and a knife and fork.

“All other passengers were served a full breakfast meal consisting of eggs, sausage, mushrooms, bread, and yogurt,” Pavelk said. “This was a nine-hour flight. Although definitely gluten-free, the banana did not keep me full for very long.”

All Nippon Airways told The Telegraph that they have since "apologized to him personally and as a result of his experience we are reviewing our policy on gluten free options and how they are served.” Read the rest

Watch the final Wonder Woman movie trailer

Wonder Woman hits theaters June 2. Looks like a rather intense three hours, yet I still wish it was Lynda Carter, in her satin tights, fighting for our rights, and the old Red, White and Blue.

Read the rest

Deflating Pikachu aggressively pulled offstage during performance

At the recent Pokémon World Festival in Incheon, South Korea, a Pikachu deflated midway through a dance. Fortunately, agents specially-trained for such emergencies acted quickly and decisively. (See the action at 1:12 in the video.) (via Laughing Squid)

Read the rest

Wonderful home Super 8mm special effects experiments from the 1970s

Stoned special effects fun from the 1970s.

"I created these films in the 70's using Super 8mm film and a bunch of my creative friends," writes uploader WooferHound Town. "This is a collection of clips, there is no story here. This stuff was mostly filled in Huntsville Alabama.

(via /r/ObscureMedia, thanks UPSO!)

Read the rest

Meet a creepy little girl from the uncanny valley

Landon Meier, maker of fantastically realistic (and hyperrealistic) masks introduces us to a wonderfully weird little girl who visits us from the uncanny valley. (Stan Winston School via Laughing Squid)

Read the rest

Reggie Watts's classic Radiohead parody

With all the excitement/hype around the 20th anniversary of Radiohead's OK Computer, I was compelled to revisit Reggie Watts's 2012 brilliant performance of "Reggiohead" from his A "Live" in Central Park album.

Read the rest

Andy Warhol, Salvador Dali, Sonny Liston, and Whitey Ford's TV commercials for Braniff Airline

When you got it... flaunt it.

"As we eavesdrop on these odd couples trying to outflaunt each other, we hear everything that has to be said about Braniff (International airlines)," wrote famed designer and adman George Lois of his 1968 campaign for . "We also imply that you might bump into a celebrity or two on a Braniff flight...They are not idealized celebrities—they are famous people who are portrayed as lovable extroverts, combined to radiate a surreal kind of believability."

(r/ObscureMedia and Dangerous Minds)

Read the rest

Why people don't return shopping carts

Why do so many people just leave their shopping carts in the parking lot after unloading groceries instead of rolling them to the receptacles? Sure, one answer is laziness. But it's actually more interesting than that, involving what kind of cart user you are and how your motivation aligns with two general categories of social norms. You may be someone who always returns the cart, never returns it, only does so if it's convenience, feels pressure to return it from either a cart attendant or someone waiting to park in the spot where your cart is parked, you have children and they get a kick out of returning it. From Krystal D'Costa's "Anthropology in Practice" column in Scientific American:

Social norms fall into two general categories. There are injunctive norms, which drive our responses based on our perception of how others will interpret our actions. This means that we're inclined to act in certain ways if we think people will think well or think poorly of us. And there are descriptive norms, where our responses are driven by contextual clues. This means we're apt to mimic behaviors of others—so what we see or hear or smell suggests the appropriate/accepted response or behavior that we should display.

Supermarkets can try and guide our behavior with receptacles or cart attendants, but they’re competing with our own self-serving goals, which in this case may be staying dry, keeping an eye on our children, or simply getting home as quickly as possible, and we’re being guided by the ways others behave on top of that.

Read the rest

You can backspace on the iPhone calculator

Here's how's it's done:

Read the rest

Shatner auctioning Captain Kirk action figure that went to space

William Shatner is auctioning off his Captain Kirk action figure that orbited the Earth in 2014 aboard the Orion EFT-1 spacecraft. It's part of Shatner's Hollywood Charity Horse Show fundraiser that supports therapeutic horse riding programs for children with special needs. From the auction listing:

Star Trek Captain Kirk Action Figure of Captain Kirk in an Environmental Suit was the perfect choice to be part of the cargo that was flown aboard Orion EFT-1! The Orion EFT-1 flew two orbits around the earth on December 5, 2014. On the second orbit it reached a high apogee and reentered the Earth's atmosphere at 20,000 miles per hour. This action figure went along for the ride. The figure is still sealed in the shipping package it came back with and includes a folder with a letter of authentifiation from Lockheed Martin the flight certificate and a note from Mr. Shatner. In addition Mr. Shatner will personally autograph the figure for the winner if they choose. How many people can claim that they have a Star Trek action figure that flew on Orion?

(via Space.com) Read the rest

Ray Harryhausen's "Little Red Riding Hood" stop motion animation

In 1949, stop motion animation legend Ray Harryhausen, director of classics like The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958) and Jason and the Argonauts (1963), brought his developing SFX wizardry to the story of Little Red Riding Hood. (via /r/ObscureMedia)

Read the rest

More posts