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David Pescovitz

David Pescovitz is Boing Boing's co-editor/managing partner. He's also a research director at Institute for the Future. On Instagram, he's @pesco.

Documentary about UK counterculture in 1967

Over at Dangerous Minds, Richard points us to this fantastic 1967 short documentary "It's So Far Out It's Straight Down" from Granada Television. Allen Ginsberg, Pink Floyd, the staff of the International Times underground paper, and Paul McCartney all make the scene.

"The straights should welcome the underground because it stands for freedom," Sir Paul says. "It’s not strange it’s just new, it’s not weird, it’s just what’s going on around."

Magician makes dogs' treats vanish

Magician Jose Ahonen confounds canines with some sleight of hand. "By the way, all the dogs got treats before and after the trick," states the video description on YouTube.

A surgeon looks at Rodin's hands

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For many years, Stanford University surgeon James Chang has been fascinated by Rodin's hands, sculptures made by the French artist in the 19th century. Chang uses Rodin's hands in what sounds to be a marvelous undergraduate seminar titled "Surgical Anatomy of the Hand: From Rodin to Reconstruction" in which he combines 3D scans of the sculptures, a process seen above, with medical imaging of human bones, nerves, and blood vessels.

Rodins hands dig preview final

Now, Chang has collaborated on an exhibition at Satnford that lies at the intersection of science and art. “Inside Rodin’s Hands: Art, Technology, and Surgery” opens next week at Sanford's Cantor Arts Center.

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Mr. Hamiham's Persian cooking show

Please enjoy Mr. Hamiham's cooking show! I like the looks of these sandwiches that he prepared for last year's Persian festival of Sizdahbedar, and his celebratory dances between recipes. If you're impatient, fast forward to around 1:46. And don't miss the Sizdahbedar 2014 episode either! (Thanks, UPSO!)

Camille Rose Garcia paints the dreamy dance of death

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"Ghost Moth Serenade" (acrylic and glitter on wood, 36″ x 48″)

Camille Rose Garcia, painter of absinthe dreams, surreal fairy tales, and enchanting trips down the rabbit hole, has a show of new work opening tomorrow night, April 3, at Seattle's Roq La Rue Gallery. Garcia's influences range from dark children's books to the cut-ups of William Burroughs and Brion Gysin to the deepest crevices of Disney. Her new exhibition, titled "La Danse Macabre," will hang at the Roq until April 26th along with work by Canadian painter Peter Ferguson's black comedy narrative paintings. Camille paints the phantasmagoric dreamscapes that I yearn to visit while I'm asleep, and awake. Immerse yourselves in her art below. For more of Camille's work, I highly recommend her stunning illustrated versions of Snow White and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

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The Birth of the Lightsaber, a mini-documentary

George Lucas, Mark Hamill, and Star Wars sound designer Ben Burtt provide deep background on an elegant weapon, for a more civilized age.

Wonderful new book about "Magic Experience Design" (in Italian)

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Today marks the Italian publication of "L'arte Di Stupire" ("The Art of Amazement") the new book by Boing Boing friends and collaborators Ferdinando Buscema and Mariano Tomatis whose work is best described as "magic experience design." I've read a draft English translation and it's absolutely fantastic. I can't wait for the eventual publication of the English edition. Here's what I said about the book:

Buscema and Tomatis are modern day mystics who move seamlessly between the realms of science, art, and magic, seeking wonder at every turn. They delight in inspiring us all to cultivate curiosity and embrace astonishment in our daily lives. This brilliant book is an empowering grimoire for hacking reality and giving the gift of magical experiences to others.

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LIFE photo essay of 1960s Wiccans in the UK

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In 1964, LIFE magazine published a photo essay titled "Real Witches at Work," about Wiccans in contemporary England. They've just posted a number of those striking images plus others, including the beautiful shot above. Of course, people practicing witchcraft in the nude has always freaked out (and turned on) the squares. Here's how Mrs. Ray Bone, one of the Wiccans interviewed in LIFE at the time, responded to that mindset: “It seems obvious to me that people can be just as immoral with their clothes on as with them off.” Real Witches at Work: Photos of English Pagans in the 1960s

Cat shoes from Vans and ASPCA!

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Vans and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty (ASPCA) teamed up on a line of cat shoes! (thanks, Carlo Longino!)

Successful implant of 3D printed skull

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Utrecht neurosurgeons 3D-printed a large section of a skull and implanted it in a 22-year-old woman with a bone disorder. According to the University Medical Centre Utrecht, this is the first time such a large implant has been successful without rejection, so far anyway. After three months, the patient is back at work and, according to the surgeon, "it is almost impossible to see that she's ever had surgery." (Wired.co.uk, thanks Wes Allen!)

International children with their favorite toys

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Toystories

Gabriele Galimberti photographed children in 58 countries with their favorite toys. Here is his brand new book of the photographs: "Toy Stories: Photos of Children from Around the World and Their Favorite Things" (via Smithsonian)

fMRI mind-reading of faces

13958862212582 1 Yale University researchers used brain scans to "read" and reconstruct the faces that individuals were picturing in their minds' eye. The scientists ran fMRI scans on six people as they looked at 300 different faces. Those scans enabled the creation of a database of facial features tied to specific brain response patterns. Then the subjects were shown faces they hadn't seen before. Based on the new fMRI data, a computer was able to generate good approximations of the face the subject was viewing.

“It is a form of mind reading,” said Marvin Chun, Yale professor of psychology, cognitive science and neurobiology who led the study.

The research will be published in the science journal NeuroImage, and an uncorrected proof is available here (only the abstract is free).

More in this Yale press release and Los Angeles Times article.

Previously:

Brain scans reveal our mind movies?

Italian stock exchange flips us off

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From my Instagram feed: In 2010, Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan was commissioned to create a sculpture for the front of Milan's Borsa Italiana, the Italian stock exchange. This was the result, and it's still standing. The 4-meters tall marble sculpture is titled "L.O.V.E." I visited the sculpture on Friday and found it to be quite stately and inspiring.Here is a WSJ article about it. (Thanks, Ferdinando Buscema!)

Breathtaking time-lapse video of marine life

Photographer Daniel Stoupin created this magical time-lapse video of "slow" marine life. "Microworlds: Slow Life"