Boing Boing 

Mark Frauenfelder

Mark Frauenfelder is the founder of Boing Boing and the founding editor-in-chief of MAKE. He is editor-in-chief of Cool Tools and co-founder of Wink Books. Twitter: @frauenfelder. His new book is Maker Dad: Lunch Box Guitars, Antigravity Jars, and 22 Other Incredibly Cool Father-Daughter DIY Projects



Nurse held man's mouth shut to prevent him from singing the Pinky and Perky theme song

The real reason I'm posting this is because I love the video.

An abusive nurse who held a patient’s mouth shut to stop him singing the Pinky and Perky theme tune has been struck off. Benson Blackmore became enraged with the patient at the Carleton Clinic in Carlisle, Cumbria, who liked singing the theme to the 1950s children’s TV show. He also pushed the patient down a corridor while his trousers were hanging around his ankles, the Nursing and Midwifery Council heard.
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Man and his pipe-smoking dog warned to kick the habit

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Excellent and exceedingly gruesome makeup tutorials

Special effects makeup artist Kiana Jones (Aka Freakmo) creates great, super creepy makeup tutorial videos, featuring severed fingers, maggot infested eyes, slit throats, torn flesh, and fresh scars.

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The time McDonald's ripped off the creators of H.R. Pufnstuf

Over at Mental Floss, we learn about the time McDonald's met with H.R. Pufnstuf creators Sid and Marty Krofft, picked their brains, then went on to make "McDonaldland commercials that blatantly ripped off the Kroffts’ technology and feel."

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Village has a model village which contains a model model village which contains a model model model village...

Bourton-on-the-Water, a village in Gloucestershire, has a model village you can walk through. The model village has a model model village. The model model village has a model model model village. And the model model model village has a model model model model village. They stopped before hitting the Matroyshka Limit.

Chimp with stick knocks drone out of sky

He may be related to the primate featured in "Thus Spake the Chimp with a Stick."

Photos secretly taken of family through window are art, not invasion of privacy: court


Photo from Arne Svenson's exhibit, The Neighbors

For a year, Arne Svenson secretly took photos of a New York City family living in a loft across from his apartment. He put the photos on exhibit and family sued, but lost, because the judges said the photos were works of art.

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Cocktails & Dreams -- nightmare version of 80s Tom Cruise movie

This took a ton of work, but man, it was worth it!

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Minecraft: The Complete Handbook Collection just $14

I reviewed this beautifully designed Minecraft boxed set of four hardcover handbooks in December. The price has since dropped to $14, which is a great deal.

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EFF busts podcasting patent, invalidating key claims at Patent Office

A patent troll that claims that its failed 1990 cassettes-by-mail business is the same thing as podcasting got cut off at the knees today when the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) invalided its bogus claims. Over one thousand people (myself included) donated to the EFF's Save Podcasting campaign to defeat the troll.

The “podcasting patent” became big news in 2013, when a company called Personal Audio, LLC, began demanding licensing fees from podcasters including comedian Adam Carolla and three major television networks. Personal Audio doesn’t do podcasting itself, but instead used its patent to claim infringement and collect payouts from actual creators.

In petitions filed with Patent Office, EFF showed that Personal Audio did not invent anything new before it filed its patent application, and, in fact, other people were podcasting for years previously. Earlier examples of podcasting include Internet pioneer Carl Malamud's "Geek of the Week" online radio show and online broadcasts by CNN and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

Personal Audio claimed to have invented podcasting, but the EFF convinced the USPTO that this was not the case:

In petitions filed with Patent Office, EFF showed that Personal Audio did not invent anything new before it filed its patent application, and, in fact, other people were podcasting for years previously. Earlier examples of podcasting include Internet pioneer Carl Malamud's "Geek of the Week" online radio show and online broadcasts by CNN and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

I hope the podcasters who were bilked by Personal Audio get their money back.

Here's a link to the full decision.

CC Image: Kamil Antosiewicz Monika Powalisz

Big Hero 6 fabric excludes girl characters because boys think girls are "yuck": manufacturer

big-hero-6

UPDATE (4/10/2015, 3:30pm PT): See comment from Springs Creative below.

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Watch: non-stick yogurt lid

Demonstration of a yoguphobic material. Probably LiquiGlide, or something similar.

Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 tips on how to write a good short story

From Kurt Vonnegut’s introduction to his short story anthology, Bagombo Snuff Box, 8 tips on how to write a good short story.

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Watch an NYPD Detective pocket $2,650 during a loose cigarette sting

At least this NYPD detective didn't kill someone for selling loose cigarettes. Instead, he allegedly stole $2,650, perhaps as a way of rewarding himself for a job well done.

Ian Cyrus, a 12-year veteran of the department, was helping his fellow officers conduct the raid after a store employee allegedly sold loose cigarettes to an undercover officer. They took $593 from the cash register as well as packs of cigarettes as evidence, WABC-TV reported.

But deli owner Ali Abdullah noticed something else was missing — about $2,650 in rent funds hidden in a box under the store's counter. After looking at the security footage, the money appeared to have disappeared into Cyrus's pocket. The moment comes around the 1:20 mark in the video [above].

Ian Cyrus, the detective seen in the video stuffing the wad of cash in his pocket, has been suspended, but not arrested.

How to survive a mega-drought

Ben Phelan of Matter offers advice on living in a Golden State without water.

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Amazon is suing company that sells reviews

Amazon is suing the owner of the website buyazonreviews.com, which sells 4- and 5-star reviews for about $20 per review. I hope we get to see the subpoenaed records so we can find out which authors, publishers, and manufacturers buy shill reviews to boost their products on Amazon.

The home page of the site promises, “Never has it been easier to get multiple 4 and 5 star reviews on your Amazon product page. We provide real reviews from aged accounts with real buying activity. Most products in the Amazon marketplace will never even be seen. The more positive reviews you have the better your chances are.”

Geekwire learned that buyazonreviews changed its FAQ after it ran a story about the lawsuit:

Amazon files first-ever suit over fake product reviews, alleging sites sold fraudulent praise

Bicycle distressed playing cards

The Bicycle Distressed Expert Back deck ($5) looks like its been dipped in espresso, wiped off with a burlap bag, and left in the desert for a couple of years, but it's brand new and handles perfectly. It's based on the Expert Back design introduced by Bicycle in 1895.