Appliance that makes tortillas from Keurig-like pods


Those who enjoy digital-rights-management coffee will be attracted to the $437 Flatev. It's a large kitchen appliance that makes tortillas (in a variety of flavors). Simply pop in a proprietary pod (79 cents) containing pre-mixed flour and water, and in a few minutes the Flatev will dispense a piping hot tortilla.

Some people on the Internet claim it's possible to make a tortilla without a Flatev. Read the rest

The Temple of Silence: Forgotten Worlds of Herbert Crowley


Beehive Books is kickstarting a super-deluxe book of the work of Herbert Crowley, who was kind of an early 20th Century Jim Woodring.

The cartoonist, painter, illustrator, and sculptor Herbert Crowley was an innovator at the dawn of comics, and a defining figure of the early 20th century New York City avant garde art scene.

He exhibited his work in dozens of venues, including the legendary Armory Show of 1913 alongside Picasso and van Gogh, and in a joint exhibition with Léon Bakst in 1914. He received countless glowing reviews, describing him as a visionary voice exploring a brand new form of art. His cartoons were featured in the now-storied New York Herald Sunday comics section, printed on the reverse side of of Winsor McCay's masterpiece LITTLE NEMO IN SLUMBERLAND.

A 1915 article in The Bookman called Crowley an artist whose “star is very decidedly in the ascendant. New York City at large discovered Herbert Crowley only a few months ago; but, once having been discovered, he is not the sort of person easily to be forgotten.”

But then… he was.

In 1917, he disappeared from the New York City scene, and never showed his artwork again.

In Art Out of Time, Dan Nadel’s 2006 collection of comics by unknown cartoonists, several of Crowley’s strips are reproduced as examples of vital early newspaper cartooning that had been unjustly and completely forgotten. In a short piece at the end of the anthology, Nadel describes Crowley as representing the “single largest information gap in this book,” — a book about unremembered artists — and writes that that aside from the existence of these comic strips, “nothing else is known about Crowley or his work.”

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Attachments that give you an excuse to use mason jars


Jarware makes cute specialized lids to convert mason jars into things like cocktail shakers, tea infusers, honey dippers, juicers, and piggy banks.

[via] Read the rest

Pigeons sink into grain


These birds seem calm about sinking into grain. Some of them even fly into the pit as if they want to be buried in grain.

[via] Read the rest

Great deal on LED bulbs


I have these TaoTronics 60 Watt LED equivalent bulbs and like them a lot. At $13 for 6 (when you use code RSHKZDMQ on Amazon), it's a great deal. I prefer the Soft White (3000K) because the Daylight ones are a bit harsh. Read the rest

English man spends 11 hours trying to make cup of tea with Wi-Fi kettle


The iKettle is advertised as “the world’s first Wi-Fi kettle.” Mark Rittman got one and said it took 11-hours to make a cup of tea.

From The Guardian:

A key problem seemed to be that Rittman’s kettle didn’t come with software that would easily allow integration with other devices in his home, including Amazon Echo, which, like Apple’s Siri, allows users to tell connected smart devices what to do. So Rittman was trying to build the integration functionality himself.

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Samantha Bee makes fun of Paul Ryan's Pussyghazi response


Samantha Bee should be championed and revered for explaining why Paul Ryan is an awful person. Read the rest

Police arrest more people for marijuana use than for all violent crimes combined

Image: Narco Polo

Forty five years after Richard Nixon launched the war on drugs as a way to persecute black people, little has changed, according to a new ACLU/Human Rights Watch report.

The ACLU/Human Rights Watch report shows that arrests for drug possession continue to make up a significant chunk of modern-day police work.

"Around the country, police make more arrests for drug possession than for any other crime," the report finds, citing FBI data. "More than one of every nine arrests by state law enforcement is for drug possession, amounting to more than 1.25 million arrests each year."

In fact, police make more arrests for marijuana possession alone than for all violent crimes combined.

The report finds that the laws are enforced unequally, too. Over their lifetimes, black and white Americans use illicit drugs at similar rates, according to federal data. But black adults were more than two-and-a-half times as likely to be arrested for drug possession.

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How much does it cost to live in different cities around the world?


iamlindoro says: "I built a site that builds you custom budgets for 600 cities around the world based on your lifestyle, family, housing, and other needs." Read the rest

Beautiful 1959 Edward Gorey book cover featuring a giant flaming spider


Illustrator Edward Gorey at his finest with this cover for an out-of-print paperback from 1959, Nineteenth Century German Tales.

Here is a PDF of the cover story, "The Black Spider," by Jeremias Gotthelf, written in 1842. Read the rest

Arduino clone project kit loaded with components


The Elegoo UNO Project Super Starter Kit comes with a bunch of different components, including sensors, a servo motor, a stepper motor, a joystick, a breadboard, and lots more. Most of the reviewers say that the Elegoo UNO is a good Arduino Uno clone. The one thing people have complained about is the tutorials. They say they are poorly written. That's not a problem because there are lots of great Arduino books, and I have a video class on getting started with Arduino on Skillshare that is highly rated. At $32, the components alone are worth the price. Read the rest

What Am I Doing Here? Existential absurdist cartoons from the 1940s


What Am I Doing Here? by Abner Dean New York Review Comics 2016, 168 pages, 7 x 0.75 x 9.5 inches $19 Buy one on Amazon

In the 1930s and 1940s, Abner Dean was a highly sought-after illustrator who drew covers, cartoons, and illustrations for The New Yorker, Esquire, Time, Life, and Newsweek, as well as advertising illustrations for insurance companies and product manufacturers. In 1945, Dean quit his day job and drew the first of seven books that have been described as “existential gag cartoons.”

What Am I Doing Here? is Dean’s second book, and is generally regarded as his best work. It was originally published in 1947. This facsimile edition just came out today and contains about 100 single panel drawings, rendered in India ink and graytone washes (in the classic New Yorker style of gag cartoons).

Dean’s drawings look like cartoons but they aren’t very funny, at least not in the traditional sense. They’re absurdist and disquieting. Everyone is naked and the action takes place either in decrepit urban settings, living rooms filled with grinning desperate characters, or barren surrealistic wastelands. Each drawing features the same hapless character, a lonely youngish man who questions his role in the human race, represented by a crowd that changes its form and behavior from page to page. The people are sometimes club-swinging brutes, other times they are blinkered sleepwalkers, insincere mask-wearers, bloodthirsty mobs, hysterical celebrators, suicidal lemmings, or guru-seeking fools. They often look more like animals than people. The protagonist is at times foolhardy, delusional, disappointed, fearful, proud, insecure, ruthless, or bewildered. Read the rest

Citizen Kane speech sounds like Trump's threat to imprison Clinton

Donald Trump's favorite movie is Citizen Kane. Read the rest

Amazing mime


Somewhere in Japan, this man is taking a very long time to cross the street.

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SPY is back! (sort of)


Esquire has rebooted the greatly missed SPY magazine from the the 1980s. It exists as a web site and will run new pieces during the 30 days running up to the election.

SPY co-founder Kurt Andersen wrote:

As Trump became the Republicans' presumptive nominee, lots more people, pretty much every day, said to me, "SPY really needs to be rebooted, if only just for the election."

I guess maybe they're right, so I'm very pleased that Esquire has decided to produce an online pop-up SPY during the last thirty days of the presidential campaign. It has my whole-hearted best wishes. And it's also a nice serendipity that this October will mark the magazine's thirtieth anniversary. It's as if SPY, a retired superhero, is making a brief but necessary comeback.

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Investor to Theranos: Give us back our $96 million


It's hard to know who to feel less sorry for - a Silicon Valley company with a portfolio of quackery and deceit or the San Francisco hedge fund that was bamboozled into investing $96.1 million in it? On Monday, Partner Fund Management LP filed a lawsuit against Theranos in an attempt to get its money back. A letter to its investors said, "Through a series of lies, material misstatements, and omissions, the defendants engaged in securities fraud and other violations by fraudulently inducing PFM to invest and maintain its investment in the company.”

From the Wall Street Journal:

The suit is the first sign of trouble from investors who poured about $800 million into the company, and then remained silent as it navigated a challenging year that began when the Journal first reported on shortcomings in its operations and technology last October.

[Founder Elizabeth] Holmes had said Theranos could accurately perform dozens of tests using a few drops of blood, a premise that drove the firm to a valuation of $9 billion in a 2014 fundraising round. The Journal’s investigation showed it used its flagship technology for a small number of tests, relied on devices made by conventional manufacturers and released questionable test results to patients.

Since then, Theranos has voided tens of thousands of test results, faces federal civil and criminal investigations, and is appealing a regulator’s revocation of its blood-testing license at a California lab.

Good luck getting your money back, PFM. And good luck with your pivot, Theranos. Read the rest

Trump and Clinton sing "Time of my Life"


Did you catch the delightful duet after Sunday's debate?" Read the rest

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