Mark Frauenfelder

Mark Frauenfelder is the founder of Boing Boing and the founding editor-in-chief of MAKE. He is editor-in-chief of Cool Tools and co-founder of Wink Books. Twitter: @frauenfelder. His new book is Maker Dad: Lunch Box Guitars, Antigravity Jars, and 22 Other Incredibly Cool Father-Daughter DIY Projects



City worker hits car with van - who should pay?

From Weird Universe: "Who’s responsible? Megan Campbell's parked car was hit by a van driven by a city worker, so now she wants the city to pay for the damages. Sounds reasonable. But Campbell was the city worker driving the van that hit her own car. The city is reviewing the incident."

Bill Murray interviewed on Howard Stern Show

Bill Murray doesn't do a lot of interviews, but since he has a new movie to promote (St. Vincent), he came on the Howard Stern Show for an entertaining one-hour interview.

UNBOXING: $150 Kano computer

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I took photos of the cute-looking Raspberry Pi powered Kano computer, which was made for kids to learn how to code their own music, games, and software. Jane and I will hook it up to the TV (it uses any HDMI device as a monitor) and let you know what we think.

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2011 Japan Tsunami video

I recently came across this video of the tsunami that hit Japan in 2011. The video at the forty second mark of cars turning around to escape from the oncoming wave of water and deadly debris is nightmarish.

When artist Josh Dorman discovered Paul Klee

On the latest episode of Bullseye with Jesse Thorn, artist Josh Dorman talks about his fascinating with artist Paul Klee.

Josh Dorman is a fine artist from New York. He specializes in invented landscapes, created in a mixture of collage, drawing and painting. His images play around with the ideas of time and space to create an unusual reality.

Dorman was a sophomore in college when he discovered Paul Klee and his painting Landscape With Yellow Birds. And it really affected him -- maybe too much? He'll explain.

Dorman has a solo show up in New York right now.

Ansel Adams called photographer William Mortensen "the Antichrist"


L’Amour (1935). Photograph: William Mortensen

Our friends at Feral House have a new book coming out on the work of photographer William Mortensen, called American Grotesque. Chris Campion of the Guardian has a nice profile of Mortensen and his lurid, heavily retouched photographs of "death, nudity and torture." Ansel Adams and his pals in Group f/64 loathed Mortensen (even though they happily used processing techniques invented by Mortensen).

Even after Mortensen’s death in 1965 from leukemia, Group f/64 and their flunkies the Newhalls could not stop talking of their loathing for him. Beaumont described his work as “perverse”; Willard Van Dyke, a founder of Group f/64, said “his work was disgusting”; and Adams summed him up with the words, “For us, he was the antichrist.”

Ultimately though, for all the griping of Adams and f/64, it turns out that Mortensen was the true modernist all along, not them. For today, we are surrounded by images of the fantastic and unreal. In comic-book movies such as Spider-Man and Rise of the Planet of the Apes, special effects merge seamlessly into the action and the monsters appear as real as humans. A photograph is rarely just a photograph these days, seen without filters or retouching. And, thanks to sites like Instagram, many of Mortensen’s painstaking techniques can now be applied with the touch of a button.

William Mortensen: photographic master at the monster’s ball

Video of extreme haunted house in San Diego

McKamey Manor is a home haunted house in San Diego. It looks intense.

Here are a few requirements you must pass to even be able to enter: you now must be 21 years of age (previously was 18), you’re required to sign a wavier, and you must be in excellent physical condition. Only two people go in at a time, and get this… it can last anywhere from 4 – 7 hours. They actually now only take four people through the haunted house each week.

One Of The Most Extreme And Disturbing Haunted Houses On The Planet

(Thanks, Sarina!)

NY Times (1924): Hitler "tamed" and "no longer to be feared"

Jewish Standard: In the The New York Times on this day in 1924: "Hitler...No longer to be feared.

I didn't know Judith Miller was writing for the Times 90 years ago!

Foundations in Comic Book Art - Master the tools, techniques, and habits of cartooning

Of course, comic book artists must know how to draw well, but there’s a lot more to drawing a comic book than just knowing how to draw. Cartoonists must work according to specific guidelines on a deadline to produce lots of drawings that tell a story. Foundations in Comic Book Art, by industry veteran John Paul Lowe (DC, Marvel, Dark Horse), outlines the techniques, shortcuts, and tools that a beginning cartoonist needs to know to get started. He’s an instructor at The Savannah College of Art and Design, and the lessons in this book, which include using traditional and electronic media, were created to help cartoonists efficiently and effectively produce quality comic book art.

Foundations in Comic Book Art by John Paul Lowe

Take a look at other beautiful paper books at Wink. And sign up for the Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Origins of urban legend about Green Eggs and Ham ban

Jesse Walker fesses up.

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Dynamite embroidered cloth patches that tell it like it is

patchesArtist Mitch O'Connell has posted his astonishingly large collection of 1970s embroidered patches. I hope somebody starts making them again!

Paperback edition of Tonoharu - graphic novel about English teacher in Japan

In 2010 I reviewed Tonoharu: Part One, Lars Martinson's graphic novel about a young American who gets a job as an English teaching assistant in a small Japanese town. I'm happy to report that it has come out in paperback!

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Molecules: The Elements and the Architecture of Everything

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In 2009, Theodore Gray blew minds with his gorgeously photographed book, The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe, which sold over a million copies. Five years later, Gray has created this book, which describes what happens when elements are snapped together to make molecules, and the result is a masterpiece (thanks in no small part to Nick Mann’s drool-inducing photographs). Gray organizes the book by categories of molecules — inorganic, organic, acids, bases, soaps, solvents, oils, sweeteners, and other common substances — highlighting their similarities and differences. Suddenly, the physical world makes a lot more sense.

Molecules: The Elements and the Architecture of Everything
by Theodore Gray (Author), Nick Mann (Photographer)
2014, 240 pages, 10.25 x 9.5 x 1 inches, Hardcover

Take a look at other beautiful paper books at Wink. And sign up for the Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

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Le Premier Bonheur du Jour by Françoise Hardy

It's Friday afternoon. Time to listen to Françoise Hardy sing "Le Premier Bonheur du Jour."

Signed copy of Beatles' Please Please Me sells for $36,655

A copy of the Beatles' 1963 album Please Please Me, signed by all four Moptops sold for $36,655 on eBay.

When it comes to memorabilia, you can't do much better than early Beatles items. They're an iconic group with millions of loyal fans worldwide. Even fifty-years-later their music continues to have a demand. When you consider their huge fan base and small amount of early memorabilia available. Finding a fully-signed record in mint condition (fifty-years later) is exceptionally rare.

This actually seems like a bargain. I'll bet this album will sell for 10 times as much in a decade.

Bonus fact: The album's title song, "Please Please Me," is probably the most famous song about a blowjob ever recorded.