Mark Frauenfelder

Mark Frauenfelder is the founder of Boing Boing and the founding editor-in-chief of MAKE. He is editor-in-chief of Cool Tools and co-founder of Wink Books. Twitter: @frauenfelder. His new book is Maker Dad: Lunch Box Guitars, Antigravity Jars, and 22 Other Incredibly Cool Father-Daughter DIY Projects



School superintendent asked girls to bend over during dress code check

Noble, Oklahoma school superintendent Ronda Bass is reported to have told an assembly of high school students that girls would be expected to bend over during a dress code check. “If you’re not comfortable with bending over," she warned. "We might have a problem.”

It's for a good cause, though - targeting "skanks." She allegedly told the students: “Have y’all ever seen any ‘skanks’ around this school…I don’t want to see anyone’s ass hanging out of their shorts.”

In a radio interview, Bass (who calls herself "Mama Bear Bass") denied saying anything inappropriate. “I want us to be known as the classy lady Bears.”

School Superintendent Asks Female Students To Bend Over During Dress Code Check

The Magician and the Cardsharp: The Search for America's Greatest Sleight-of-Hand Artist

A Gweek listener recommended The Magician and the Cardsharp to me (I can't remember who - sorry!) and I'm thankful he did. It's a well-told story about two men with intersecting lifelong goals. The first man was Allen Kennedy (1865–1961) a professional card cheat who spent many years perfecting his technique to deal cards from the center of the deck undetected. The second man was Dai Vernon (1894–1992), one of the most highly-respected sleight-of-hand magicians in history.

Vernon, who worked as a silhouette cutter in department stores, had been interested in card tricks (especially ones involving sleight-of-hand) since childhood. By the time he was an adult, he'd gained a reputation for being one of the best card handlers in the world. From time-to-time, Vernon would heard rumors that there was a professional cardsharp somewhere in Missouri who'd mastered the mythical Center Deal, a move that almost every magician dismissed as an impossible fantasy.

Vernon had his doubts too, but the rumors continued to spread, and his curiosity got the better of him. He embarked on a years-long quest, involving much travel and encounters with scary characters, to find out if there really was someone who had invented an undetectable center deal and, if he existed, to convince the man to teach him how it was done. This book is not only the story of Vernon's search for, and eventual meeting with, the man behind the rumor, it is also a history of the American midwest's rough-and-tumble past, replete with illegal gambling dens, speakeasies, con-men, whorehouses, and mobsters. Author Karl Johnson does a fine job of bringing the dusty, dangerous, boisterous, exciting atmosphere of small city vice to life.

The Magician and the Cardsharp

Video below shows a sample of the genius of Dai Vernon:

WWII was won by shirtless, grapefruit-juice-drinking men

fruit-juice

Check out the large shell that man is handling! When they finished, they took a nice bath together:

(Via X-Ray Delta One)

WATCH: two young guys lip sync conversation between two 60ish sisters

This guy and his friend act out recorded conversations between his mom and his aunt.

WATCH: women steal new lawn

Lancashire Police who viewed the video say: "Police have investigated this incident. We're at the stage that there are no further lines of inquiry but would appeal to anyone with information to come forward."

(Via Arbroath)

Drew Friedman's portraits of the pioneering legends of comic books

Drew Friedman is the great caricaturist of our age. His series of portrait books, Old Jewish Comedians, More Old Jewish Comedians, and Even More Old Jewish Comedians brought him well-deserved acclaim when they came out a few years ago. His latest book of meticulous watercolor portraits is called Heroes Of The Comics, and it includes short biographies of dozens of famous and not-famous-but-important cartoonists, editors, writers and publishers from the golden age of comics. I had no idea what many of the comic book artists I've admired for decades looked like, and it was a treat to finally see the faces of Steve Ditko (Spiderman), Dave Berg and Jack Davis (Mad), and John Stanley (Little Lulu), rendered in Friedman's detailed style, replete with liver spots, wrinkles, and rumpled clothes.

Friedman even included one villain amongst the heroes: Frederic Wertham, the psychiatrist who used flawed data to write Seduction of the Innocent, the infamous 1954 anti-comics scaremongering book that led to the end of the vibrant comic book industry and the careers of many of the heroes in the pages of Friedman's book.

Heroes Of The Comics, by Drew Friedman

Take a look at other beautiful paper books at Wink. And sign up for the Wink newsletter to get all the reviews and photos delivered once a week.

Because American Spectator editor likes scotch, weed must remain illegal

Bob Tyrrell, founder and editor-in-chief of The American Spectator (the stupid person's idea of a smart magazine) enjoys scotch, which is sufficient reason to lock up everyone who doesn't share his taste in recreational drugs.

Both drinking and pot smoking are "coping mechanisms," he concedes, but alcohol is clearly more "civilized" because people can enjoy the taste, drink while reading or conversing, and imbibe without getting "blitzed." All this is either impossible or quite rare among cannabis consumers, Tyrrell asserts with the confidence of someone who has no idea what he's talking about.

Jacob Sullum: Because Bob Tyrrell Prefers Scotch, Marijuana Should Be Banned

Battle of the butt-in-the-air arachnid superheroes


This recent Milo Manara cover painting for a variant issue of Spider-Woman #1 has generated a lot of comments on comic book enthusiast fora.

Poor J. Scott Campbell didn't get nearly the same amount of attention for his 1999 cover of Spiderman in a similar pose:

(Via Heidi MacDonald)

David Rees teaches you how to do the things you think you already know how to do

As host of Going Deep with David Rees on the National Geographic Channel, David teaches viewers how to master often-overlooked skills, like tying your shoes, shaking hands, lighting matches, and making a good first impression.

Read the rest

Buttle/Tuttle mixup: Cops tell innocent woman she is dead, then throw her in jail

mcneal

Shannon Renee McNeal (right), a 42-year-old woman, has filed a lawsuit against St Louis police and court personnel after they falsely arrested her on felony drug possession charges that were meant for Shannon Raquel McNeal (left), who was 13 years younger. The booking officer at the jail acknowledged that Shannon Renee McNeal's fingerprints didn't match the wanted woman's (who, incidentally, had been dead for three months before the warrant was approved) but jailed her anyway, using the "not my problem" excuse.

A county clerk also allegedly confirmed the officer’s mistake, but Shannon Renee McNeal was still transferred to the city’s department of corrections and assigned a caseworker. After the caseworker also confirmed she was not the suspect, McNeal was allegedly told to retain her own attorney -- which she could not afford -- or notify prosecutors herself.

The suit states that McNeal was kept in jail for two days despite the multiple confirmations of her innocence, during which time she was sprayed with pesticides that burned her stomach and back, before being released on the orders of Circuit Judge Thomas Frawley.

McNeal was fired from her job from the mistake and has to pay to get her named expunged from public databases that falsely claim she has a criminal record.

Insane case of mistaken identity: Woman arrested, told she’s actually dead, jailed anyway

How big is the Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet?

With a nucleus size of 3.5×4 km, 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko seems like a mere speck. But Michel (@quark1972 on Twitter) shows what the comet would look like if it were gently set down in Los Angeles. I wish the city would commission a life-size replica as public art! (via io9)

WATCH: instructional doodling videos

Do you really need instructions on how to doodle? Sure! Shoobeedoodling's YouTube videos are inspiring and fun to watch. He has a soothing voice and excellent technique. I wish he'd post more frequently.

Making a better butter knife

Three Australian designers have made a butter knife that works like a cheese grater. No more torn bread! The Stupendous Splendiferous Butterup has raised $186,212 on Kickstarter. Reserve one for US$16."

WATCH: Jim Henson's colorful papercut jazz animation

Before he achieved fame with the Muppets, Jim Henson, a skilled animator as well as a puppeteer, was making all sorts of innovative work out of his home studio, in Bethesda, Md. Around 1961, he made the papercut animation above, which visualized jazz drummer Chico Hamilton's "Drums West."

(Via Smithsonian)