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Susannah Breslin

I'm a writer and blogger.

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Fucking hell: Link

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Life saving HIV treatment: Three problems, one solution: Link (via @msf_uk)

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Scintillation: Link

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Put on a happy face: Link

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Mirrors soothe phantom limp pain: Link

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Lissy Trullie, "Ready for the Floor," Richard Kern: Link

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unofficial "Into the Wild" title sequence created by 21-year-old Dutch design student: Link

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Joy Division, "Transmission," steel drum bus thing: Link

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Antony and the Johnsons cover Beyonce's "Crazy in Love": Link

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Bye-bye, Boing Boing!

Susannah Breslin is a guestblogger on Boing Boing. She is a freelance journalist who blogs at Reverse Cowgirl and is at work on a novel set in the adult movie industry.

And so ends my guestblogging stint here on Boing Boing. Thank you so much to Xeni, David, Cory, and Mark for having me! It was a delight, an honor, and a thrill.

I leave you with this awesome video created by Lieutenant Commander Spencer Abbot, who shot this footage from the cockpit of an F/A-18 Hornet with a fiber optic camera stuck to his helmet.

This is a video of a Navy F/A-18 Hornet tanking from Air Force KC-10's and KC-135's (the KC-135 is particularly challenging-- pilots call it the "Iron Maiden"). In turbulent weather, especially at night, tanking can be even tougher than landing on the ship. The basket is heavy, and it can damage the plane if it strikes it, to include shattering the canopy. One can only imagine the amusement of the tanker crews (to whom we're very grateful) as they watch us flail around on a bumpy day.

More videos here, including "an amazing low-level through the Cascades that pilots call 'The Million-Dollar Ride.'"

As for me, you can find me here. Thanks, Boingers!

Rampaging toilet terrorizes children

Susannah Breslin is a guestblogger on Boing Boing. She is a freelance journalist who blogs at Reverse Cowgirl and is at work on a novel set in the adult movie industry.

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Apparently, Colorado's Denver Water is trying to get people to make sure that they don't overuse their toilets, or some such thing. No running toilets. No excessive flushing. No leaky toilets. That's what I gather, at least.

So, I guess they have some kind of toilet mascot? The "Running Toilet"? That pretty much amounts to a man in a toilet suit? Which sounds sort of unpleasant?

According to The Latest Word, Mr. Toilet got all crazy last weekend and bum-rushed a big water fountain where a bunch of kids were playing, spreading its "Use Only What You Need" toilet message hither and yon, while the kids were trying to play.

I don't think the toilet meant to scare them, but you have to admit that a giant toilet appearing out of nowhere and running through the fountain is a bit weird.

Agreed. Don't let the toilet terrorists win, kiddies, or we all lose. (Via Copyranter. Image via The Latest Word.)

Bonus link dedicated to Xeni "MJFan4RVR" Jardin: Toiletman moonwalking.

The Valley

Susannah Breslin is a guestblogger on Boing Boing. She is a freelance journalist who blogs at Reverse Cowgirl and is at work on a novel set in the adult movie industry.

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I took these photos on the set of an adult movie in the San Fernando Valley this April. It was April 10th, to be exact. Which is my birthday. Why I was on the set of an adult movie on my birthday is another story altogether. The story of my life.

The location was a hideous brown building in Canoga Park, not far from Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, where rocket engines are built and in front of which sits a giant rocket engine as if it has fallen out of the sky. Both sides of the soundstage were lined with themed rooms: a shower room, a weight room, a sex dungeon. That day's scene would take place on one of the ugliest adult movie sets that I have ever seen: pea soup-colored walls, a diarrhea-colored leather sofa, a faux wood floor. All the flowers were fake.

The name of the movie was "Interactive Sex with Tori Black." The director explained: "We were going to go with 'Existential Musings of a Porn Star,' but we thought we'd dumb it down. If you want to have sex with Tori Black and don't have chloroform, this is your next best option."

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Condition: Critical: Children of the Democratic Republic of Congo Speak

Susannah Breslin is a guestblogger on Boing Boing. She is a freelance journalist who blogs at Reverse Cowgirl and is at work on a novel set in the adult movie industry.

Condition: Critical is an amazing website that focuses on those affected by the ongoing war in eastern Congo. The site was created by Médecins Sans Frontières, otherwise known as Doctors Without Borders, an international medical humanitarian organization that works in 60 countries around the world to combat the tragic consequences of war, violence, and famine.

Condition: Critical turns the spotlight on war-torn North and South Kivu with videos, photos, and first-person testimonies from the men, women, children, and medical relief workers who are experiencing what is happening there firsthand.

Life isn't just hard in eastern Congo: this region is in critical condition. And things aren't getting any better. The destiny of everyone in this region is shaped by war and violence. The story of their struggle to survive needs to be told.

(Jeffrey Gettleman has been doing a remarkable job of chronicling the war for The New York Times. He reported on the use of rape as a war tactic in the DRC here and here.)

A new video series on Condition: Critical brings to life the tragedies being inflicted upon the region's children. In "Survive," "Express," and "Fight," we hear from children who are struggling to survive the conflict around them.

If you'd like to donate to MSF, you can do so here. The MSF YouTube channel is here.

Condition: Critical.

Dan Witz' "Dark Doings"

Susannah Breslin is a guestblogger on Boing Boing. She is a freelance journalist who blogs at Reverse Cowgirl and is at work on a novel set in the adult movie industry.

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What are you doing this summer? Artist Dan Witz is creating a New York City street art series that he calls Dark Doings.

He tells Wooster Collective:

"I don't think I've ever been as excited as I am about this work I'm doing now... I'm calling it, "Dark Doings", inspired by my recent time in Amsterdam's red light district."

Dark Doings.

The art of horse puppetry

Susannah Breslin is a guestblogger on Boing Boing. She is a freelance journalist who blogs at Reverse Cowgirl and is at work on a novel set in the adult movie industry.

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The New York Times has a story on these beautiful horse "puppets" that appear in a play in London called War Horse: "Making Horses Gallop and Audiences Cry."

The horses are seven feet tall, and each requires three human puppeteers working within the body of the puppet to tell the story of an impoverished British boy who loses his horse to a British officer who rides the beast to battle in World War I.

The ears of the horses, for instance, are driven by bicycle brake cables and are capable of a 180-degree sweep. The tail is controlled by three cables acting as tendons, producing a movement based on the actual anatomy of a horse. And the curling of the lower leg and hoof, as the horse raises its leg, is controlled by so-called passive tendons, loose cables that are moved first by the puppeteers and then by sheer gravity.

What makes the horse puppets seem truly alive is the way they appear to breathe -- an accomplishment that Mr. Kohler described as "a complicated effect that ended in a simple solution."

"Because the spine of the horses is supported by backpacks worn by the puppeteers inside, the chest manipulator" -- the puppeteer handling the chest and front legs -- "simply has to bend and straighten his knees, allowing the torso of the horse to raise and lower," simulating breathing, Mr. Kohler said.

Making Horses Gallop and Audiences Cry. (Image credit: Andrew Testa/The New York Times.)