Watch this osprey catch a trout in super slo-mo

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From the BBC series The Highlands, narrated by Ewan McGregor. From their site: Read the rest

Beautiful animation about human origins

Design studio Kurzgesagt's latest fantastic "In a Nutshell" animation explores the origin of humanity and "What Happened Before History."

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Converse All-Stars with built in Wah Wah pedal

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Converse is marketing Chuck Taylors with a built in Wah Wah pedal. Here is guitarist J. Mascis, of Dinosaur Jr. fame, trying them out.

The only electric effect I much care for is reverb. Read the rest

Paynie shows us Lightning in a Bottle 2016

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I love how this fantastic short film, by Stephen "Paynie" Payne, conveys the feel of an 1960s festival home movie.

Paynie also curates Oddville, a fantastic gallery in Downtown LA. Read the rest

People are watching TV at 160% speed to fit in all their shows

Image: Dani Johnson, Amy King / The Washington Post

Jeff Guo of Washington Post's Wonkblog says he watches all his television shows at 160% speed. Above a clip from ABC's Modern Family sped up the way Guo views it.

For years, podcast and audiobook players have provided speedup options, and research shows that most people prefer listening to accelerated speech.

In recent years, software has made it much easier to perform the same operation on videos. This was impossible for home viewers in the age of VHS. But computers can now easily speed up any video you throw at them. You can play DVDs and iTunes purchases at whatever tempo you like. YouTube allows you select a speedup factor on its player. And a Google engineer has written a popular Chrome extension that accelerates most other Web videos, including on Netflix, Vimeo and Amazon Prime.

Over 100,000 people have downloaded that plug-in, and the reviews are ecstatic. “Oh my God! I regret all the wasted time I've lived before finding this gem!!” one user wrote.

Image: Dani Johnson, Amy King / The Washington Post Read the rest

Boston Dynamics shows new quadruped robots, including one with a head

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Creepy/cool robot shop Boston Dynamics introduced the new SpotMini, a 55 pound robot that seems perfect for indoor use. YouTube description:

SpotMini is a new smaller version of the Spot robot that weighs 55 lbs dripping wet (65 lbs if you include its arm.) SpotMini is all-electric (no hydraulics) and runs for about 90 minutes on a charge, depending on what it is doing. SpotMini is one of the quietest robots we have ever built. It has a variety of sensors, including depth cameras, a solid state gyro (IMU) and proprioception sensors in the limbs. These sensors help with navigation and mobile manipulation. SpotMini performs some tasks autonomously, but often uses a human for high-level guidance

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Flashback: The immortal Gene Gene the Dancing Machine

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If someone asks what it was like to grow up watching TV in the 1970s, send them these clips from The Gong Show. Chuck Barris and Gene Gene the Dancing Machine were about the only unexpected thing on daytime TV. Read the rest

Kick-ass flamenco ukulele shredding

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Taimane, backed by Jonathan and Jazzy, perform at a benefit on Hawai'i's north shore for Music in Elementary Schools -- Tamaine performs her signature flamenco uke style, which goes well beyond gimmick and into a badass, shredding marvel that is as fantastic to watch as it is to listen to. Read the rest

Death-defying wooden cliff path gets scarier as it goes

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If your palms are too dry, this helmetcam from the Mount Huashan plank path might help. Best part? It's a two-way path, so one hiker has to swing out and around anyone going the other way. Read the rest

The "dead parent test" for effective movie dialogue

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From the Now You See It YouTube channel: "What makes dialogue work? Let's explore the power of dialogue in film and take a look at the offensively named 'Dead Parent Test.'" Read the rest

Learn to make your bed the military way

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Fort Knox Army Drill Sergeant Shane Medders explains how to make a bed the right way, with hospital corners.

Also, Core 77 interviewed NYC-based photographer, speaker and on-camera coach Michael Cinquino, who was a Petty Officer Third Class on the fast combat support ship U.S.S. Detroit:

What was the procedure?

You had a set amount of time to make the bed properly, starting from scratch each time--

Sorry, what do you mean by "from scratch?"

You had to rip all of the sheets off and put them in a pile on top of the bed, and start from there.

How did they enforce that?

The drill instructor's standing right there, supervising.

Why make you start from scratch every time?

It was to teach attention to detail. To go through the whole process and teach you that executing little details correctly matters. As a sailor, if you screw up a detail, people can get killed. So the pillow's got to be centered, the catch-hem has to be pointing up, the fold a certain distance, et cetera.

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Watch this giant octopus kite take flight

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Show Kites Singapore flew this 200-foot custom-built octopus kite that requires six people to launch and control. Read the rest

Video: Guys whose boss made them illegally dump hazardous chemicals in the desert

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On March 3, a worker shot this video of him and his co-workers illegally pouring HOCUT 795-B out on the Nevada desert floor, then burning out the residue, at the insistence of their (unnamed) employer. Read the rest

Curious gentleman destroys museum piece

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This inquisitive fellow was unable to keep his hands off a delicate museum piece hanging from the wall at the National Watch & Clock Museum. After breaking it, he lost interest and walked away, leaving his companion to clean up the mess. Read the rest

Hacker puppets explain how camera angles shape our perception

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Gus the hacker puppeteer (previously) writes, "Since The Media Show began, people have been asking us, 'What do hacking, digital literacy, and media literacy have to do with each other? I don't see the connection.'" Read the rest

Why it is a very bad idea to keep a lynx as a pet

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Nehala says: This is "what happens when someone mail-orders a lynx, which ends up destructively urinating all over the small apartment, is maladjusted, and is terrified of visitors, or in this case, a housesitter." Read the rest

Trippy animated zoom video makes everything you see in the real world recede

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After watching Ben Ridgway's "Continuum Infinitum" video, everything I looked at seemed to recede for a while. Ben recommends downloading the video and looping it.

As you watch the movie for a minute or so and then look away, you will experience a mild optical illusion that feels as if everything you look at is shrinking away from you. This is caused by the motion after-effect (MAE). It is a visual illusion experienced after viewing a moving visual stimulus for a time (tens of milliseconds to minutes) with stationary eyes, and then fixating on a stationary stimulus. The stationary stimulus appears to move in the opposite direction to the original (physically moving) stimulus. The motion aftereffect is believed to be the result of motion adaptation.

Neurons coding a particular movement reduce their responses with time of exposure to a constantly moving stimulus; this is neural adaptation. Neural adaptation also reduces the spontaneous, baseline activity of these same neurons when responding to a stationary stimulus. One theory is that perception of stationary objects, for example rocks beside a waterfall, is coded as the balance among the baseline responses of neurons coding all possible directions of motion. Neural adaptation of neurons stimulated by downwards movement reduces their baseline activity, tilting the balance in favor of upwards movement.

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