A Shareable Future: Creative Commons at 12 years

Twelve years ago, Creative Commons made a big bet. We saw that the internet had transformed the ways in which people create, distribute, and consume content. And we believed that what it meant to be a creator was going to shift in a big way.

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Make guitar picks from any flat plastic

As an amateur guitar player, this is a fantastic tool that allows me to achieve the following:

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Photo of a monstrous hole swallowing a neighborhood

This giant hole is the result of water flowing into a salt mine in Russia. When the soil started shifting in 2005, the government shut off power to the area to encourage residents to leave.

On Tuesday, the mines were evacuated due to shifting earth, and the hole opened up on Tuesday evening. Russian authorities are studying the scene and performing air quality tests to determine whether noxious gasses are being released.

There Goes the Neighborhood

Utah may cut off NSA's water in protest of mass surveillance

An aerial view of the NSA's Utah data center, taken by activists with the Electronic Frontier Foundation .


An aerial view of the NSA's Utah data center, taken by activists with the Electronic Frontier Foundation .

In Utah, where the largest National Security Agency data center is located, a state legislative committee will soon consider a bill that could cut off millions of gallons of water for the NSA facility south of Salt Lake City.

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Firefox switches default search from Google to Yahoo


In some ways, it's the inevitable outcome of Google's increased focus on Chrome and Yahoo's increased focus on getting anyone, anywhere to care about it before it runs out of money.

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Motion picture legend Mike Nichols, 1931-2014.

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Entertainment icon Mike Nichols died suddenly Wednesday at the age of 83. He is best known as the director of films including “The Graduate” (1967) which won an Academy Award.

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What happens inside musicians' brains when they play?

Basically, brain fireworks.

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First attempt at around-the-world solar-powered flight to take off from Abu Dhabi in March, 2015

A photo from a recent test flight of the Solar Impulse aircraft.


A photo from a recent test flight of the Solar Impulse aircraft.

Solar Impulse is described as “the only airplane of perpetual endurance, able to fly day and night on solar power, without a drop of fuel.” With support from Masdar, Abu Dhabi’s renewable energy company, the Solar Impulse team will attempt the first-ever solar-powered flight around the world in March, 2015. The long-range aircraft project was founded by Bertrand Piccard, a Swiss psychiatrist and aeronaut who co-piloted the first balloon to circle the world non-stop, and Swiss businessman André Borschberg.

From a New York Times article on the Abu Dhabi connection:

The Solar Impulse experimental flight program is one of a slew of international projects in which Masdar has invested, reinforcing its status as a pioneer in solar energy innovation.

“We wanted to demonstrate the viability of this revolutionary clean technology,” said Ahmad Belhoul, who took over as chief executive of Masdar, a unit of Mubadala, the Abu Dhabi government’s investment arm, in March. “There have been successful internal flights, but the idea is to have global travel that is exclusively powered by solar energy.”

The plan is to span the globe, crossing the world’s major oceans in flights lasting up to five days at a time. The total trip is expected to take about four months.

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Experiments in mapping the intangible

I never tire of the conceptual trick of applying the metaphor of a map onto something non-geographical.

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More than 80% of California is still in extreme drought, and the near future looks dry.

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More than 80% of California remains in a state of extreme drought, according to an update from the U.S. Drought Monitor, and things aren't expected to get better in the near future. At the Los Angeles Times, a graphic shows the progression of the drought from 2011 through today.

Why are starfish “melting” from viral wasting disease? Maybe it's our fault.

This photo released by the Rocky Intertidal Lab at the University of California-Santa Cruz shows a starfish suffering from 'sea star wasting disease.' (Laura Anderson / Rocky Intertidal Lab UC Santa Cruz)


This photo released by the Rocky Intertidal Lab at the University of California-Santa Cruz shows a starfish suffering from 'sea star wasting disease.' (Laura Anderson / Rocky Intertidal Lab UC Santa Cruz)

Marine biology researchers investigating the virus linked to the “wasting” deaths of countless starfish are looking at what role environmental causes might play in the massive die-off.

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WATCH: New York City Food Warriors explore the sweet eats of Harlem's 125th Street

The Internets Celebrities (Dallas Penn, Rafi Kam, and director Casimir Nozkowski) explore the culinary delights of 125th Street in New York City, where Old Harlem meets New Harlem.

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What do your “keepsake passwords,” the ones drawn from life experience, say about you?

PasswordsFew things are as universally despised as passwords. The strains they put on our memory, the endless demand to update them, their sheer number. But there is more to passwords than their annoyance. In our authorship of them, in the fact that we construct them so that we (and only we) will remember them, they take on secret lives.

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Bill Cosby speaks to Associated Press on allegations he is a serial rapist

“With sexual assault allegations gaining increasing attention, The Associated Press reviewed an on camera interview with Bill Cosby earlier this month and made the decision to publish his full reaction to questions about the claims.” [YouTube]