Steve McQueen motorcycle epic that never was but soon will be

Snip from NYT story by Paul Cullum:

When Steve McQueen died 25 years ago in Juarez, Mexico, he left behind two children, some 30 movies and a legacy as "The King of Cool" (the title of a documentary about him). He also left behind two custom-made trunks containing 16 leather-bound notebooks full of drawings, photographs from period magazines, and a detailed script continuity – a screenplay without dialogue – written in a kind of hyper-stylized poetry. These materials were his plans for "Yucatan," the vanity project he yearned, but failed, to make.

A heist film and adventure epic, it would have married the sprawling canvas of films like "The Great Escape" and "Papillon" with the chase-scene histrionics of "Bullitt" (transferred to motorcycles, McQueen's lifelong passion) along with some ancient history and visionary science thrown in for good measure. reg-free Link Read the rest

NYC: Where are all the US Census race definitions at?

Comic artist Dorothy Gambrell (of Cat and Girl fame) whipped up some nifty maps of New York City that show ethnicity concentrations throughout the area based on 2000 census data. Where are all the White / Black / Asian / Latino people at, you ask? Link. (Thanks, Matt Winchll)

Previously: Dorothy Gambrell pie charts Google's "necessary" things Read the rest

Mobile ad

Cramped movie marquee makes for funny titles

Stefan Jones says: "One of the local (Beaverton, OR) movie theaters is a dowdy, badly located concrete box from the beginning of the multiplex era.

"The Regal Cinemas chain shows some special interest films there, plus popular films nearing the end of their run. The marquee space is severly limited, resulting in sublime concatanations like the one shown in the picture." Read the rest

Katrina: anecdote on civil defense in Cuba (often sans phones, power)

Ned Sublette says:
I just spoke to nelson valdes, a walking encyclopedia of knowledge about cuba, and asked him how civil defense is conducted in cuba. he ticked it off while i listened with my left hand and typed with my right. here are the notes i took:

* * *

less than 2 months ago, cuba was able to move 1.7 million people on short notice.

the whole civil defense is embedded in the community to begin with. people know ahead of time where they are to go.

they come to your door and knock, and tell you, evacuation is coming, then they come and tell you, now.

if no electricity, they have runners who communicate from a headquarters to central locations what is to be done.

the country's leaders go on TV and take charge. but not only the leaders are speaking. the TV weatherpeople are knowledgeable. and the population is well educated about hurricanes.

they not only evacuate. it's arranged beforehand where they will go, who has family where. not only pickup is organized, delivery of people is organized.

merely sticking them in a stadium is unthinkable. shelters all have medical personnel, from the neighborhood. they have family doctors in cuba (!), who evacuate together with the neighborhood, and already know who, for example, needs insulin.

if they evacuate to a countryside high school -- a last resort -- they have dormitories there.

they also have veterinarians and they evacuate animals. they begin evacuating immediately, and also evacuate TV sets and refrigerators, so that people aren't relucatant to leave because people might steal their stuff.

Read the rest

Cat and Girl comic on modern art

Cat and Girl saddle up to the bar for a comic send-up of contemporary/avant-garde art called "Where is the Little Andres Serranos Room?" Link (Thanks, Professor Cupcake!) Read the rest

Bumper sticker: "My other car is a Pynchon novel"

Available from the Cat and Girl comic's online store, along with gothic script t-shirts that say, "Capitalists do it Ruthlessly." Link (via Bruce Sterling) Read the rest

A quick Mole's fast food

Star-nosed moles detect an edible treat like an insect larva or worm and gulp it down faster than the human eye can follow. Researchers at Vanderbilt University timed the moles' actiosn as part of a new study published in this week's issue of the scientific journal Nature. From the press release:
(Biologist Kenneth) Catania, working with laboratory assistant Fiona E. Remple, captured the elusive moles' feeding behavior with a high-speed video camera. Because they live in darkness, the moles have very poor eyesight. So they continually survey their environment by repeatedly touching the objects around them with their star appendages. Timing the moles' actions, the researchers found that after touching a small piece of food they took an average of 230 milliseconds to identify it as edible and eat it.... "The star-nose has the strangest teeth," Catania says. Its incisors are very small compared to other moles and are formed like tweezers. "This allows them to grasp small prey very precisely," he says.
Link Read the rest
Mobile ad

Cat and Girl

Cat and Girl is a great net comic-strip. Link Discuss (Thanks, Stefan!) Read the rest