Wigglegrams - 3D images that need no glasses

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Coke Truck image: Bob Weisz

The Wigglegram subreddit has oodles of examples of 3D GIF images made by taking photos from different vantage points and looping them.

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Stonehenge: bgrnbrg
Exploding Ocean [OC] from wigglegrams
Exploding Ocean: Bob Weisz
Yosemite Raven - 3D GIF [Nishika N8000 - Portra 400] from analog
Yosemite Raven: 90harper

Here's a barely SFW video made of wigglegrams: Read the rest

Explore Don Draper's apartment in 3D

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Archilogic, an online architecture viewer/editor designed to be easier for laypersons to use and share from than Sketchup, is spectacular stuff... at least on a fast computer. You can upload plans and convert them to 3D, move and replace furniture, mess around with the layout, push the results to friends or real estate agents, and so on. Some of the demos posted to the company's blog are fascinating: exploring Don Draper's apartment in the first-person is eerily voyeuristic. An unbuilt Frank Lloyd Wright design is more majestic and less, well, sleazy.

Now do the Overlook Hotel! Read the rest

Turn drone footage into 3D terrain models, which you can 3D print

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Drone Deploy is an analytics and automation package that uses drones to create accurate 3D terrain and architectural models. Read the rest

Naked squishy people falling down

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Once you've got a human-shaped 3D model that you've imbued with a suitably squishy physics, what do you do? You could torture thousands of them in a virtual infernal device straight out of The Wasp Factory, but why bother when you can strip them naked and drop them in perfect columns? (via Kottke) Read the rest

Listen to the sounds of 18th century Paris

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Musicologist Mylène Pardoen and a team of 3D artists created this "sonic tableaux" of 18th century Paris based on a 1781 map and numerous historical documents and research on what Paris's Grand Châtelet district, between the Pont au Change and Pont Notre Dame bridges, may have sounded like at the time. From the French National Center for Scientific Research:

“I chose that neighborhood because it concentrates 80% of the background sound environments of Paris in that era, whether through familiar trades—shopkeepers, craftsmen, boatmen, washerwomen on the banks of the Seine, etc.—or the diversity of acoustic possibilities, like the echo heard under a bridge or in a covered passageway,” Pardoen explains. While historical videos with soundtracks are nothing new, this is the first 3D reconstitution based solely on a sonic background: the quality of the sounds (muffled, amplified…) takes into account the heights of the buildings and their construction materials (stone, cob etc.).

This urban soundscape was recreated based on documents from the period, including Le Tableau de Paris, published in 1781 by Louis-Sebastien Mercier, and the work of historians like Arlette Farge, a specialist on the 18th century, Alain Corbin, known for his research on the history of the senses, and Youri Carbonnier, an authority on houses built on bridges. The audio tour includes sounds like the cackling of birds in the poultry market, the hum of flies drawn to the fishmongers’ stalls, the sound of the loom at the woollen mill that used to stand at one end of the Pont au Change, that of the scrapers in the tanneries on Rue de la Pelleterie, of typesetting at the print shop on Rue de Gesvres… all overlaid with the incessant cries of the seagulls that came to feed on the city’s heaps of waste....

Read the rest

iPhone app makes 3D Gifs you don't need glasses to enjoy

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I've seen this kind of jittery-but-effective 3D effect before. In fact, you can take old stereoscope cards and make looping Gifs with the two images. A new iPhone app called Slide uses the same principle, but takes out the grunt work. Read the rest

3D printer company Makerbot lays off 20% of its workers all over again

MakerBot 3-D printer at  CeBit computer fair in Germany. [Reuters]

The only 3D printing company anyone’s heard of,” MakerBot, is laying off 20 percent of its staff for the second time in the last six months. Read the rest

3D maps of London Underground stations

The axonometric, not-to-scale diagrams are pretty sweet -- like the castings made of underground ant-colonies, cross with the insane arcology furutism of Paolo Soleri. Read the rest

Dream Recollection Inducer

“Dream Recollection Inducer (GIF Format)—To gaze at shortly after waking.” By ZBAGS. Read the rest

WATCH: 3D-printed robotic spider dress teases the future of responsive fashion

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If you're at CES, Friday is the last day to see this 3D-printed robotic spider dress in action. Read the rest

Open-source 3D scans of museum items generate amazing new creative works

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Artist Oliver Laric worked with the Usher Gallery and The Collection in Lincoln to create 3D scans of their collections, then made the files available online. The art that emerged is varied and sometimes astonishing, like the work above by Leah Ferrini. Read the rest

First-person shooter engine in 265 lines of Javascript

Hunter Loftis, who created the fractal terrain generation in 130 lines of Javascript engine, has done it again: a a full-blown first-person shooter engine in 265 lines (demo, source). He used a technique called ray casting, and goes into some detail about this choice and where this could go next. Read the rest

Was the Mona Lisa meant to be 3D?

Was the Mona Lisa one of the earliest 3D artworks? Scientists studying the painting and a slightly different version possibly painted by Da Vinci or his students think the intent might have been to create a stereoscopic pair. From Discovery News:

(The University of Bamberg researchers) found that the horizontal difference between the two paintings was about 2.7 inches (69 millimeters), which is close to the average distance between a person's two eyes. (When a person observes an object, each eye sees a slightly different perspective of the object, both of which are sent to the brain and transformed into the three-dimensional representation of the object that we "see.")

(Discovery News, thanks Bob Pescovitz!) Read the rest

Praying mantises wearing 3D glasses

Newcastle University researchers outfitted praying mantises with tiny 3D glasses to better understand the evolution of vision, and potentially improve computer image processing. I wonder if they gave the mantises a headache like they do me. (Thanks, Ari Pescovitz!) Read the rest

Diableries: Stereoscopic Adventures in Hell (book review)

Diableries: Stereoscopic Adventures in Hell centers on a beautiful, reprinted collection of diabolical 1860s French stereoscopic cards. On each card is an image of a detailed, intricate clay diorama depicting life in hell. Each card tells a story, but the story of the collection itself is far more interesting.

Read the rest

Futuristic armor for organs

Viaframe's renders of armor for your organs are sure pretty. I think they'd be a little terminal for everyday use, but they'd make great canopic storage for the old burial chamber-oonie. Read the rest

BBC cans 3D broadcasts

"The BBC is to suspend 3D programming for an indefinite period due to a 'lack of public appetite' for the technology." [BBC] Read the rest

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