Make crazy 3D houses with Brick Block

Oskar Stalberg (previously) made Brick Block, a fun online 3D toy that lets you design surreal blocky houses. You can spin the scene to any degree and have it generate random houses. It's like the level editor for a Victorian-themed version of the classic cyberpunk game Syndicate.

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Unmarked assault rifle sales land CNC-mill gunsmith in prison

Americans can legally manufacture an assault rifle for personal use without registering it, so Daniel Crowninshield figured his paying customers could push the button to start his milling equipment and claim they made the AR-15 themselves. Feds disagreed.

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"Hyperbolic tiling": can you escape from an extradimensional prison?

The only thing at Hypernom.com appears to be a 3D fractal cage. You can move toward the edge with the WASD and arrow keys. But as you approach it, a new level of detail pops in and you seem no closer to the perimeter. Approached as a game, there is a "trick" to escaping—but I'm not sure you're supposed to. Press numbers to change the forms that bind you. There are all sorts of things going on like this. Read the rest

Artist creates dimensional scenes on old plates by precisely sandblasting through successive layers

Caroline Slotte is a sculptor in Finland who layers old, decorated china plates atop one another, then carefully removes material from successive layers with precision masking and sandblasting and carving, created 3D scenes with gorgeous depth. Read the rest

Shun the parallax Bandersnatch!

By Grim Aesthetics (via Wil Wheaton) Read the rest

Mario drawn in crayon

Redditor enzyme69 used Blender to generate a picture of Mario "drawn" in crayon; this should be a thing. [via r/GenerativeArt] Read the rest

Documentary on North Korea's love of 3D photographs

North Koreans have a fondness for lenticular postcards and stereoscopic keepsakes, and they granted Slovenian photographer Matjaž Tančič rare access to create a series of 3D photographs of North Korean daily life. Read the rest

Modelling Borges's Library of Babel in Sketchup

Jorge Luis Borges's short story The Library of Babel describes an infinite library containing all possible books ("its polished surfaces represent and promise the infinite ... Light is provided by some spherical fruit which bear the name of lamps"). Read the rest

Impressive 3D projection mapping animation "Resistance"

Eugene Pylinsky (aka Pylik) put together this outsized 3D modeling animation to be projected on a pillared facade. The result uses the space in creative and surprising ways. Read the rest

Wigglegrams - 3D images that need no glasses

Coke Truck image: Bob Weisz

The Wigglegram subreddit has oodles of examples of 3D GIF images made by taking photos from different vantage points and looping them.

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Stonehenge: bgrnbrg
Exploding Ocean [OC] from wigglegrams
Exploding Ocean: Bob Weisz
Yosemite Raven - 3D GIF [Nishika N8000 - Portra 400] from analog
Yosemite Raven: 90harper

Here's a barely SFW video made of wigglegrams: Read the rest

Explore Don Draper's apartment in 3D

Archilogic, an online architecture viewer/editor designed to be easier for laypersons to use and share from than Sketchup, is spectacular stuff... at least on a fast computer. You can upload plans and convert them to 3D, move and replace furniture, mess around with the layout, push the results to friends or real estate agents, and so on. Some of the demos posted to the company's blog are fascinating: exploring Don Draper's apartment in the first-person is eerily voyeuristic. An unbuilt Frank Lloyd Wright design is more majestic and less, well, sleazy.

Now do the Overlook Hotel! Read the rest

Turn drone footage into 3D terrain models, which you can 3D print

Drone Deploy is an analytics and automation package that uses drones to create accurate 3D terrain and architectural models. Read the rest

Naked squishy people falling down

Once you've got a human-shaped 3D model that you've imbued with a suitably squishy physics, what do you do? You could torture thousands of them in a virtual infernal device straight out of The Wasp Factory, but why bother when you can strip them naked and drop them in perfect columns? (via Kottke) Read the rest

Listen to the sounds of 18th century Paris

Musicologist Mylène Pardoen and a team of 3D artists created this "sonic tableaux" of 18th century Paris based on a 1781 map and numerous historical documents and research on what Paris's Grand Châtelet district, between the Pont au Change and Pont Notre Dame bridges, may have sounded like at the time. From the French National Center for Scientific Research:

“I chose that neighborhood because it concentrates 80% of the background sound environments of Paris in that era, whether through familiar trades—shopkeepers, craftsmen, boatmen, washerwomen on the banks of the Seine, etc.—or the diversity of acoustic possibilities, like the echo heard under a bridge or in a covered passageway,” Pardoen explains. While historical videos with soundtracks are nothing new, this is the first 3D reconstitution based solely on a sonic background: the quality of the sounds (muffled, amplified…) takes into account the heights of the buildings and their construction materials (stone, cob etc.).

This urban soundscape was recreated based on documents from the period, including Le Tableau de Paris, published in 1781 by Louis-Sebastien Mercier, and the work of historians like Arlette Farge, a specialist on the 18th century, Alain Corbin, known for his research on the history of the senses, and Youri Carbonnier, an authority on houses built on bridges. The audio tour includes sounds like the cackling of birds in the poultry market, the hum of flies drawn to the fishmongers’ stalls, the sound of the loom at the woollen mill that used to stand at one end of the Pont au Change, that of the scrapers in the tanneries on Rue de la Pelleterie, of typesetting at the print shop on Rue de Gesvres… all overlaid with the incessant cries of the seagulls that came to feed on the city’s heaps of waste....

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iPhone app makes 3D Gifs you don't need glasses to enjoy

I've seen this kind of jittery-but-effective 3D effect before. In fact, you can take old stereoscope cards and make looping Gifs with the two images. A new iPhone app called Slide uses the same principle, but takes out the grunt work. Read the rest

3D printer company Makerbot lays off 20% of its workers all over again

The only 3D printing company anyone’s heard of,” MakerBot, is laying off 20 percent of its staff for the second time in the last six months. Read the rest

3D maps of London Underground stations

The axonometric, not-to-scale diagrams are pretty sweet -- like the castings made of underground ant-colonies, cross with the insane arcology furutism of Paolo Soleri. Read the rest

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