Submit a link Features Reviews Podcasts Video Forums More ▾

Autodesk's 123D Creature lets you design and order 3D prints of monsters you design

Autodesk's 123D Creature is an iPad app that lets you design a monster and then order a 3D print for home delivery. The app costs $2 and I just bought it. Looking forward to trying it out with Jane tonight!


Create a skeleton
Add joints and create limbs to build up your 3D character in digital clay. Reposition, pose, and scale limbs; and adjust your creature's shape.

Decorate
Add surface details using the sculpting tools, then use the airbrush to paint on color or use image paint add realistic details by to rubbing areas of a photo onto your 3D creature.

Export and share
Bring your 3D creature into the render room to generate amazing images to share with your friends. Use the in-app printing service to order a 3D print of your creature, or export your 3D model complete with textures.

123D Creature

(Via Adafruit Industries)

Recreating 19th-century face jugs with 3D scanning and printing technology


(MSOE staff member Jordan Weston shows the finished rapid-prototyped piece constructed of sintered nylon.)

The face vessels made by African-Americans 150 years ago in Edgefield, South Carolina, might have been small, but they told big stories -- stories of cultural movement, human survival, spiritualism and technological prowess, according to Jon Prown, director for the Chipstone Foundation.

Under curator Claudia Mooney, Chipstone has created Face Jugs: Art and Ritual in 19th-Century South Carolina, an exhibition that opens at the Birmingham (Alabama) Museum of Art on January 13, 2013.

(The original 19th-century face jug from Edgefield, South Carolina. Courtesy of the Chipstone Foundation.)

The exhibit, which originated at the Milwaukee Art Museum and was also on display at the Columbia Museum of Art in South Carolina, has a modern story to tell as well -- one that demonstrates the power of 3D technology to eliminate geographical barriers and preserve culture for future generations.

Read the rest

Cool handheld 3D scanner

How soon before we hear rumblings in Congress that cool handheld 3-D scanners like this need to be tightly regulated, lest they get into the hands of manufacturers of knockoff goods?

Read the rest

Object Breast Cancer: visualizing tumors through art

Above, one of the bronze sculptures to emerge from the Object Breast Cancer project by art duo caraballo-farman. Snip from the project description:

1.3 Million women in the world are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. For most, the tumor has no image. It’s an invisible monster, an unseen malignancy.

OBJECT BREAST CANCER (OBC) is based on the conviction that artistic interventions can have important social and psychological effects. The project includes sculptural and installation work as well as jewelry.

I'm going through treatment for breast cancer right now, and man, this notion of an invisible monster within is something I can definitely relate to.

I don't know that I'd want to wear jewelry made from a model of the mass we're trying to eliminate inside me, but there is something primordially satisfying in the idea of being able to clearly see the contours, shape, size, and character of this thing.

I always ask for a copy of my data when I get medical scans related to my cancer treatment, and it would be really interesting to take the "before chemotherapy"/"after chemotherapy" scans and see if I could get a 3D printout of the cancerous mass, as it (science willing!) shrinks. Not that I'd want to look at it all the time, you know? But I really would like to just see the goddamned thing, and understand it, visually. Once.

The "worry bead" design is brilliant. I could sure use one of these to fondle and fret over during chemo.

(thanks, Chelsea!)