Solving Laugh Out Loud Cats #2100

Apelad sez, "I posted the 2100th Laugh-Out-Loud Cats comic last night. My kids had me print it out so they could cut out each panel to try and recreate the tunnel route. It's not easy!"

Laugh-Out-Loud Cats #2100 Read the rest

Five more books join the Humble Ebook Bundle!

We've hit the halfway mark on the Humble Ebook Bundle, a name-your-price, support-for-charity, DRM-free ebook promotion. With one week to go, we've added in FIVE more books: XKCD Volume 0; Zach Weiner's Save Yourself, Mammal and The Most Dangerous Game; Penny Arcade: Attack of the Bacon Robots; and Penny Arcade: Epic Legends of the Magic Sword Kings.

If you've already bought the bundle and paid more than the average, these are unlocked and ready for you to download. If you're new to the bundle, you have seven days to buy these ones. Don't miss out!

Update: Derp -- misunderstood who got the new titles! If you've paid, they're yours.

Humble Ebook Bundle Read the rest

A crowdfunded doc on Rick Griffin, pop surrealist comics and psychedelic art legend

Digging this film Kickstarter, and by the looks of the amount they've raised so far, others do too: “Griffin,” a feature-length documentary exploring "the art, life and eccentric spark of one of the world’s least known and most influential 20th Century surrealists," Rick Griffin. "Over the time-warped span of the 1960's, [the] one-time teen cartoonist created defining icons for three pillars of west coast counterculture: surfing, psychedelic rock and underground comix." Check it out. Related, this amazing comic retelling of Griffin's life by Simon Rouse (PDF Link). Dig this previous BB post on the artist's legacy. (Kickstarter, thanks DC!)

Read the rest

Awesome NYCC panel: Comics Pros and Film Buffs - When Fanboys Collide

(Video link) One of the really fun panels I attended at New York Comic Con discussed a subject with which I'm very familiar: comic book movies, and being a comics fan versus a movies fan. While I dig and respect comic books, I'm definitely in the latter camp. At the panel Comics Pros and Film Buffs: When Fanboys Collide, moderated by John Siuntres of the Word Balloon podcast, a lively discussion took place on how comic book movies impact the comic book industry, but also some less popular movies based on comic books. Bash Brannigan, anyone? Read the rest

Little Nemo, the Google Doodle edition

Normally, I'm pretty blase about Google Doodles, but today's Doodle pays homage to Winsor McCay's Little Nemo, with a beautiful, pitch-perfect animated series of "Adventures in Google-Land" that you really must see (even the large graphic excerpt here doesn't do it justice, you have to get the animations to get the full effect).

The gigantic Little Nemo collections (Little Nemo in Slumberland and Little Nemo in Slumberland: So Many Splendid Sundays) remain two of my most cherished collections, revealing the full majesty of McCay's imagination by reproducing his original strips at full size. The Google Doodle isn't as humongous as the books, but what it lacks in size it makes up for with lovely animation.

If you're a McCay fan, don't miss the Little Sammy Sneeze collection.

Little Nemo in Google-Land Read the rest

Action Philosophers: philosophy of the ages in comic form

Action Philosophers is a delightful and educational comic created by Fred Van Lente and Ryan Dunlavey, presented as a series of vignettes that explain the biographies and ideas of the philosophers through the ages. I stopped by their booth today at New York Comic-Con after being struck by their very funny Karl Marx vs Ayn Rand poster and went back to my room to read the free preview. I'm sold!

Action Philosophers Read the rest

Comic superheroes re-imagined as Ottoman Empire figures

"Ottoman was Geeky," a fanciful series of illustrations by Berk Senturk. Above, Justice League as Fevc-ül Adâlet. Read the rest

Some highlights from NY Comic-Con

I'm at Comic-Con for the Pirate Cinema tour. Here's some highlights from yesterday's brief excursion on the floor:

An Occupy Ankh-Morpork protester at Terry Pratchett's signing for Dodger.

Star Trek: TOS bathrobes! (Speaking as a serious loungewear enthusiast, I have this to say: PHWOAR). Available from Amazon and ThinkGeek. Read the rest

Cory at NY Comic-Con today

Hey New Yorkers! I'll be at New York Comic-Con today, speaking in the Author Spotlight on the Unbound Stage at 12 o'clock, and then signing books at the Tor Booth (#920) at 3PM. On Monday night, I'll be at Brooklyn's WORD books at 7PM, before heading to Philly, Bethesda, Edmonton, Vancouver, Victoria, Seattle, Toronto and Boston! I hope you'll come out and say hi! Here's the whole schedule. Read the rest

Mitt and Rob

Comedian Rob Delaney's tweets to GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney, illustrated by @pants and archived together at "Mitt and Rob." Read the rest

A tribute by fellow comic artists to Matt Groening’s "Life in Hell"

In June 2012, "after 1,669 installments (and down to only 38 papers, amid the smoking wreckage that was once the alternative press), Matt Groening put an end to one the funniest and most caustic comic strips ever. To commemorate the dearly departed strip, 22  of Groening’s cartoonist friends, admirers, and sycophants decided to pay tribute." View the comics at Slate Magazine. Read the rest

New York Five: beautifully told coming-of-age comic from Brian Wood and Ryan Kelly

DC's Vertigo has published The New York Five, the sequel (and conclusion?) to the original Minx title. I've just finished it and it was worth the wait. The characters from the original story return seasoned by their first semester, wiser and more gunshy, but still filled with the wild, reckless energy that made them so engaging in the first volume.

Supergod: Warren Ellis's horrific arms-race endtimes

Warren Ellis and Garrie Gastonny's Supergod is a magnificently grim and horrifying superhero comic, in which a British government scientist narrates the sequence of events that killed the planet Earth, in whose rubble he sits. Supergod is the story of a secret arms-race, in which the major powers of the world all conspired to produce superhuman, godlike beings who were meant to act as their national saviors. Instead, each of these gods becomes a force of ineffable and unstoppable terror, killing and laying waste in unfathomable acts of horrific violence.

Sailor Twain: don't fall in love with the mermaid of the Hudson valley

I wrote about Sailor Twain, Mark Siegel's beautiful, haunting serialized graphic novel when it began. Since then, the story of a New York steamship captain who is haunted by his love for a mermaid has run its course, and today it has been published in a single, handsome hardcover volume from FirstSecond.

Sailor Twain tells the story of Captain Twain of the Lorelei, which plies its trade up and down the Hudson valley, while the ship's owner, a dissolute Frenchman, seduces the wives of the gentry in the owner's cabin. Captain Twain's own beloved wife is wasting with some unspecified disease on land, and he works to raise money to send her to specialists. He's a good man, beset with tragedy, and he has forgotten how to write the poetry he once loved.

And then comes the day when he spies a mermaid clinging to the deck of the Lorelei, gravely wounded. He pulls her from the sea and into his cabin, and everything changes for Sailor Twain. The poetry comes back, and at his request, she never sings for him, never puts him under her siren spell. But still, he is hers.

Out spills a mystery, a story about seduction and duty, mythology and gender, dreams lost and dreams forgotten, and the lure of magic and wonder. Siegel's illustrations are charcoal drawings that fearlessly mix highly detailed, realistic depictions with cartoons, impressionistic smears, and caricature, and they are moody and grey and dreamlike, the perfect match for the story. Read the rest

Jonathan Hickman: graphic novel stories, with infographics

I was intrigued by a recent Warren Ellis post about comics creator Jonathan Hickman. Ellis described Hickman's background in graphic design prior to his comics work, and mentioned that he'd done "the lion’s share of the most striking recent use of infographics in comics." The examples given by Ellis were intriguing.

I was in Toronto, and looking for an excuse to patronize the new location of the Silver Snail, Toronto's venerable comics institution, which has just moved from its historic digs on Queen Street West to a new spot on Yonge Street, after the owner sold the building and then retired, selling the business to store manager George Zotti. I've known George since he was a clerk at the Snail and I was a kid working at Bakka, the science fiction bookstore, which was once opposite the Snail's Queen Street location, and I wanted to go down and see the new shop and also support his plunge from manager to owner.

George sold me three Hickman collections, all from Image press: The Nightly News (2007), Pax Romana (2009), and Transhuman (2009). Ellis's point about the graphic design -- and especially the excellent use of infographics -- is well made in all three books. I don't think Read the rest

Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong: YA webcomic "full of teenagers building homemade robots in their basement"

Comics awesomecreator Faith Erin Hicks (Zombies Calling, Friends With Boys) is serializing a new comic online called "Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong," adapted from a Prudence Shen YA novel. When the serialization is done, the whole thing will be published between covers by the marvellous FirstSecond books. FirstSecond's Gina Gagliano describes it as "full of teenagers building homemade robots in their basement." Sounds like my kind of thing!

Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong (Thanks, Gina!) Read the rest

Archie comic from 1972 about 2012

Reportedly snipped from an Archie comic from 1972 in which he time travels to 2012. Even if the 1972/2012 bit is off, it's a great panel anyway. (via @coseyfannitutti) Read the rest

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