The unlikely actor who played Ridley Scott's Alien

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In Ridley Scott's classic 1979 science fiction/horror film Alien, the terrifying creature was played by a 6'10" Nigerian named Bolaiji Badejo. It was Badejo's only film credit. In fact Badejo, who died of sickle cell disease in 1992 at age 39, wasn't even an actor. He was studying graphic arts in London when casting agent Peter Ardram spotted him in a pub. From CNN:

"As soon as I walked in Ridley Scott knew he'd found the right person," Badejo said in a rare interview for the French film magazine, Cinefantastique, in 1979...

"I could barely see what was going on around me," Badejo recalled in 1979, "except when I was in a stationary position, while they were filming. Then there were a few holes I could look through... It was terribly hot... I could only have it on for about 15 or 20 minutes at a time. When I took it off, my head would be soaked."

Bolaji Badejo: The Nigerian giant who played 'Alien' (CNN)

Below, Badejo's surreal screen test that I've previously posted:

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Puberty is awkward, especially when you're a space alien

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Adolescence is a weird, weird time in anyone's life, when it's easy to feel alienated from your peers, your family, even your own body. In Tentacles Growing Everywhere, an interactive novella by Squinky, you get to watch the experience of puberty play out for three actual aliens as they write entries in what is essentially Livejournal.

Described as an "an incredibly queer mashup of Judy Blume, Babysitters Club, and pulpy sci-fi," you follow along as three childhood friends head off to new schools and blog about their problems with crushes, bullying, and of course, the awkwardness of their changing tentacled bodies.

Although most of the game involves simply watching the journal entries unfold, you occasionally get to make choices—and hear the anxious metacommentary of each character as they ponder whether they're oversharing and occasionally delete their thoughts instead of sharing them with their friends (and the world). It's an experience that should ring true for anyone who's ever struggled with how much of themselves they want to show to the internet, or even to their friends.

Tentacles Growing Everywhere originally came out in May, but it's now available at the convenient price of "pay whatever you want" for Windows, Mac and Linux. Read the rest

Ultra low-budget remake of Alien 3

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Scarier than the original, because it recalls memories of accidentally stapling your finger.

[via]

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Analog control panels in film

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Dylan Schenker, Rhett Jones and Loney Abrams present a collection of the best, from Alien and Blade Runner to eXisTenZ. Read the rest

WATCH: 3D Printed Alien Xenomorph costume

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James Bruton at XRobots uses 3D printing to create cool cosplay outfits of his own design. He's been working on an amazing Alien xenomorph and posting regular updates on his progress. Read the rest

RIP, H.R. Giger, 1940-2014

The famous Swiss surrealist leaves behind some of the twentieth century's most impressive and startling artwork. Here are our favorite biomechanical wonders.

Tiny alien skeleton suspected of being human

This tiny skeleton, just 6 inches long, was found a decade ago in Chile's Atacama Desert. Scientists now report that DNA and other test results prove that it is human. Fox Mulder believes otherwise. "Alien-Looking Skeleton Poses Medical Mystery" (Discovery, thanks Syd Garon!)

And here is more about this specimen's provenance and its unwitting participation in a new documentary about ETs visiting Earth, titled Sirius. Read the rest

Realistic Roswell space alien autopsy tableau

John Whalen says, "My brother, Dan, cooked up this little quasi-historical tableau for his wife, Rose, in San Francisco." Read the rest

Prometheus trailer reveals Alien prequel

The high-definition trailer for Ridley Scott's forthcoming science fiction movie, Prometheus, is bound to impress. [iTunes] Read the rest