Women who'd never seen their vulvas given a mirror and a modesty screen

Women who'd never seen their vulvas were offered a modesty screen and a hand mirror and given the chance to have a peek. They liked what they saw, and were sweetly affirmed by it. (via Dan Hon)

Apex Predator Red Shoes with teeth


Red Shoes is a welcome addition to Fantich & Young's Apex Predator sculptures (previously) in which shoe-soles are studded with false teeth in a wonderfully gross echo of hyperdontia (warning, a bit icky). This seems like the kind of thing you could do yourself with some Sugru and some old dentures. In fact, I may have to give it a go. (via Crazy Abalone)

Internal organs swimsuit

Black Milk, Australia's leading purveyor of anatomical womenswear, has released its Dem Guts Swimsuit, which features a glorious rendering of its wearer's internal organs.

Dem Guts Swimsuit - LIMITED (via Crazy Abalone)

Great 8-bit gamer tees


8-Bitty does some extremely great pixel-art tees inspired by classic video-games. I like the two-sided, full-shirt screens the best, like the mummy wrappings and the skeleton (this one reminds me of the classic Skeletees and makes me wish it was as detailed as Leslie Arwin's original).

8-Bitty (Thanks, Luke!)

Forensic reconstruction of a Crystal Head Vodka skull


Nigel, a Scottish forensic artist, did this facial reconstruction job on a bottle of Crystal Head Vodka, yielding up a glimpse of how the grotesque crystalline monsters whose skulls are harvested by the Crystal Vodka people might look.

Crystal Head Vodka Forensic Facial Reconstruction

Clothing adorned with silicone nipples, trimmed with human hair


Human Furriery is an art project/fashion line by Argentinian artist Nicola Peleteria, comprising clothes sporting 3D silicone nipples, whose "fur" trim was made of human hair. Also in the set was a pair of men's shoes sporting puckered anuses.

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Korean plastic surgeon removes towering jars of excised jawbones after fine

A Gangnam, Seoul plastic surgeon who did a roaring trade in excising womens' jawbones to give them V-shaped chins was forced to remove the towering jars of thousands of jawbone fragments with which he decorated his office. Photos of the jars spread online, resulting in a visit from a local official, who fined the surgeon about $3000 and ordered the display removed.

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Odd, bilious guts (and porny donuts)


Scott Teplin posted Bile to the Boing Boing Flickr Group, along with a link to his wonderful series of watercolors called Future Trash, full of wolvertonian, anatomical oddments. This is my kind of grotesque! He also has a nice line of porny donuts [NSFD].

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Futuristic armor for organs


Viaframe's renders of armor for your organs are sure pretty. I think they'd be a little terminal for everyday use, but they'd make great canopic storage for the old burial chamber-oonie.

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Skull chair with brain ottoman


Vladi Rapaport's Skull Chair isn't the first one we've posted (cf: stacking chair; armchair), but it's my favorite so far. Love the subtlety of the skull, the eamesoid styling. Works especially well accompanied by the brain ottoman, made from leather and foam.

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But what the spleen do?

A very important "What the Fox Say?" parody by students from the 2016 class of Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

And, for the record, the spleen is involved in filtering blood and recycling red blood cells and also serves as a storage reserve of white blood cells. Now you know.

Adopt a skull to help the Mutter Museum

The Mutter Museum — a freaky fantastic collection of medical curiosities — is trying to restore and preserve a collection of 139 skulls that were once used to debunk the pseudoscience of phrenology. You can help by adopting a skull for $200.

Your brain is all squishy: An anatomical demonstration

This video was made by the University of Utah Brain Institute to teach medical students about what a brain looks and feels like before it gets preserved in formalin and takes on the texture of a hard rubber ball.

The big takeaway message: Your brain is seriously squishy. So squishy, in fact, that a finger can dent it. As professor Suzanne Stensaas explains, this is one of the reasons why cerebrospinal fluid is so important. Your brain has to float in that fluid. If it didn't, it would come to rest against the side of your hard skull and quickly end up deformed.

Seriously, this is a fascinating (if extremely graphic) video. (Hilariously, given that fact, it opens with an image of a student eating.) Definitely worth watching!

Beautifully detailed artificial cadaver: like a 3D jigsaw puzzle that pumps heated blood


A mere $40K gets you Syndaver's full-body practice cadaver, a beautifully detailed surgical simulator, with "skin with fat and fascia planes, every bone, muscle, tendon, and ligament in the body, fully articulating joints, a functioning respiratory system including trachea, lungs, and diaphragm, a complete digestive tract from the esophagus to rectum, the urinary tract (kidneys, bladder, and urethra), visceral organs (liver, gall bladder, pancreas, spleen), reproductive organs, a circulatory system with heart and coronary arteries, aorta, vena cava, and the primary arterial and venous trunks leading to the extremities."

They call it "pinnacle of hands-on surgical simulation" and "a 3D jigsaw puzzle" -- and who am I to argue. If $40K is too rich for your synthetic blood, they also do organs, wearable simulators for training roleplay, synthetic tissues, and a whole range of delightful wobbly bits.

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The Fabric of the Human Body: Spectacular edition of foundational 16th C anatomy text, 20 years in the making


David Hast sez, "Karger Publishing has released an important new translation of a foundational book in the history of science, the 16th century 'De Humani Corporis Fabrica Libri Septem' by Andreas Vesalius. Vesalius was the first modern anatomist, relying for the first time in history on dissections of human cadavers. His anatomy is a foundation of modern medicine and of the understanding of the human body."

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