Boing Boing 

Pixar's chief creative officer Jon Lasseter on the evolution of storytelling

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"At that time when we rendered things, everything kind of looked plastic-y," Lasseter says. "Everything looks like plastic, so what if the characters were made of plastic? What if they were... toys?'"

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Animated interview with Ayn Rand

"I have no faith at all. I only hold convictions." Audio from interview conducted by Mike Wallace in 1959. (Blank on Blank)

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Watch: Five Stages of Watching a Pixar Movie

"Who knew feelings had feelings too."

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Historic photographs transformed into surreal animated GIFs by Nicolas Monterrat

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The GIF works of Nicolas Monterrat, who uses vintage photographs as a base for his unsettling, trippy, subtle little animations.

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Powerpuff Girls return, but original voice cast is peeved they were left behind

They Powerpuff Girls are coming back to Cartoon Network in 2016. As you can see above, they look about the same as before. The outlines are thinner, but they still have mouths that can be mistaken for noses (my daughter wasn't pleased to have that pointed out to her, because it's hard to unsee.)

One big change will be the voices of the Powerpuff Girls. The original voices for Blossom, Bubbles and Buttercup were provided by Catherine Cavadini, Tara Strong, and Elizabeth Daily. They went on Twitter yesterday to express their disappointment at not even being told about the reboot until the press release was issued. From Tara Strong, the voice of Bubbles:

Show creator Craig McCracken sympathized with the actors:

On the other hand, the new voices of Powerpuff Girls are super excited!

I have to admit, I like the sound of the new actors' voices already!

Watch: Fly over the dwarf planet Ceres in this new NASA video

Here's a newly-released video animation of dwarf planet Ceres, based on images taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft, that provides “dramatic flyover views of this heavily cratered, mysterious world.”

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Alex Toth - the cranky genius cartoonist who designed Johnny Quest and Space Ghost

The three Genius Illustrated books dedicated to the life and works of Alex Toth make up what’s likely the most lavish and complete portrait ever of an American comic book artist or animator: Toth was both. In the worlds of both comics and cartoons, Toth was viewed as an artist’s artist. His figure work, use of light and shade, and especially his sense of character and page design were universally admired by his peers.

He was also a real pill.For every story about Toth’s genius, there are those about his cranky moods and prima donna behavior. He regularly walked out on jobs or was fired because his vision conflicted with that of editors and other supervisors, who Toth nearly always viewed as his inferiors. If he didn’t like a comic book script, Toth would simply change or re-write it as he saw fit. As a result, his work for publishers such as DC and Marvel Comics was sporadic and limited. He hated superheroes, anyway. He had a memorable run at the Standard Comics, producing romance comics and tales of adventure and suspense.

Toth loved the movies, especially old, swashbuckling ones starring the likes of Errol Flynn. His Zorro comic for Dell is a classic with its use of shape and shadow, the main character swooping through the night with his cape swirling and sword gleaming. He could also draw airplanes and aerial battles like nobody’s business. But Toth found his most steady and productive work in Hollywood, principally for Hanna-Barbera, where he storyboarded cartoons for TV and designed characters. The looks of Johnny Quest, Space Ghost, the Herculoids and the Super Friends all flowed from his pen.

Hundreds of examples of Toth’s work, ranging from sketches and comic book stories to character design sheets and storyboards, fill the pages of all three of these books. The first two volumes make up Toth’s biography. All the terrible tales are recounted, but the overall picture of Toth is sympathetic. His children and friends are interviewed. We gain a better understanding of his challenges and depressions and witness the periods when, thankfully, he found some peace and happiness in the world. The final book is nearly all art, focusing on Toth’s animation career. Toth’s great talent and brilliance is present on every page of all three. – John Firehammer

Taylor Swift video rotoscoped into complete insanity by 49 animation students

Each were given 52 frames of Shake it Off, and the result is "2767 frames of lovingly hand-drawn rotoscoped footage." Come for the tentacles, stay for the surrealist dragon kin.

Redrawing Taylor Swift - Shake it Off Rotoscoped

Shredder is lonely

Behind the mask, why does no-one ask, how Shredder feels? [via Laughing Squid]

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Nine trippy animators interpret Dan Deacon's "When I Was Done Dying"

Dan's new video features a range of psychedelic styles. Off The Air has interviews with Dan and the artists:

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A Book of Mojo, on Indiegogo

The Book of Mojo is a webcomic whose creators hope will become an animated series or feature. The main character, Creepy, is an African-American girl with magic powers; and her unlikely partner, Mojo, is a 7-foot tall man of stone with no memory.

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Dull man inherits magical workshop in 'What Lives Inside,' his mind is blown

Dell—-yes, the computer company--is making a TV series. Director Robert Stromberg's (Maleficent) fantasy is What Lives Inside and stars Colin Hanks (who eerily recalls his famous father the more he grows), an Oscar-fresh J.K. Simmons, and the beloved Catherine O'Hara.

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Pixar's Renderman released for free

Pixar has released its Renderman imaging software to the public free to download. This version is identical to the software it uses on it's own films, which was invented in-house, and is used today by major film and video game studios for animation and visual effects. This free license is for non-commercial use only, which includes show reels and student films.

Free Non-Commercial RenderMan can be used for research, education, evaluation, plug-in development, and any personal projects that do not generate commercial profits. Free Non-Commercial RenderMan is also fully featured, without watermark, time limits, or other user limitations.

Pixar is also launching a Renderman Community Site to share knowledge and assets, showcase work, and support all the new users bound to take advantage of this unique opportunity.

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Choosing skin color in comics

Lighten Up

Ronald Wimberly is a comics and animation artist, the author of Vertigo's Prince of Cats, and a character designer for Black Dynamite: The Animated Series. Wembly has illustrated a work experience he had while coloring an X-Men comic. His story, Lighten Up, appears on the excellent blog The Nib, a site devoted to "political cartoons, comics journalism, humor and non-fiction."

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Stare at the letters of the GIF alphabet. Forever.

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Graphic designer, Florian Schommer, created a bunch of animated letters of the alphabet! If only I could read German, so I could know more about what he was thinking.

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Adventure Time Docs


These Adventure Time Docs sell for $130-$150. (via Super Punch)

Videoshopping still photos of Putin creates an uncanny valley effect

Bennie Melwin shares this clip of how they videoshopped photos of Vladimir Putin for the making of a hilarious commentary on Putin's anti-gay policies.

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