Boing Boing 

Self-aiming sniper rifle can be pwned over the Internet


The $13,000 Trackingpoint sniper rifle is vulnerable to wifi-based attacks that allow your adversary to redirect bullets to new targets of their choosing.

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Chrysler has to recall its cars due to security vulnerabilities


Chrysler, whose Jeep Cherokees were demonstrated to be vulnerable to Internet-based attacks on their steering and brakes (as well as radios, air conditioning and other systems) has recalled 1.4M cars due to software vulnerabilities.

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UK schools' "anti-radicalisation" software lets hackers spy on kids


The spyware that Impero supplies to UK schools -- which searches kids' Internet use for "jihadi" terms -- uses "password" as its default password, and the company has threatened brutal legal reprisals against the researcher who repeatedly demonstrated their total security negligence.

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The next Librarian of Congress: a Librarian of Progress?


For the first time in 28 years, the Library of Congress is about to get a new Librarian, a person with enormous influence over the Internet and American life.

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Outstanding paper on the impact of ebook DRM on readers, writers, publishers and distributors

In last summer's Unlocking the Gates of Alexandria: DRM, Competition and Access to E-Books , Ana Carolina Bittar of the Fundação Getulio Vargas Law School at São Paulo does an outstanding, thorough, and easily understandable job in explaining the ways in which ebook DRM ends up hurting writers, readers and publishers by shifting market power to the ebook vendors like Amazon, Google Play, Apple and B&N.

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GCHQ hacking squad worried about getting sued for copyright violation


The British spy-agency targeted anti-virus software and other common applications in reverse-engineering projects aimed at discovering and weaponizing defects in the code.

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Every 3 years you get to beg the government for the right to treat your property as if you owned it


Section 1201 of the 1998 Digital Millennium Copyright Act bans jailbreaking devices, even for lawful purposes -- meaning that you can't jailbreak your tractor in order to take it to the service-center of your choosing or fix it yourself.

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If you want a picture of the future, imagine a Roomba leaking pix of your home, forever

The game-plan for future Roombas may fit them with cameras that send images of your home to a remote service that identifies obstacles and lets the little robots clean around them -- what could possibly go wrong?

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GM says you don't own your car, you just license it


GM has joined with John Deere in asking the government to confirm that you literally cannot own your car because of the software in its engine.

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John Deere: of course you "own" your tractor, but only if you agree to let us rip you off


John Deere freaked out over a a petition to the Copyright Office to let tractor owners break the DRM on their vehicles in order to diagnose and fix them.

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Keurig CEO blames disastrous financials on DRM

Keurig CEO Brian Kelley blamed a 23% drop in sales on his decision to use DRM to stop people from buying their coffee-pods from his competition.

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Drug pump is "most insecure" devices ever seen by researcher

Security researcher Jeremy Richards has called the Hospira Lifecare PCA 3 drug-pump "the least secure IP enabled device" he's examined.

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Legal threat against security researcher claims he violated lock's copyright


Mike Davis from Ioactive found serious flaws in the high-security the Cyberlock locks used by hospitals, airports and critical infrastructure, but when he announced his findings, he got a legal threat that cited the Digital Millennium Copyright Act.

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Tell the Copyright Office not to criminalize using unapproved goop in a 3D printer

3D printing giant Stratasys has asked the US Copyright Office to deny a proposal that would legalize jailbreaking your 3D printer in order to use your own feedstock.

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In the 21st century, only corporations get to own property and we're their tenants


In the wake of John Deere's claims that the software in its engines means that its farm equipment is "licensed," not "sold," I talked to the Globe and Mail about what digital locks mean for the idea of property in the 21st century.

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Apollo 11's Michael Collins on the view from space

From a classic FAQ by Michael Collins, command module pilot for Apollo 11, which splashed down 45 years ago today after carrying the first human beings to the moon:

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Inside NASA's rubber room

If a Saturn V rocket had ever exploded on the launchpad, it would have been a catastrophic event. NASA engineers once calculated that the resulting fireball would have been 1048 feet wide and would have hit temperatures as high as 2,500 degrees Fahrenheit. In the hopes of not losing astronauts or launch crew to the inferno, NASA tricked out the Apollo launchpad with some safety systems that still exist today, including an underground, rubber-lined bunker that was accessible from the launch platform via a 200-foot twisty slide. (Which almost sounds like fun, until you consider the context.)

Amy Shira Teitel is one of the few people who have been inside the rubber room recently. In the video above, and she shares photos and stories about it in the video above, at her blog, and on Discovery.com.

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