Boing Boing 

An elegant computer for a more civilized age

Apple ///

Somewhere, nestled in the woods near Santa Rosa, California, Ryan Powers came across this relic from a time better left forgotten.

This Apple /// serves as a dark reminder of the days when computer science pioneers were outcasts, and forced to hide in the wild, with little more than a 6502 assembler to keep them warm.

Watch the trailer for new Steve Jobs documentary

"His stuff was beloved, but it wasn't that he was beloved."

Read the rest

With stolen iPhone, burglar accidentally posts selfie video online

628x471

Los Angeles police are searching for the identity of this burglar, who accidentally shot and published a selfie with his victim's iPhone.

Read the rest

Apple's iOS ad-blocking is a net, not a gun

adblock_tshirtJoel Johnson, freshly out of Gawker's top editorial role, reports on what Apple may achieve by facilitating ad- and content-blocking in the next version of iOS: leverage over publishers.

Read the rest

Apple 1987 predictions of what 1997 would be like

appleThey got everything right! [via, via]

Watch this '80s vision of future tech from Apple, and be glad for what didn't come true

This 1987 video from Apple imagines a future world in 1997 made richer and more wonderful by all the sweet Apple products Apple was going to build.

Read the rest

Watch the first trailer for new Steve Jobs biopic

That's Michael Fassbender as Jobs and Seth Rogen as Woz. Directed by Michael Boyle and written by Aaron Sorkin based on Walter Isaacson's book. Due out October 9.

Read the rest

How to make a working quadcopter out of the Apple Watch packaging box

“I Watch You,” a most nifty hack by Eirik Solheim.

Read the rest

Monster Cable founder sad about getting $0 from Apple's $3 billion purchase of Beats By Dr. Dre

famous-monsters

Noel Lee says he invented the headphones that are marketed by Beats by Dr. Dre. In May 2014, Apple paid $3 billion to buy Beats by Dr. Dre.

Dr. Dre and music producer Jimmy Iovine got most of the proceeds of the sale and Lee got $0. Now Lee is suing for at least $150 million. Lee is the founder of Monster Cable, a company with an obnoxious reputation for threatening to sue any company that uses the word "Monster." I can't help feeling a bit of schadenfreude towards Lee, who has made many people miserable by hitting them with time- and money-wasting legal threats.

Should Apple can the Mac?

macpro_5-100221179-orig-100591111-largeThe Wall Street Journal's Christopher Mims wants the Mac put to death: "Ditching its most-refined brand will allow Apple to focus on products that represent the future."

Read the rest

Apple introduces new font: “San Francisco.” Shoulda been called “Francisco Sans.“

Apple.com


Apple.com

Apple today made available its new San Francisco system font, offered for developers who are working on next-generation apps for iOS 9, OS X El Capitan and watchOS 2.

Read the rest

If the FBI has a backdoor to Facebook or Apple encryption, we are less safe

Reuters


Reuters

Freedom of the Press Foundation director Trevor Timm tells Boing Boing,

Now that the USA Freedom Act is out of the way, it seems pretty clear the next battle in Congress will almost certainly be over encryption, as the FBI has not stopped its push to force tech companies to insert a backdoor into their communications tools, despite being ridiculed for it by security experts. The FBI seems to push it even farther in the past week, testifying before Congress that they need to stop encryption "above all else" and leaking a story to the LA Times about ISIS using encrypted text messaging apps. I wrote about what a dumb move it is on several levels for the Guardian.

Read the rest

Why we can't remember ubiquitous logos, even Apple's

F1506B_CASTEL_NOTQUITE

UCLA psychology professor Alan Castel ran an experiment where more than 100 students drew the Apple logo from memory, and the results were surprisingly terrible. Why?

Read the rest

Apple announces Apple Music and native Watch apps

Its own News app and updates to OS X and iOS filled an unusually-packed lineup of new softwareRead the rest

The inside story of how the iPhone crippled BlackBerry

The Wall Street Journal has a juicy excerpt from Jacquie McNish and Sean Silcoff's new book, Losing the Signal: The Untold Story Behind the Extraordinary Rise and Spectacular Fall of BlackBerry.

The next day Mr. Lazaridis grabbed his co-CEO Jim Balsillie at the office and pulled him in front of a computer.

"Jim, I want you to watch this," he said, pointing to a webcast of the iPhone unveiling. "They put a full Web browser on that thing. The carriers aren't letting us put a full browser on our products."

Mr. Balsillie's first thought was RIM was losing AT&T as a customer. "Apple's got a better deal," Mr. Balsillie said. "We were never allowed that. The U.S. market is going to be tougher."

"These guys are really, really good," Mr. Lazaridis replied. "This is different."

"It's OK -- we'll be fine," Mr. Balsillie responded.

RIM's chiefs didn't give much additional thought to Apple's iPhone for months. "It wasn't a threat to RIM's core business," says Mr. Lazaridis's top lieutenant, Larry Conlee. "It wasn't secure. It had rapid battery drain and a lousy [digital] keyboard."

[via]

Finally, Apple Watch available in stores this month

The Apple Watch, Sport Edition.


The Apple Watch, Sport Edition.

After over a month of pre-sales and online-only availability, the Apple Watch will finally be on the shelves in Apple stores later this month. Consumers will be able to touch and try on the watch and then actually take it home the same day. Not that selling exclusively online has hurt the product: Apple has had an estimated  7-million Apple Watch orders since its launch and expects to deliver 5-million watches by the end of the first quarter, which is double what analysts had expected.  And Apple has by far outsold what the iPod, iPhone and iPad took in during their first quarter. Yet another win for Apple!

Apple must keep corporate monitor, says judge

Reuters

Apple has failed in a bid to rid itself of a court-appointed monitor, imposed on the tech company after it was accused of conspiring to raise the price of e-books.

Michael Bromwich's $1000-an-hour job is to ensure Cupertino is compliant with the outcome of the price-fixing case—an imposition that Apple claims is excessively burdensome, given that it must cut his checks. But the federal appeals court ruled that the environment must be "appropriately constrained" and that Bromwich can't be disqualified.

Michael Bromwich, a former Justice Department inspector general, began assessing Apple’s antitrust compliance policies six days after he was appointed in October 2013 by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote, who held the company liable

The case was a bitter one, given that the alleged price-fixing represented efforts by publishers and Apple, a newcomer to the market, to compete with Amazon's overwhelming domination of the ebook marketplace. Mat Honan summed it up like so:

But there were no heroes, and plenty of history coming home to roost for those involved.

Apple objects not only to the cost, but the scope of Bromwich's work. Bromwich says it's just playing games because it can't take its medicine.

According to Bromwich, Apple was pulling a shakedown. He’d filed a report on the company with the court, as had been required, and said Apple was furious with the results. The company, he argued, had been refusing to pay him as punishment.

"The monitoring team still lacks a significant amount of the information it needs to fulfill its monitoring obligations," Bromwich wrote in the report. "For these reasons, and others described in this report, the Monitor’s assessment of Apple’s antitrust compliance policies, procedures, and training remains preliminary."

"We're here in large part not because Apple objects to the fact that we wrote the report," Bromwich said. "We're commanded specifically to write that report and subsequent reports by the final judgment. They're objecting to our discretionary decisions about what to put in the report. There can be nothing more chilling to someone in my position to have the contents of a report challenged and for payment to be declined because the monitored entity isn't happy with what's in the report."