Libraries can't afford to ignore Itunes' awful licensing terms

Jessamyn writes, "Itunes-only music is licensed for personal use. This does not include libraries' ability to offer it for lending. Kevin Smith, Duke University's Scholarly Communications Officer, outlines the real problems libraries encounter when trying to obtain legal access to digital-only files that have restrictive licensing."

Read the rest

Back doors in Apple's mobile platform for law enforcement, bosses, spies (possibly)

Jonathan Zdziarski's HOPE X talk, Identifying Backdoors, Attack Points, and Surveillance Mechanisms in iOS Devices, suggests that hundreds of millions of Iphone and Ipad devices ship from Apple with intentional back-doors that can be exploited by law enforcement, identity thieves, spies, and employers.

Read the rest

Where does the Apple 'command' icon come from? Would you believe... a Swedish castle?

55-61845-borgholm-castle-in-sweden-1402436190

At Tested, exploring the origins of a keyboard symbol familiar to Apple computer users. Turns out it traces back to Borgholm castle in Sweden. In Sweden, the shape of the castle became a symbol used in street signs to indicate a point of interest or attraction. [via Buffer]

Apple adds privacy-protecting MAC spoofing (when Aaron Swartz did it, it was evidence of criminality)

Apple has announced that it will spoof the MAC addresses emitted by its wireless devices as an anti-tracking measure, a change that, while welcome, is "an umbrella in a hurricane" according to a good technical explainer by the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Jeremy Gillula and Seth Schoen.

Read the rest

In-car iOS and Android partners line up

CarPlay is the new name of Apple's in-car cut of iOS, and the launch partners will be Mercedes, Volvo and Ferrari. Google's rival system, announced at CES, is to launch in vehicles by Honda, Audi, Hyundai and GM. Your personal futuriness can now be measured by whether your choice of phone influences your brand of car, or vice-versa. [Guardian]

Tim Cook to climate deniers: get bent

The National Center for Public Policy Research, group of climate deniers with stock in Apple, tried to force a motion to terminate Apple's use of renewable energy (and failed miserably). At the company's AGM, an NCPPR spokesdenier asked Apple CEO Tim Cook to defend the profit-maximization nature of green energy. Cook told him -- more or less -- to go fuck himself: "If you want me to do things only for ROI reasons, you should get out of this stock." Cory 28

Apple appeals against e-book verdict

Deepto Hajela with the AP: "Apple filed papers on Tuesday telling a federal appeals court in New York that a judge's finding it violated antitrust laws by manipulating electronic book prices 'is a radical departure' from modern antitrust law that will 'chill competition and harm consumers' if allowed to stand."

Crowfunded prize for first open jailbreak of Ios 7


Elizabeth Stark writes, "We're pleased to announce the Device Freedom Prize: a crowdfunded reward for the first developer(s) who release an open source iOS 7 jailbreak. Providing users the ability to control their devices is crucial in an age where we're increasingly dependent on our mobile phones. An open source jailbreak provides users the capability to install what they want on their own devices, the ability to audit the code they're using to do so, and enables disabled users to more easily use their devices."

"We've assembled a judging panel of awesome folks that care a lot about these issues, including Boing Boing's own Cory Doctorow; Kyle Wiens, CEO of iFixit; Biella Coleman, Professor and Author of Coding Freedom, and Chris Maury, Accessibility Advocate. Contribute to the prize to help make an open source iOS jailbreak a reality."

Is iOS7 jailbroken yet? (Thanks, Elizabeth!)

Incredibly Interesting Authors 002: Jony Ive biographer Leander Kahney

Subscribe to Incredibly Interesting Authors

Leander Kahney has covered Apple for more than a dozen years and has written three popular books about Apple, including Inside Steve’s Brain and The Cult of Mac. His newest book is a biography of Apple's senior VP of design, called Jony Ive: The Genius behind Apple's Greatest Products.

Millions are familiar with Apple's legendary aesthetic. It's what makes their products instantly recognizable, and is synonymous with craft, care, and quality.

And though the design is iconic, few are familiar with the man behind the design: Jonathan Ive, chief designer. Not only has Ive made Apple one of the most valuable companies in the world -- his design has overturned entire industries, from music and mobile phones to PCs and tablets.

Unlike his former boss and creative partner Steve Jobs, Ive shuns the spotlight. Naturally shy and soft-spoken, he lets his work speak for itself. In Jony Ive: The Genius behind Apple's Greatest Products, Kahney offers a gripping and thorough examination of a remarkably creative career and provides insight into the principles underlying Ive's success.

Here's my interview with Leander in the second episode of my new podcast, Incredibly Interesting Authors.

Incredibly Interesting Authors: RSS | iTunes | Download this episode

Apple hides a Patriot-Act-busting "warrant canary" in its transparency report


"A green budgie sitting on a human finger." Thomas Skjaeveland/Shutterstock.

The Patriot Act provides for secret warrants to spy on ISPs' customers. These "Section 215" warrants come with gag orders that mean that the company can't disclose their existence. This lack of transparency is ripe for abuse and is bad for ISPs' business. Apple is fighting back with a "warrant canary": they've published a transparency report (PDF) that states "Apple has never received an order under Section 215 of the USA Patriot Act. We would expect to challenge an order if served on us." If they are served with a 215 order in future, their next transparency report will drop this language, omitting any mention of 215, and keen-eyed watchers will know that they've been subjected to a secret order. I proposed a more ambitious version of this in September, though I was hardly the first person to suggest it. Good for Apple for using it.

Rebutting Apple's claim of Imessage security: Apple can too spy on users

Ios jailbreaker and security researcher Cyril Cattiaux presented his work on Apple's Imessage software at the Hack in the Box conference in Kuala Lumpur. Apple had previously stated that its messaging software was resistant to Prism-style surveillance because of its secure key-handling, through which the company itself could not see what its users were saying. Cattiaux called this "basically lies" and showed that there was scope for undetectably swapping out keys, allowing the company (or anyone it cooperates with) to spy on users. Cattiaux worked with other researchers, including Moxie Marlinspike, and showed that there were ways of designing Imessage such that users could detect key-substitutions and other attacks on the integrity of their messages, but that Apple had chosen to implement their system in a less secure way.

Read the rest

Iphone fingerprint hacker on the limits of biometrics for security

Jan "Starbug" Krissler, the Chaos Computer Club researcher who broke the fingerprint reader security on the new Iphone, had given a long interview to Zeit Online explaining his process and his thoughts on biometrics in general. The CCC's Alex Antener was good enough to translate the interview for us; I've included some of the most interesting bits after the jump.

Read the rest

More details, new video showing Iphone fingerprint reader pwned by Chaos Computer Club


Starbug, the Chaos Computer Club hacker who broke the fingerprint biometric security on the Iphone, has given an interview [German] to CT Magazine detailing the hack, and released a new video showing how he did it.

Read the rest

Chaos Computer Club claims it can unlock Iphones with fake fingers/cloned fingerprints

The Chaos Computer Club's biometric hacking team has announced a successful attack on Apple's Iphone biometric fingerprint lock, using a variation on the traditional fingerprint-cloning technique. CCC's Starbug summarizes: "As we have said now for more than years, fingerprints should not be used to secure anything. You leave them everywhere, and it is far too easy to make fake fingers out of lifted prints."

Read the rest

iPhone 5s reviews in

Apple's iPhone 5S has a better camera, faster hardware and a gold-trimmed option. How does it stack up to last year's model, and strong offerings from Samsung and Nokia?

Read the rest