If the FBI can force decryption backdoors, why not backdoors to turn on your phone's camera?


Eddy Cue, Apple's head of services, has warned that if the FBI wins its case and can force Apple to produce custom software to help break into locked phones, there's nothing in principle that would stop it from seeking similar orders for custom firmware to remotely spy on users through their phones' cameras and microphones. Read the rest

Using distributed code-signatures to make it much harder to order secret backdoors


Cothority is a new software project that uses "multi-party cryptographic signatures" to make it infinitely harder for governments to order companies to ship secret, targeted backdoors to their products as innocuous-looking software updates. Read the rest

Racial justice organizers to FBI vs Apple judge: crypto matters to #blacklivesmatter


Phenomena like the Harlem Cryptoparty demonstrate the connection between racial justice and cryptography -- civil rights organizers remember that the FBI spied on and blackmailed Martin Luther King, sending him vile notes encouraging him to kill himself. Read the rest

Why the First Amendment means that the FBI can't force Apple to write and sign code


Code is speech: critical court rulings from the early history of the Electronic Frontier Foundation held that code was a form of expressive speech, protected by the First Amendment. Read the rest

Apple vs FBI: The privacy disaster is inevitable, but we can prevent the catastrophe


My new Guardian column, Forget Apple's fight with the FBI – our privacy catastrophe has only just begun, explains how surveillance advocates have changed their arguments: 20 years ago, they argued that the lack of commercial success for privacy tools showed that the public didn't mind surveillance; today, they dismiss Apple's use of cryptographic tools as a "marketing stunt" and treat the proportionality of surveillance as a settled question. Read the rest

ISIS opsec: jihadi tech bureau recommends non-US crypto tools


The US government is attempting to force Apple to backdoor its Iphone security, congress is considering mandatory backdoors for all secure technology, and FBI director James Comey insists that this will work, because there's no way that America's enemies might just switch over to using technology produced in other countries without such mandates. Read the rest

Apple v FBI isn't about security vs privacy; it's about America's security vs FBI surveillance


Dan Kaminsky, one of the Internet's essential squad of "volunteer fire fighters" who oversaw the largest-ever synchronized vulnerability patching in Internet history, has written a stirring editorial for Wired explaining what the FBI puts at risk when it demands weaker encryption: it's not our privacy, it's the security of finance, health care, roads, and every other piece of tech-enabled infrastructure in the land. Read the rest

#FBIvsApple could lead to "virtually limitless" surveillance powers, warns judge in iPhone case


What's at stake in the fight between the FBI and Apple over those iPhones? Oh, no big deal, just the legal green light for “virtually limitless” surveillance under the Internet of Things. That's what a federal judge has ruled in an order rejecting a government request in a New York drug case.

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Federal judge rules US government can't force Apple to make a security-breaking tool


We've all heard that there's a federal judge in California who ordered Apple to make a tool to help the FBI decrypt a phone belonging to one of the San Bernardino shooters -- but despite the FBI's insistence that this is a special circumstance, San Bernardino is just one of a dozen-odd cases where the FBI is making similar demands on Apple. Read the rest

FBI claims it has no records of its decision to delete its recommendation to encrypt your phone


Two years ago, the FBI published its official advice to "protect your mobile device," including a recommendation to encrypt your storage. This year, the FBI is suing Apple to force it to break its encryption. Read the rest

_applyChinaLocationShift: In China, national security means that all the maps are wrong


Chinese law makes independent mapmaking a crime (you may not document "the shapes, sizes, space positions, attributes, etc. of man-made surface installations") and requires tech companies to randomly vary the locations of all landmarks by 100-500m. Read the rest

Bill Gates: Microsoft would backdoor its products in a heartbeat


Bill Gates has joined Donald Trump in condemning Apple for refusing to backdoor its products at the behest of the FBI, promising that the company that he founded, a waning firm called Microsoft, would happily compromise its security on demand for the US government. Read the rest

To improve national security, improve crypto usability


Scout Sinclair Brody (previously) is executive director of Simply Secure, a nonprofit I volunteer for that works on impriving the usability of privacy tools so that normal people can understand and benefit from them. Read the rest

Wanting it badly isn't enough: backdoors and weakened crypto threaten the net

As you know, Apple just said no to the FBI's request for a backdoor in the iPhone, bringing more public attention to the already hot discussion on encryption, civil liberties, and whether “those in authority” should have the ability to see private content and communications -- what's referred to as “exceptional access.”[1]

What a serious keysigning ceremony looks like

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In his excellent technical explainer about the Iphone decryption order, the Electronic Frontier Foundation's Joseph Bonneau discusses the actual process of cryptographically signing a new release of a major piece of Internet infrastructure like IOS. Read the rest

Feds say Apple's pro-privacy response to iPhone hacking order is a 'marketing stunt'

Apple CEO Tim Cook

Apple said no to the government, and the government is pissed.

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The government was pushing Apple to break iPhone security long before San Bernardino attack

iPhone parts in a NY repair store, February 17, 2016.  REUTERS

They're not comin' for your guns, America. They're comin' for your phones.

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