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The colorful 3D art of El Grand Chamaco

El Grand Chamaco is an artist from Los Ramones, Mexico.

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WATCH: time-lapse origami turns a dollar bill into a koi fish

YouTuber TheOrigamiVoyueur filmed himself as he transformed a dollar bill into a koi, based on a instructions by expert Won Park.

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eBoy is making a San Francisco Pixel Poster

Our pixel pushing friends at eBoy are making one of their famous city Pixel Posters for San Francisco. It's long overdue! They are funding it via Kickstarter. (Above: eBoy's Tokyo Pixorama from 2007)

Yuri Shwedoff's captivating postapocalyptic fantasyscapes

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Artist Yuri Shwedoff from the Russian Federation creates disturbingly beautiful postapocalyptic illustrations with familiar elements.

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Overspray – a book about the airbrush art that defined the druggy seventies

If you’re familiar with LP album sleeves and National Lampoon covers of the 1970s, Overspray will be your time machine to that era. If you are not familiar with them, you will be overwhelmed by these glistening, transrealistic, drugged-out, sexualized images, which incorporate elements from 1900s Art Nouveau, 1920s Art Deco, 1940s cheesecake, and 1960s psychedelia.

Overspray focuses on the top four airbrush artists of the time — Charles E. White III, Peter Palombi, Dave Willardson, and Peter Lloyd, and includes interviews and many examples of their painstakingly-produced work. No artist today can do what these guys did with stencils, liquid paint, and an air compressor.

The book jacket has two covers on one side, and two on the other. You have your choice of which cover to use on the front.

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

A suitcase exhibit of pill bottles collected from the rich & famous

Bill Harris has collected 50 prescription medicine bottles from famous people (he either asked the celebrities to donate them to him or he bought them from other collectors). He made a cool display case to hold 42 of the bottles. Donors include Rod Stewart, Doris Day, Barbra Streisand, John Stamos, Cher, Kirk Douglas, Phyllis Diller, James Stewart, and Marlon Brando.

Los Angeles Magazine has the story, with comments from Harris on some of the bottles and their former owners.

FRANK SINATRA

FRANK SINATRA

Hydrocodone
(for Vicodin)
(1996)

“This one, from a Malibu pharmacy, proves that even when you have Frank Sinatra’s money, you still buy generic.”

Honest posters for 2015 Oscar nominees

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The good folks over at The Shiznit "decided to make new posters for the nominees that tell you what you can really expect." Above: Grand Budapest Hotel. Below: American Sniper.

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WATCH: HOWTO create this mind-bending worldscape

the-verge-lightfarm-studios Lightfarm Studios documented the making of "The Verge," this stunning worldscape based on work by Raqsonu Duhu. Lightfarm Brasil has the scoop:

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WATCH: Glassmaster Paul Stankard on glassblowing artistry

Paul Stankard's impossibly beautiful handblown glass pieces look impossible to create. In Beauty Beyond Nature, he discusses the craft while working in his studio.

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A work of art that reproduces 100 woodblock prints of Edo by artist Hiroshige

Without question, Hiroshige: One Hundred Famous Views of Edo is the bookiest book I own. It is a museum-quality artifact, which in a few more years will cease to be made, or at least made affordably. It is a work of art that reproduces the famous 100 Japanese woodblock prints that the artist Hiroshige created of Edo.

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Drawings made from sunlight and magnifying glass

1-Jordan-Mang-osan-600x337 Remember as a kid using a magnifying glass and the sun to kill ants? Filipino artist Jordan Mang-osan employs the same technique to create beautiful "solar drawings."

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Dreamscapes of marching military eggs, animated skeletons, anthropomorphic insects and other phantasmic scenes

Mike Davis, owner of the well-known Everlasting Tattoo shop in San Francisco, is also a surrealist artist whose rich and dreamlike oil paintings look as if they’ve been plucked right out of the Dutch Renaissance. A cross between artists Hieronymous Bosch and Pieter Bruegel the Elder, Davis merges beautifully realistic landscapes of lakes and snowflakes and silhouetted winter trees with scenes of animated skeletons, fighting rooster-headed men, anthropomorphic insects, marching military eggs and large human ears that spew blood-tinted waterfalls. Mike Davis, with its textured cloth cover, is a luxurious book that showcases over a decade’s worth of the painter’s work. And to think that Davis is a self-taught artist who didn’t start painting until he was in his late thirties – simply mind-boggling.

Mike Davis: A Blind Man’s Journey, by Mike Davis

See sample pages of A Blind Man's Journey: The Art of Mike Davis at Wink.

Terrible origami from $250,000 and under

Etsy user mrimprov is testing the adage that art is what you can get away with, selling Terrible Origami for a quarter million dollars or less. Below are some more reasonably-priced examples.

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Open-source 3D scans of museum items generate amazing new creative works

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Artist Oliver Laric worked with the Usher Gallery and The Collection in Lincoln to create 3D scans of their collections, then made the files available online. The art that emerged is varied and sometimes astonishing, like the work above by Leah Ferrini.

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Star Wars and Bat-signal crayons


Crayontastik melts down "reputable brand crayons" and recasts them in new forms, like this Star Wars set and these Bat-signal crayons.

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Manga cartoonist arrested for her whimsical vagina sculptures

Rokudenashiko, a 42-year-old cartoonist from Japan was arrested this summer for distributing 3-D printable data of her vagina. Now she's in trouble with the law again, this time for an “obscene” art display of whimsical sculptures at a store in Tokyo. The store owner was arrested, too.

Her lawyers are demanding that Igarashi be released, but the court refused to grant the application.

Presiding Judge Noriki Ando based his decision on a "fear she may destroy evidence or flee."

In response, Igarashi said, "I pledge that I will absolutely not destroy evidence or flee."

Here's a profile of Rokudenashiko, showing how she makes her "vagina sculptures."

And here she describes her (successful) plan to make a "pussy kayak":

It is absolutely ridiculous that the Japanese government is keeping her in jail for her cute and funny art.

Detained manga artist denies work modeled on her vagina is obscene

Algorithmically evolved masks that appear as faces to facial-recognition software


Sterling Crispin uses evolutionary algorithms to produce masks that satisfy facial recognition algorithms: "my goal is to show the machine what it’s looking for, to hold a mirror up to the all-seeing eye of the digital-panopticon we live in and let it stare back into its own mind."

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Painted portraits of juggalos


UK born, South African educated painted visited America and produced a series of beautiful portraits of Juggalos.

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Miniature kitchen set sawed from a block of wood

Nice and talented people sometimes send stuff to me in the mail. This little kitchen set sawed from a single block of pine is one my favorites. The Mayor of Mt Holly, MN (pop. 4) made it using a pattern from one of the Foxfire books, "updating it with a few things."

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Lecture on zombies, art, and death

Zombie artist George Pfau sends us, "Zombies Identified: A slideshow-lecture performed for BAASICS 5:Monsters, a free event at ODC Theater in San Francisco."

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Artist turns the world into a museum

shoes

Among other pranksterish activities, Artist Miguel Marquez creates works of art simply by adding signage to things that are already there.

Play thousands of 48-hour game jam entries

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The Ludum Dare international game jam is probably the largest event of its kind -- and the longest running, at over 12 years. Three times a year, game developers are challenged to build and share a new game within 48 hours, often documenting their process and making source code available. Each time, the community votes to agree on a theme.

This year's is 'Entire Game On One Screen.' Which sounds simple, like, 'okay, no iPad companion app,' but it's actually a real design challenge -- just think about how many games have menu screens, inventory screens, y'know, different levels, little things like that.

The submission phase is over, and anyone who wants to dive in can play and rate the 2,637 games, with 1,365 in actual competition (here's a cool entry browser if the website itself is overwhelming). It's fun to get involved, not only to learn more about the rapid prototyping process, but to see the seeds of game design's next wave of inspiration. The winner of the competition is always a creator to watch.

There's often a lot of brilliant weirdness -- like this 'hot n cold' maze game led by staring animals. Or this -- what is this? And there's something about this simple but beautifully-drawn dragon game that takes me back to the interactive net art domains I used to visit in the 90s.

Own original art from In Real Life!


Jen Wang, the artist and writer who co-created the New York Times bestselling graphic novel In Real Life with me, is selling off her original art from the book.

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Hand-illuminated edition of The Silmarillion


Benjamin Harff produced a hand-illuminated edition of Tolkien's The Silmarillion (a famously dense set of myths and background for Middle Earth) as a final project at art school; in this interview, he explains his motivation and his process.

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Beautiful steampunk creatures


Igor Verniy creates amazing steampunk animal junkbots from watch parts, car parts and electronic junk (here's his Etsy store); in this Bored Panda interview, he explains his process.

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Hyper-realistic drawings on plywood

Singaporean artist Ivan Hoo uses pastels, colored pencils, and ink to create realistic drawings on cardboard. The cup on the right is the drawing.

Extrapolating the backgrounds of famous art with machine learning


Yarin Gal's "Extrapolated Art" project uses Photomatch to expand the scenes in classic paintings beyond the boundaries of the canvas -- although it's a spookily convincing effect, it doesn't add much to the art (in most cases, anyway). (via Kottke)

The big book of big of psychedelic fantasy posters

There's a new book out about Big O Posters, which grew out of the graphic design vision of Peter Ledeboer, the charismatic art director of the U.K. incarnation of music and counter-culture magazine Oz, published psychedelic, sci-fi, and fantasy posters from 1967 until 1980.

Originally promoted in the pages of Oz to sell readers full-size posters of the artwork they were enjoying in the magazine, the roster of Big O posters included some of the biggest names in rock art, from Martin Sharp (a pair of album covers for Cream) and Mati Klarwein (Santana’s “Abraxas”) to H.R. Giger (Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s “Brain Salad Surgery”) and Roger Dean (multiple covers for Yes). It’s a big, image-packed tale, which is why The Art of Big O, designed and published by Michael Fishel and written by Nigel Suckling, both of whom were Big O artists, feels so right. It, too, is big and image-packed, capturing both the atmosphere of the London graphic-design world of the 1960s and ’70s as well as the work itself, which is jammed into every nook and cranny of the hefty tome like so many posters tacked to the walls and ceiling of a teenager’s bedroom. The result is less a nostalgic trip down memory lane than a paean to the obsessives who produced and printed this often unapologetically obsessive art.

See sample pages from The Art of Big O on Wink

Incredible embroidered portraits

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Cayce Zavaglia hand-embroiders astonishingly hyperrealistic portraits from cotton and silk thread and crewel embroidery wool.

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