Boing Boing 

Hand-illuminated edition of The Silmarillion


Benjamin Harff produced a hand-illuminated edition of Tolkien's The Silmarillion (a famously dense set of myths and background for Middle Earth) as a final project at art school; in this interview, he explains his motivation and his process.

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Beautiful steampunk creatures


Igor Verniy creates amazing steampunk animal junkbots from watch parts, car parts and electronic junk (here's his Etsy store); in this Bored Panda interview, he explains his process.

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Hyper-realistic drawings on plywood

Singaporean artist Ivan Hoo uses pastels, colored pencils, and ink to create realistic drawings on cardboard. The cup on the right is the drawing.

Extrapolating the backgrounds of famous art with machine learning


Yarin Gal's "Extrapolated Art" project uses Photomatch to expand the scenes in classic paintings beyond the boundaries of the canvas -- although it's a spookily convincing effect, it doesn't add much to the art (in most cases, anyway). (via Kottke)

The big book of big of psychedelic fantasy posters

There's a new book out about Big O Posters, which grew out of the graphic design vision of Peter Ledeboer, the charismatic art director of the U.K. incarnation of music and counter-culture magazine Oz, published psychedelic, sci-fi, and fantasy posters from 1967 until 1980.

Originally promoted in the pages of Oz to sell readers full-size posters of the artwork they were enjoying in the magazine, the roster of Big O posters included some of the biggest names in rock art, from Martin Sharp (a pair of album covers for Cream) and Mati Klarwein (Santana’s “Abraxas”) to H.R. Giger (Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s “Brain Salad Surgery”) and Roger Dean (multiple covers for Yes). It’s a big, image-packed tale, which is why The Art of Big O, designed and published by Michael Fishel and written by Nigel Suckling, both of whom were Big O artists, feels so right. It, too, is big and image-packed, capturing both the atmosphere of the London graphic-design world of the 1960s and ’70s as well as the work itself, which is jammed into every nook and cranny of the hefty tome like so many posters tacked to the walls and ceiling of a teenager’s bedroom. The result is less a nostalgic trip down memory lane than a paean to the obsessives who produced and printed this often unapologetically obsessive art.

See sample pages from The Art of Big O on Wink

Incredible embroidered portraits

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Cayce Zavaglia hand-embroiders astonishingly hyperrealistic portraits from cotton and silk thread and crewel embroidery wool.

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Documentary about former Ren & Stimpy artist, William Wray

I'm a longtime admirer of painter William Wray, who I first learned about from his great art in Ren & Stimpy. In recent years Wray has focused on fine art, and Loic Zimmermann's documentary about Wray is a work of art itself.

After his first encounter with William Wray during an art opening in Los Angeles in May 2013, French visual artist Loic Zimmermann felt the need to follow the California based painter and document his artistic process. This inspiring year long journey of an uncompromising artist, takes us from historical downtown LA to the abandoned towns of Salton-Sea and back to the Artists light filled loft in the LA foothills. The filmmaker explores the artists connections with the superhero impersonators he's portraying for his recent series "Fortress of Delusion" as well as technique he uses to achieve his masterful paintings. It is a film that captures the moments of an Artists thoughts, his motivations, and his understanding of the mechanics behind the bridge between representational and abstract imagery within the painted canvas. It is a moving document of a great american painter.

Gorgeous (unofficial) Star Wars Ep. VII posters by Phil Noto

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Two beautiful posters for the forthcoming Star Wars movie by artist and illustrator Phil Noto: Color, Black and White. “I got so excited after watching the trailer, I had to do some art,” says Phil. “Felt like 6 y.o. me drawing Luke Skywalker after seeing Ep. 4.”

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[HT: Laughing Squid]

Artist controls water "with mind"—and the help of an EEG

In Eunoia II, Lisa Park hooks herself up to Mindlink/Neurosky-type miniature EEG equipment and uses it to manipulate a beautiful and mysterious arrangement of water bowls. [via]

This is a painted wood sculpture

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Amazing carved and painted wood sculptures from artist Tom Eckert.

My sculptures are formed entirely of wood and then painted. I use traditional processes to carve, construct, laminate and paint my pieces. The woods I prefer working with are basswood, linden and limewood (all very similar) chosen because they carve and paint well and are very stable. Coming from a painting and drawing background, I am still interested in applying some of those techniques to my sculptures... “Cloth” carved of wood has much different structural qualities than real cloth. When this idea is applied to my compositions (floating book, floating cards, floating rock) a sense of the impossible happens - for me, magic.

[via]

Fun with guns: the art of the arcade target

targetBen Marks says of Collector's Weekly says: "Did you know that in the good old days, when you paid a quarter for five shots in a shooting gallery, the guy behind the counter would hand you a .22 rifle loaded with real bullets? Neither did I. We just interviewed Richard and Valerie Tucker, who have written a book called Step Right Up! on the cast-iron targets people would shoot at, which have become quite collectible."

Points were tallied when a target was struck, knocked over, or sent spinning in place when shot on one side or the other. From the shooter’s point of view, the arcade was a game of skill. From the standpoint of the carny who was pocketing quarters from the great unwashed, not so much. A horse carrying a rider wouldn’t just move from right to left, it would rock, making it more difficult to hit the rider. But the most deceptive targets were some of the spinners, some of which featured extra-thick bases compared to the ones they might be placed next to, making them all but impossible to turn from the impact of a .22 alone. “On some of those,” says Richard, “you’d almost need a bazooka to make it spin. When you see these things head on, you really don’t realize how thick they are, and how difficult it would be to create a winner.”

Fun with guns: the art of the arcade target

Watercolorbot 2.0


New from Evil Mad Scientist Labs, the 2.0 version of their Watercolorbot, a plotter than uses a brush and a palette of watercolors to automatically paint watercolor pictures.

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Gorgeous wooden PC modeled on old-timey radio

373 "My idea of a compact yet powerful gaming PC with a little style added," writes Jeffrey Stephenson, creator of beautiful wooden computers. "Best viewed with Marvin Gaye playing in the background."

Bottom Feeders: Plates and cups dredged from the sea-bottom



Mary O'Malley's "Bottom Feeders" sculpture-series depicts cups, teapots, plates, saucers and bowls that appear to have been recovered from the sea-bottom, covered in barnacles, coral, tentacles and crustaceans.

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The Nib's indie comics 2015 calendar of obscure holidays

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The Nib, Medium's killer comix publication, is publishing a "2015 Calendar of Obscure Holidays" featuring original artwork by Nib editor Matt "War Is Boring" Bors, Erika Moen, Rich Stevens, Zach Weiner, Jen Sorensen, Brian McFadden, Eleri Harris, Andy Warner, Matt Lubchansky, Liza Donnelly, Scott Bateman, and Gemma Correll who did the cover.

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A master of otherworldly space art

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Above, the extrasolar planet 16 Cygni Bb as rendered by artist Ron Miller, illustrator of science, astronomy, and science fiction, and author of "The Art of Space: The History of Space Art, from the Earliest Visions to the Graphics of the Modern Era."

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Photographs of "hermits" in Eastern Europe

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Traveling through Russia and Ukraine, Danila Tkachenko photographed "people who have decided to escape from social life and lived all alone in the wild nature, far away from any villages, towns or other people. The photo series is titled Escape. From CNN:

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Tkachenko tracked some of them down by calling local authorities, park rangers, newspapers and nature reserves, though it's difficult to track down a man who has chosen to be lost.

"Often the information is not accurate, so many trips went in vain," Tkachenko said.

The hermits live in homes made of local resources -- lumber, burrows in the ground or caves -- and eat what they hunt or gather. If they fall ill, Tkachenko said, they live with the condition or treat themselves with folk methods. He said one man lost his vision completely but continues to live by himself in the woods.

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"Hermits escape from society, find freedom in nature" (CNN)

Escape (Danila Tkachenko)

The trippiest room in Las Vegas

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Over at Medium, Eric Meltzer writes about temporarily destroying his depth perception in Akhob, James Turrell's Ganzfeld light installation tucked away on the top floor of the massive Louis Vuitton store in Las Vegas. It's free, but you'll need a reservation.

Then I started seeing things. At first, blotches on the field of blue. Then the blotches began to move like amoeba. Wave after wave of light and dark swept over the expanse. I blinked, and a yellow-orange afterimage appeared in front of me: hundreds of spinning wheels. I opened my eyes again, and the blotches and waves continued. They got more intense with every color change, and less intense if I looked down at my feet, or over at the curator standing at the edge of the drop off.

Trip Report: Vegas Lights

Brian Ewing show at Chicago's Galerie F


Brian Ewing's delightful, monstrous art has been a regular feature on Boing Boing, and there's a ton of new work to be seen at Galerie F in Chicago this month.

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Superheroes and sf characters in Dutch Renaissance style


Sacha Goldberger's "Super Flemish" series is a spectacular set of images of superheroes, sf movie characters and other futuristic figures (including some of his notorious aged superheroes) in the garb and affect of Dutch Renaissance portraits. (via Neatorama)

Beautiful brain images take over Times Square

Brain City, this beautiful film by Noah Hutton made from neuroimagery collected at leading brain science labs, will screen in New York City just before midnight on Times Square's massive electronic billboards every night this month.

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Street Angel print by Jim Rugg

When a jr. varsity street gang corners a stray dog in a dead-end alley, Street Angel springs into action!

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Dogs playing D&D


Johannes writes, "Poker? Meh! Billards? Bah! Tabletop RPG? YESSS! It's about time the notorious gaming dogs got something relevant to play. Watch closely as they roll dice, check stats, and of course, eat snacks!"

Did we mention they love Vallejo?

Hi-resolution reproduction of original oil painting. Perfect for the game room or office! Just in time for the holidays! Great gift your favorite geek!

Created by Johannes Grenzfurthner with Heather Kelley

Dogs Playing D&D

Robert E. McGinnis - the king of paperback cover art

Today, people buy books on Amazon based on recommendations and reviews. But before that, people browsed in bookstores, airport kiosks, drug stores, and newsstands with precious little information to go on (unless the author was famous). That’s why cover art was so important – shoppers judged books by their cover. And the best cover artist of the mid-20th century was Robert E McGinnis. A new book, The Art of Robert E McGinnis, showcases this major talent.

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Movie poster for imaginary sequel to They Live

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Matt Haley, you are cruel. This is his poster for an imaginary sequel to John Carpenter's 1988 social satire classic, They Live. If it were only so.

See Haley's poster along with many other fake movie posters at the 8-Bit Gallery in Los Angeles. The show is called SEQUEL: Artists Imagine Movie Sequels That Were Never Made and it opens tonight.

Stories are a fuggly hack


My latest Locus Magazine column is Stories Are a Fuggly Hack, in which I point out the limits of storytelling as an artform, and bemoan all the artists from other fields -- visual art, music -- who aspire to storytelling in order to make their art.

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Fantastic Terracotta Warrior statues of Mickey Mouse, Bart, etc.

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My friend Lizabeth Eva Rossof created her own wonderful army of Terracotta Warriors that combine the famous Chinese statues with the heads of American cultural icons like Mickey Mouse, Bart Simpson, Spiderman, Batman, and Shrek.

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Random Darknet Shopper: Internet art randomly spends $100/wk of Bitcoin in darknet


It's part of a Swiss gallery exhibit called The Darknet: From Memes to Onionland, where all the random junk the algorithm buys (from ecstasy to fire brigade master-keys to boxed Tolkien sets) are displayed.

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Dennis Worden's whimsical-yet-menacing wooden sculptures

Cartoonist Dennis Worden has been making some great wooden sculptures lately. This one looks like a nightmarish Cootie Bug game mutant.

Yang Yongliang: astonishing dystopian landscape photos

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Over at Vantage, Yang Yongliang's breathtaking dystopian landscapes, each composited from hundreds of his own photos and video stills of the region around Shanghai, China.

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