Lovely cast aluminum and brass science fiction sculptures

Scott Nelles is a Wisconsin sculptor who works in cast brass and aluminum, making beautiful, whimsical pieces with a strong science fictional flare tinged with strealined dieselpunk. Read the rest

This robotic arm's cleanup task is bloody endless

The Guggenheim has Sun Yuan & Peng Yu’s installation "Can’t Help Myself" on display through March. The robot arm monitors and attempts to contain a viscous blood-red liquid as it spreads out from the base of the arm, spattering more liquid around its enclosure. Read the rest

John Berger’s Ways of Seeing still resonates

Of all the nice tributes since art critics John Berger's death on January 2, this Dazed piece is a short and sweet summation of how far ahead of his time he was. The second episode of Ways of Seeing is a brisk jog through the ways in which the male gaze manifests, even in women:

A woman must continually watch herself. She is almost continually accompanied by her own image of herself. Whilst she is walking across a room or whilst she is weeping at the death of her father, she can scarcely avoid envisaging herself walking or weeping. From earliest childhood she has been taught and persuaded to survey herself continually. And so she comes to consider the surveyor and the surveyed within her as the two constituent yet always distinct elements of her identity as a woman. She has to survey everything she is and everything she does because how she appears to men, is of crucial importance for what is normally thought of as the success of her life. Her own sense of being in herself is supplanted by a sense of being appreciated as herself by another.... One might simplify this by saying: men act and women appear. Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at. This determines not only most relations between men and women but also the relation of women to themselves. The surveyor of woman in herself is male: the surveyed female. Thus she turns herself into an object -- and most particularly an object of vision: a sight.
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Artist ships glass boxes inside FedEx boxes

Walead Beshty created laminated glass boxes the fit exactly inside standard FedEx boxes, then shipped them to varying destinations. The resulting damage and the original box are then paired and displayed, like FedEx® Large Box, LA to NYC, 2007. Read the rest

Blortasia: an abstract art world in the sky

My friend Kevin Mack (who did the Special Effects for Fight Club and many other movies) created a VR art experience called Blortasia for the HTC Vive. Here's a preview.

​Fly freely through a surreal maze of evolving sculptures. Take a break from reality and explore an animated psychedelic sculpture park. Wander through the labyrinth, soar across the open space, or just hang out and let the mesmerizing ever-changing sculptures provide a rejuvenating refuge for your mind. Blortasia combines art and flying in virtual reality.

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Self-defense performance art: Shaun Leonardo's "I Can't Breathe"

Late last year, Shaun Leonardo reprised his art project called "I Can't Breathe." Audience members are paired up and taken through a series of self-defense instructions. It culminates with audience members put in chokeholds by their partners, where they learn that any defensive moves to keep their airways open can be classified as resisting arrest. Read the rest

This Frida Kahlo-themed comic explains the importance of representation

In one simple comic, artist Gavin Aung Than celebrates the power of seeing yourself represented in art:

[via Zen Pencils] Read the rest

Maxime Causeret's gorgeous animation shapes order from chaos

Break out your headphones for this one. Maxime Causeret has created a beautiful animation for Max Cooper's instrumental track "Order from Chaos." Seemingly random elements slowly coalesce into lifelike forms as the track moves from raindrops to increasingly complex sounds. Read the rest

Site helps you draw your own mandalas

ben.akrin.com/mandala is a simple online drawing board with a single purpose: mandalas. Set the axis count, the color and thickness of your pen, and the type of reflection. Then get mandala-making! But I used it to make some vintage lead wallpaper that'll kill you in humid climates. Read the rest

Here's how hand-printed books get those marble-patterned pages

Paper marbling is alive and well at Oberlin College's Letterpress Studio. Alex Fox filmed his friend Jones Pitsker demonstrating a couple of techniques. Read the rest

Short film on Barney Smith’s Toilet Seat Art Museum

San Antonio, Texas has what is probably the world's largest collection of toilet seat art under one roof: Barney Smith’s Toilet Seat Art Museum. Take a couple of minutes to enjoy Wes Plate's profile of a charming old guy's lifelong hobby. Read the rest

Forget filters, this artist adds real flower crowns to statues

Flower-bombing is the new yarn-bombing if Geoffroy Mottart has his way. He creates flower crowns and beards for statues around Brussels, then posts his handiwork online. Read the rest

A candy corn and pretzel fire for your HD fireplace

PES's classic stop-motion animation The Fireplace, newly remastered in 4k.

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Artist creates amazing collages entirely from old denim

Denimu (aka Ian Berry) is a collage artist whose medium is discarded denim clothing. This portrait of Debbie Harry shows the painterly feel of the strips of cloth. Read the rest

Cool hand carved "hobo nickels" up for auction

Exciting news from Heritage Auctions: it's selling the largest number of hobo nickels ever offered in one lot.

A lot of 23 Buffalo Nickels from assorted years  – the largest such lot ever offered in Heritage Auctions’ history – is featured in the firm’s Jan. 4-9 FUN U.S. Coins Auction in Fort Lauderdale.

The coins, known as “hobo nickels,” are modified coinage – commonly nickels – as the Native American chief on the obverse is transformed into tramps, a variety of tribal figures and a myriad of other designs. These carvings often resulted in bas reliefs in the coin, although the contours of the coin still can be felt.

Some buffalo nickel carvers developed a following. The entire collection of 23 coins being offered by Heritage Auctions is attributed to artist John Dorusa, who was a Pennsylvania coal miner.

Dorusa garnered fame for his mimicry of classical hobo nickels created well before he picked up a file for the first time. Dorusa claimed he was trained by Bert Wiegand and George Washington “Bo” Hughes, who are widely considered the forefathers of hobo nickel carving.

Dorusa produced hobo nickels from the 1980s until his death in 1994 and is considered an early modern hobo nickel artist.

For great examples of contemporary hobo nickels, visit the Hobo Nickel Society's Twitter account. Read the rest

Dizzying designs by Peter Kogler seem to warp space

Peter Kogler projects or applies patterns to the surfaces of rooms that can be quite disorienting for anyone who enters. Most of his work uses warped black and white lines to distort the size and shape of floors, walls, and ceilings.

He also makes a lot of cool creations involving images of mice and ants.

Peter Kogler site (via Colossal) Read the rest

Ad for Anti-Communist submarine toy

Artist Randy Regier created the submarine model for this fake cold war era commercial.

"Remember the good old days when American Presidents were afraid of Russia? Rare found footage of a 1950's TV commercial for the TYTON, an anti-Communist submarine toy for "boys who are scared of pinkos."

Written and Directed by Gail Lerner; Mother: Christine Woods; Father: Hayes MacArthur; Son: Dash Williams; Announcer: Jeff Meacham. TYTON toy created by Randy Regier; Producer: Elyse Katz; 1st AD: Lon Takiguchi; DP: Jens Pietrowski; 1st AC: Tony Muller; 2nd AC: Pablo Jara; Gaffer: Skip McGraw; BB Electric: Bob Good; Electric: Abby Antweil, David Darwin, Ken Sylvester; Key Grip: Jason Rez; Grip: Griffin Rez; Dept. Head Make-Up: Nadyne Hicks; Dept. Head Hair: Tyler Ely; Costume Designer: Brandie Reinhold; Costume Asst: Sonya Magrefteh; Sound Mixer: Sterling Moore; Boom: Brian Lerner; Production Designer: Joanne Baker; Set Decorator: Mike Claman; Editor: Colin Campbell; PAs: Chris Clemente, Lauren Mikami, Mark Woodvine. The TYTON originally commissioned by Bill North and the Salina Art Center

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