Don't call Microsoft's upgraded tablet PC the Surface Pro 5

Microsoft announced Tuesday a long-awaited upgrade to its Surface Pro series of high-end tablet PCs, dropping the number from the name and adding Kaby Lake processors, more minutes on a charge and a few dollars to the price tag.

Here's Mark Hachman, Senior Editor at PCWorld:

For Surface Pro 4 owners, the new Surface Pro is a tablet that’s 20 percent faster, with 50 percent more battery life, all for roughly the same price. If you're wondering how Microsoft eked out more battery life, executives said it was a combination of an increased battery capacity as well as efficiencies in both the new Core chip and the Creators Update of Windows 10.

The new low-end fanless model will be good stuff for everyday Windows users wanting a does-it-all gadget.

Tom Warren at The Verge reports that the pen is being significantly upgraded, too, getting tilt detection, 4096 levels of sensitivity and a reduction in activation force: "Inking now feels a lot less laggy and way more responsive on the Surface Pro."

This is key for me. I couldn't quite get used to even the highest-end models in the past because the pen latency was so much worse than Wacom gear or the iPad Pro. I'll check in on the fifth Surface Pro and report back. Read the rest

Just look at these unsanctioned bananas in a highly sanctioned world

Artist Carson Davis Brown creates rogue art installations, and his latest work in progress does not disappoint: unsanctioned bananas the building lobbies. Read the rest

Minimalist tattoos drawn with one continuous line

Berlin-based artist Mo Ganji creates deceptively simple tattoos using a continuous line. Read the rest

Media logos were originally physical sculptures

This behind-the-scenes look at the giant practical set built for HBO's 1983 station identification sequence is impressive. It inspired Christopher Johnson at Colossal to dig into the archives for more great examples, including a vintage logo created 63 years ago for Eurovision: Read the rest

Mythically inspired creatures constructed from assorted animal bones

Art beinArt Gallery in Brunswick, Australia is exhibiting Gerard Geer’s “Chimaephera,” which "features mythically inspired creatures constructed from assorted animal bones and a series of diaphonised wet specimens."

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Dan Hillier on working with Alan Moore on a gorgeous limited edition of "The Call of Cthulhu" for the Folio Society

I was approached by The Folio Society last year to see if I would be up for working on some illustrations for their planned collection of stories from H.P. Lovecraft, 'The Call of Cthulhu & Other Weird Stories', and after a bit of figuring out whether I'd be able to do it justice, due to having preparations for a solo show on the boil at the same time, I jumped right in and ended up having a large hand in its overall design too. Read the rest

Delicate papercraft works of endangered animals

Patrick Cabral is best known for his calligraphy, but he recently created a series of intricate papercraft animal sculptures, with some proceeds going to charity. Read the rest

Watch how an artist makes gorgeous watercolor patterns

Josie Lewis creates beautiful geometric watercolor paintings. In this video, she shows you how if you're ready to move past adult coloring books. Read the rest

Ingenious chalk drawings that "talk"

Greg Dietzenbach added some digital magic to his chalk drawings at last weekend's Chalk the Walk festival in Mount Vernon, Iowa.

"There were a lot of amazing artists but I wanted to do something different," Dietzenbach says. "I wanted people to participate with my art."

(via Laughing Squid)

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The trick to great sand sculpting is the right sand glue

In the world of professional sand sculptors, Toshihiko Hosaka is known for his large commissioned works (like this commissioned Colossal Titan from Shingeki no Kyojin) and for creating an environmentally friendly sand glue, being used in the video above. Read the rest

Indonesian government turns impoverished neighborhood into art

Jodipan was a colorless slum until the local government decided to spend about $22,000 on a colorful makeover. Now the area is a tourist destination. Read the rest

Using FaceApp to put smiles on on museum paintings.

FaceApp is a smartphone app that can add a smile to an unsmiling person's face. Olly Gibbs, the digital and print designer at Empire Magazine, used the app at Amsterdam's Rijksmuseum to improve the paintings on display there.

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Painting reveals interior of Bruegel's Tower of Babel

Artist and animator Katsuhiro Otomo of Akira fame, with collage artist Kōsuke Kawamura, painted this view of the inside of the Tower of Babel, a perfectly fascinating pastiche of Bruegel's original, below.

Eric Stimson reports:

... Kawamura, who colored the painting to closely match the original. Kawamura says that he used over 25,000 layers in his editing software, "the most I've ever done in my life." He also had to carefully set the correct perspective for each brick. In the end, he doesn't even recognize his own work.

Otomo visited the original painting in Rotterdam's Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen so he could study it carefully in detail. He even stumped the resident curators with his questions. For instance, they weren't sure where the tower's entrance was, but Otomo thinks he found it. He also noticed a river flowing into the tower and in the background, so he included it in his cutaway.

Modeling the Library of Babel in Sketchup. Read the rest

Mind-bending infinite gif loop for psychedelia festival

O.Z.O.R.A. Festival is billed as a psychedelic tribal gathering in Dádpuszta, Hungary. Their website splash page is a gorgeous infinite gif that you can set to trance or chill music. Read the rest

The glitched-out, large-scale murals of Felipe Pantone

Felipe Pantone, a graffiti artist based in Valencia, Spain, does these amazing, cyberspace-is-everting murals, skinning buildings and even cars all around the world. (via JWZ) Read the rest

Book chronicles artists' calling cards over the centuries

Oracles is a new book that presents 123 notable calling cards in an interesting way: as facsimiles of the originals, inserted into a two-page spread giving context. Read the rest

Forthcoming game evokes style of legendary artist Moebius

Shedworks is making a video game and I don't care what it's about or whether it's "good" because it looks like Jean "Moebius" Giraud drew every frame of the teaser animations, and I am sold. Emerging from a shed in North London, the unnamed project is by Gregorios Kythreotis and Daniel Fineberg.

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