Fantastic photos from 1969 Life book, Drugs

Nothing screams DRUGS! as much as middle-aged dudes posing next to pop art paper collages.

From DRUGS, a volume in the Life Science Library. This version 1969, originally published 1967. Background artwork by Donald Miller and Yale Joel, collaged (ie photos added) by David Gordon and Nancy Genet.

(Via Found Objects)

The Art of Fred Gambino: Dark Shepherd

Fred Gambino has worked as a diverse illustrator and artist, providing sci-fi book covers for publishing houses and high-profile concept art for a wide array of television programs, films and video games.

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Business Week's Dov Charney cover channels Andy Warhol

How the cover for Business Week's Dov Charney story was made. (And here's the story behind Esquire's 1969 cover.)

I couldn't figure out this optical illusion painting until the very end

"Found at Gallery at Ice in Windsor, UK painted by Brian Weavers."

Sculptures of condiment containers


Artist Robin Antar makes stone sculptures of everyday objects.

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Jimbo Phillips: the world's greatest snot artist

“My dad always told me not to be an artist,” says Santa Cruz Skateboards artist Jimbo Phillips to Ben Marks. “He said, ‘You should be a dentist and make some real money.’”

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Cartoon kittens and big-eyed puppies: how we bought into processed pet food

Ben Marks of Collectors Weekly says: "Last week, Wink published a review of Cat Food for Thought and Dog Food for Thought by Warren Dotz. Coincidentally, we had an interview with Warren in the works, which we just published, along with a few of the mid-20th-century pet-food labels from his book."

Here's a snip of Warren talking about some of the auctions he won to build up his collection:

“I found a scrapbook made by a woman who had collected all the food labels she used from 1970 to 1972,” recalls Dotz of one auction. “I also found a supermarket’s salesman's catalog that contained all the labels for its generic, store-branded products. When I bought that catalog, I was hoping I would find a fantastic pet-food label, and sure enough I did. It was for a brand of cat food called Corky — it looks almost like the Napster logo.”

Cartoon kittens and big-eyed puppies: how we bought into processed pet food

Corrupted coloring book pages

From Neatorama: "Coloring Book Corruptions is a delightful demonstration of what happens when you combine a sick mind and children’s entertainment. The anonymous artist adds his/her drawings, but invites you to submit your own."

Coloring Book Corruptions [NSFW]

The Art of Ian Miller [exclusive excerpt]

Featuring over 300 pieces of artwork spanning decades of Ian’s work, The Art of Ian Miller is a treat for all lovers of great fantasy art – from Lovecraft novel covers to Tolkien bestiaries to Warhammer 40,000 concept art, through a veritable trove of gothic humour, fantasy battles, dragons, beasts and a world of nightmarish visions.

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What makes something ugly?

These 1940s “feature matches” are violent, racist, and decorated beyond function. (Photos by Frank Kelsey)

Ben Marks of Collectors Weekly says: "Lisa Hix has just finished an interview with London-based author and design critic Stephen Bayley, who spoke with her about Ugly: The Aesthetics of Everything. In our piece, the two discuss the intensely subjective nature of the things we perceive as being beautiful or ugly."

Ugliness is also surprisingly hard to design on purpose, as Bayley discovered both teaching and speaking with architecture students. “If you give a class of architecture students a project, saying ‘Please design an ugly building,’ they actually find that difficult. It’s very difficult to create ugliness, although you wouldn’t believe it by walking around in any big city. Ugliness often is just an accident, but it’s often utterly fascinating.”

Reading Ugly, it’s not too difficult to suss out Bayley’s personal preferences: He’s all about clean lines, right angles, and functionality; he finds neutral colors and the natural tones of wood more tasteful than bright hues or shiny things. He’s got no use for elaborate glass paperweights, loathes taxidermy and all Victorian hobbies that attempt to capture and catalog nature, finds tattoos tacky, and has no patience for mid-Century kitsch relating to Elvis, Vegas, or tiki bars—things like aloha T-shirts, souvenir mugs, or velvet paintings.

“I’m aesthete at heart,” confesses Bayley, who also published a book called Taste: The Secret Meaning of Things in 1992. “I’m one of those people, for good or for bad, who determine the value in anything by its appearance. People think appearance is superficial. I don’t. I think appearances matter, and actually the classical Greeks felt the same. They thought beauty had a moral character. That’s my fundamental view of the world. I can’t walk down the street and not be both exhilarated by beautiful cars and beautiful buildings and dismayed and depressed by ugly cars and ugly buildings. I am just one of those poor souls.”

Think You Know Ugly? Think Again

Please enjoy this massive online trove of Classical Realist paintings

Gerald F. Metcalfe (1894-1929), Pan, Oil on canvas

My friend Rob Walker writes a great column every Friday on Yahoo Tech called The New Old Thing, which "tells you about what’s not-new—but still great and available to you right now thanks to the magic of technology." His latest column is about my recommendation, The Art Renewal Center.

The Art Renewal Center bills itself as “leading the revival of realism in the fine arts,” and it’s fair to say that founder Fred Ross has a passionate point of view about the value of realism and modernist efforts (in his view) to denigrate it.

“Before visiting Artrenewal.org for the first time (about 10 years ago),” Frauenfelder says, “I’d never heard of William Bouguereau, Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, John William Waterhouse, Lord Frederic Leighton, Ernest Louis Meissonier, Edward Coley Burne-Jones, Frank Dicksee, James Joseph Tissot, or John William Godward.

“Looking at their work makes me feel like I’ve entered a secret museum that was closed off to the public for fear of a mass outbreak of Stendhal syndrome.”

Please Enjoy This Massive Online Trove of Classical Realist Painting

Pigeon Press features original art from some of my favorite cartoonists

Daniel Clowes, Charles Burns, Ivan Brunetti... three fantastic artists who are part of the new Pigeon Press Gallery, founded by Alvin Buenaventura (editor of The Art of Daniel Clowes). Pigeon Press sells original art and limited prints. They will also be publishing comics later this year, and I'm looking forward to this, because Alvin published a bunch of great books and comics (as well as the stupendous Comic Art magazine) in years past when he ran Buenaventura Publishing.

Pigeon Press

Remix classic art, win a prize

The Netherlands' Rijksmuseum encourages the public to download and remix its 150,000 artistic masterworks. Now, it's sponsoring a contest. Use their art to create new art and you could win €1,500 and a chance to sell your work in their museum shop.

Art on Ice in Minneapolis

Every two years, Minnesota artists build a temporary village on a frozen lake near Minneapolis, crafting colorful, creative parodies of traditional ice fishing shanties that are open to the public for four weekends. The event is juried. Dozens of groups submit proposals for shanties, but only 20 are chosen. Each shanty has a theme, and each theme comes with some kind of interactive programming — whether scheduled events or stuff to do in the shanty as you wander through. In 2012, 20,000 people visited the shanties at Medicine Lake. (That year, I followed some Minneapolis makers as they built and launched their monster-themed shanty.)

The 2014 Art Shanty Project opened last weekend on White Bear Lake, north of St. Paul, and my husband I took our daughter and went to see what we could see.

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"The Toy" by Ray and Charles Eames

Socks Studio has a short article and a bunch of photos of "The Toy."

“The Toy” was a self-assembly project made in 1951 by Charles and Ray Eames and sold by Sears, Roebuck and Co. This construction kit for children sums up the simplicity and playfulness of most of the Eames’ works. It comprised dowels with pierced ends, pipe cleaners and brightly colored panels (four square and four triangles) of plastic-coated resistant stiff paper. The pieces of “the Toy” came packed in a hexagonal tube and could be used to produce multiple structures, playhouses, theatres and shelters.

"The Toy" by Charles and Ray Eames (Via This Isn't Happiness)