Reuters editor-in-chief instructs journalists on how to cover the new Administration

Reuters Editor-in-Chief Steve Adler is proud of the way his news organization is able to provide high-quality, fact-based journalism in oppressive places like Turkey, the Philippines, Egypt, Iraq, Yemen, Thailand, China, Zimbabwe, and Russia, "nations in which we sometimes encounter some combination of censorship, legal prosecution, visa denials, and even physical threats to our journalists." Here's his list of dos and don'ts for staffers:

Do’s:

--Cover what matters in people’s lives and provide them the facts they need to make better decisions.

--Become ever-more resourceful: If one door to information closes, open another one.

--Give up on hand-outs and worry less about official access. They were never all that valuable anyway. Our coverage of Iran has been outstanding, and we have virtually no official access. What we have are sources.

--Get out into the country and learn more about how people live, what they think, what helps and hurts them, and how the government and its actions appear to them, not to us.

--Keep the Thomson Reuters Trust Principles close at hand, remembering that “the integrity, independence and freedom from bias of Reuters shall at all times be fully preserved.”

Don’ts:

--Never be intimidated, but:

--Don’t pick unnecessary fights or make the story about us. We may care about the inside baseball but the public generally doesn’t and might not be on our side even if it did.

--Don’t vent publicly about what might be understandable day-to-day frustration. In countless other countries, we keep our own counsel so we can do our reporting without being suspected of personal animus.

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You know who else invested in infrastructure? Autobahn spending was key to Hitler's consolidation of power

In Highway to Hitler, Nico Voigtländer (UCLA) and Hans‐Joachim Voth (University of Zurich)'s 2014 paper analyzing the impact of the massive infrastructure investment in creating the Autobahn, the authors conclude that the major spending project was key to Hitler's consolidation of power. Read the rest

Handy checklist for people interested in implementing a fascist takeover

This is from the U.S. Holocaust Museum.

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Was this weekend a trial balloon for a coup?

"Yesterday was the trial balloon for a coup d’état against the United States," writes Yonatan Zunger on Medium. The "administration is testing the extent to which the DHS (and other executive agencies) can act and ignore orders from the other branches of government. This is as serious as it can possibly get: all of the arguments about whether order X or Y is unconstitutional mean nothing if elements of the government are executing them and the courts are being ignored."

Combining all of these facts, we have a fairly clear picture in play. Trump was, indeed, perfectly honest during the campaign; he intends to do everything he said, and more. This should not be reassuring to you. The regime’s main organizational goal right now is to transfer all effective power to a tight inner circle, eliminating any possible checks from either the Federal bureaucracy, Congress, or the Courts. Departments are being reorganized or purged to effect this. The inner circle is actively probing the means by which they can seize unchallenged power; yesterday’s moves should be read as the first part of that. The aims of crushing various groups — Muslims, Latinos, the black and trans communities, academics, the press — are very much primary aims of the regime, and are likely to be acted on with much greater speed than was earlier suspected. The secondary aim of personal enrichment is also very much in play, and clever people will find ways to play these two goals off each other.

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Trump's first 4 days: a ban on disclosing scientific facts and felony charges for journalists

It's only been a handful of days since Donald Trump took office, but we're already getting strong signals about the sort of administration he intends to run: workers at US government agencies have been banned from making any public disclosures of the research they conduct at public expense until new political minders can be installed to ensure that these facts don't contradict Trump's official narrative; and six journalists have been charged with felonies for covering the protests during the inauguration.

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Wisconsin capitol bans recording, flags, reading, balloons, chairs, bags, backpacks, photography, etc etc etc

"Populist" Wisconsin governor Scott Walker continues to restrict the freedom of Wisconsinites to seek redress of grievances in their state capitol. The latest "decorum" rules handed down by Walker's sergeant-at-arms include a ban on signs, silently reading, photography, video or audio recording, bags, backpacks, clapping, cheering, balloons, crockpots, food storage, beds, sleeping bags, musical instruments, flags, chairs, and anything "inconsistent" with closing the building at end of day.

More rules released for State Capitol visitors (Thanks, Elix, via Submitterator!)

(Image: Madison Wisconsin Protest, Capitol Square [IMG_2782], a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (2.0) image from ontask's photostream)  Wisconsin Republicans call for arrest of missing Democrats - Boing ... Wisconsin protests--now with farmers (and tractors) - Boing Boing Nerd power at Wisconsin protests - Boing Boing Wisconsin update: More to come later today - Boing Boing Wisconsin Capitol illegally closed to newcomers - Boing Boing Wisconsin cops for the win - Boing Boing Midwestern Tahrir: Workers refuse to leave Wisconsin capital over ... Exposing the Big Wisconsin Lie about "subsidized public pensions ... Egyptian orders a pizza for the Wisconsin demonstrators - Boing Boing Read the rest