Car Hacker's Handbook

Dual core writes, "Car Hacker's Handbook is a book on car hacking licensed under Creative Commons."

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New kind of rotary engine - hypnotic!

Duke Engines demonstrate a new kind of internal combustion engine, based on a crazy, hypnotic, rotary system. I lack the mechanical engineering chops to know whether this is any good, but it's fun to watch. (via Sploid)

Tesla's "car-as-service" versus your right to see your data

Espen got a parking ticket for his Tesla, and he's pretty sure he can exonerate himself, if only the company would give him access to his car's data, but they won't.

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Songs for the carpool lane

Speedtalking math-vlogger Vi Hart isn't just a math wizard: she's also a brilliant songstress.

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SF city attorney demands shutdown of parking-space-auctioning app

Monkeyparking, the app that lets assholes auction off their parking spots, has been sent a cease-and-desist letter by San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera, who says the practice of selling your public parking spot is illegal. Monkeyparking's competition are expected to receive the same treatment soon.

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Stretch limo made from three bodged-together Deloreans


Redditor Viking 187 posted this image of a stretch Delorean made from three deloreansworth of parts -- Marsandtherealgirl has context for it:

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Dream Cars: the lost wonders of the automotive age


Dream Cars, an exhibition at Atlanta's High Museum, features the most amazing, doomed, gorgeous automotive designs of the automotive age. Streamlined or blobby, three-wheeled or magnificently finned, these are the cars that leapt off the cover of popular science pulps and into the showrooms, where they died an obscure death. The museum's site has some beautiful photos and curatorial notes on each of the cars in the exhibition, which runs to Sept 7.

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Small town sheriff buys tank: "the United States of America has become a war zone"

Rural counties across Indiana have been purchasing Afghanistan-surplus tanks with gunner turrets and heavy armour; most recently, it was Johnson County, whose Sheriff, Doug Cox, justified the purchase by saying, "The United States of America has become a war zone."

The 55,000lb "mine resistant ambush protected" tank (MRAP) was a steal at $5,000 (original price: $733,000), part of a bizarro-world peace dividend from the Afghanistan and Iraq drawdown, which sees the toolsuite of a military occupying force being flogged at knock-down rates to macho shithead sheriffs across the American heartland for deployment against American civilians.

For example, Johnson County SWAT used their MRAP to break up a fight between two drunks, and in Morgan County, the requisition for their MRAP said it was to be used for a variety of purposes, including "drug search warrants and felony arrest warrants." By and large, counties acquiring these tanks have no formal policy about when and how they can be used.

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John Waters's Carsick: a memoir of hitchhiking from Baltimore to San Francisco


National treasure John "Pink Flamingos" Waters just published Carsick, a book about his adventures hitchhiking from Baltimore to San Francisco (readers will remember that he got picked up by an indie band on the road). The Baltimore Sun interview with him about the book is a mix of heartwarming tales about how good Americans are to weirdo hitchhikers, depressing ruminations on why he won't be making any more movies anytime soon (Hollywood only wants $300M "tentpole movies" with a lot of explosions), and hilarity from the road. This looks like a hell of a book.

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Multi-storey minibus


This multi-storey VW minibus comes from Berger Stadel Walsh of Basel. I'm not clear on whether it's a shoop or a magnificent folly, but I prefer to imagine the latter.

Moscow activists step into the path of cars driving on the sidewalk

Here's a highlight reel of the adventures of a Moscow youth-group whose members physically place their bodies in the path of cars whose drivers insist on driving on sidewalks to beat Moscow's epic traffic. It's an inspiring couple of minutes of semi-suicidal bravery in the service of pedestrianism. (via Reddit)

Original 1971 Disney World monorail for sale


The Buy It Now price on this 1971 Mark IV red Walt Disney World monorail cab is a paltry $189K. So far, no takers. LOOK AT THAT CONTROL PANEL. The 1% is wasted on the 1%.

App lets you auction your San Francisco parking spot

A new mobile app called Monkeyparking allows people in San Francisco with good parking spots to auction them off when they're ready to leave, permitting circling rich people to engage in excitingly dangerous class warfare by bidding on spaces with their phones while they drive. The app's creators defend it as providing an "incentive" to leave your space for others to use.

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USB recharger battery that can also jumpstart your car

Junopower is advertising presales of a portable device-charging USB battery called the "Jumpr" that can discharge its stored power at 300 amps, which is sufficient to jumpstart many automobile engines. They're billing it as a pocket-sized, 7 oz alternative to the trunk-sized emergency jumpstart kits that also recharges your phones and tablets. Pre-orders are $70 and they're promising shipments some time in May.

JUMPR - Car's best Friend (Presale) (via Red Ferret)

LAPD says every car in Los Angeles is part of an ongoing criminal investigation


The Electronic Frontier Foundation is trying to figure out what the LAPD is doing with the mountains (and mountains) of license-plate data that they're harvesting in the city's streets without a warrant or judicial oversight. As part of the process, they've asked the LAPD for a week's worth of the data they're collecting, and in their reply brief, the LAPD argues that it can't turn over any license-plate data because all the license-plates they collect are part of an "ongoing investigation," because every car in Los Angeles is part of an ongoing criminal investigation, because some day, someone driving that car may commit a crime.

As EFF's Jennifer Lynch says, "This argument is completely counter to our criminal justice system, in which we assume law enforcement will not conduct an investigation unless there are some indicia of criminal activity."

This reminds me of the NSA's argument that they're collecting "pieces of a puzzle" and Will Potter's rebuttal: "The reality is that the NSA isn't working with a mosaic or a puzzle. What the NSA is really advocating is the collection of millions of pieces from different, undefined puzzles in the hopes that sometime, someday, the government will be working on a puzzle and one of those pieces will fit." The same thing could be said of the LAPD.

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