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Nominate your Internet heroes for the 2015 EFF Pioneer Awards

Previous winners include Edward Snowden, Carl Malamud, Limor Fried, Laura Poitras, Hddy Lamarr, Aaron Swartz, Gigi Sohn, Bruce Schneier, Zoe Lofgren, Glenn Greenwald, Jon Postel and many others (I am immensely proud to have won one myself!).

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Book review: Neal Stephenson's “Seveneves” has too little humanity in the characters

Stephenson’s new novel doesn’t generate the kind of excitement for the future that we’ve come to expect from the author of Snow Crash, The Diamond Age, and Anathem.Read the rest

Wife plugged in to alarm clock

Alex of Weird Universe wrote: "Sounds to me like Anna Hindman had good cause for wanting to divorce her husband [in 1938], namely a) his belief that 4 hours sleep is all anyone needs, and b) wiring her bed to shock her every 4 hours to prevent her from sleeping longer than that. But according to the news reports, she eventually forgave him and withdrew her divorce petition — after he got rid of the 'shocking machine.'"

The Dead Mountaineer's Inn by Boris and Arkady Strugatsky

The Dead Mountaineer's Inn: One More Last Rite for the Detective Genre (Neversink)

From Russia's masters of science fiction comes a manorhouse murder mystery parody that puts Clue to shame. The Dead Mountaineer's Inn is every bit as clever, and queer, a novel as I've come to expect from the brothers Strugatsky.

Visiting a remote ski chalet, Inspector Glebsky just wants to relax and unwind. In the manner of an Agatha Christie novel, the Strugatsky's characters are introduced and shortly events unfurl. Everyone is trapped at the chalet and there is a dead body. Well, it is probably a dead body, and it is probably human, but the more Glebsky investigates the less he really knows.

Roadside Picnic is one of my favorite science fiction novels. It is absolutely wonderful on so many levels, I'd wondered if other works by the Strugatsky's could possibly impress me as much. While The Dead Mountaineer's Inn may not leave you pondering the crushing irrelevance of humanity, is fantastic and will not disappoint.

The Dead Mountaineer's Inn: One More Last Rite for the Detective Genre (Neversink)

WAS: a new edition of Geoff Ryman's World Fantasy-nominated Oz novel


The novel tore my heart out in 1992: a contrafactual memoir of L Frank Baum; a desperately poor girl called Dorothy Gael from Manhattan, KS; and a makeup artist on the set of the classic MGM film.

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Who Censored Roger Rabbit?

Who Censored Roger Rabbit?

I've always enjoyed Gary Wolf's Who Censored Roger Rabbit? far more than the movie adaption. Dark and gritty, this noir fantasy is a thriller!

As usual, the book is much better than the movie. Who Censored Roger Rabbit? is a surreal film noir story, that fans of Chandler and Hammet will appreciate, albeit with toons as major characters. Not written for a Disney audience, and certainly clumsy in spots, (like plot resolution,) this story is far, far more entertaining. You'll see a lot of parallels to the film, but the more adult approach and theme fit the genre so much better. I can no longer view ToonTown in the same light.

Eddie, Roger, Jessica and all your favorite Who Framed Roger Rabbit? characters are here, but darker and more interesting. If you enjoyed the movie, Who Censored Roger Rabbit? is a must read.

Who Censored Roger Rabbit? by Gary Wolf via Amazon

Exclusive excerpt from new Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas graphic novel

Fear and Loathing cover for BB

Here's an exclusive excerpt of Hunter S. Thompson's Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, a new graphic novel adapted by Troy Little and published by Top Shelf Productions. Available in October. Meet Troy Little, at both Top Shelf booth #1721 and IDW booth #2743, throughout Comic-Con. Fear and Loathing for BB_01 Fear and Loathing for BB_02 Fear and Loathing for BB_03 Fear and Loathing for BB_04 Fear and Loathing for BB_05 Fear and Loathing for BB_06

Kickstarting custom cellular automata scarves


Noah writes, "Fabienne Serriere, a hacker and machine knitting enthusiast, is running a Kickstarter currently for provably unique mathematical scarves modeled off of cellular automaton and made of Merino wool.

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Sandman Slim: Killing Pretty

James Stark's returned to LA from hell's gladiator pits and has been tearing things up ever since -- but what do you get for the monster who has everything?

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Canada's brave resistance versus America's giant killer robots


Brian K "Saga" Vaughan's new comic We Stand On Guard pits plucky Canadian guerrillas against an invading army of killer American mechas.

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Magician Andrew Mayne discusses and signs his novel, Name of the Devil

Magician, author, and inventor Andrew Mayne, star of A&E's magic reality show Don't Trust Andrew Mayne will be one of our featured guests/workshop runners at our Weekend of Wonder extravaganza (Sept. 18-20 in Riverside, CA). He's also going to discuss and sign his new thriller, Name of the Devil: A Jessica Blackwood Novel on Tuesday, July 7th at 6:30pm at Diesel, A Bookstore in Brentwood, California.

In this electrifying sequel to the crowd-pleasing thriller Angel Killer (4.5 stars with 276 reviews on Amazon), magician-turned-FBI agent Jessica Blackwood must once again draw on her past to go up against a brutal murderer desperate for revenge at any price. After playing a pivotal role in the capture of the Warlock, a seemingly supernatural serial killer -- and saving the FBI's reputation in the process -- agent Jessica Blackwood can no longer ignore the world she left behind. Formerly a prodigy in a family dynasty of illusionists, her talent and experience endow her with a unique understanding of the power and potential of deception, as well as a knack for knowing when things are not always as they appear to be.

When a church congregation vanishes under mysterious circumstances in rural Appalachia, the bizarre trail of carnage indicates the Devil's hand at work. But Satan can't be the suspect, so FBI consultant Dr. Ailes and Jessica's boss on the Warlock case, Agent Knoll, turn to the ace up their sleeve: Jessica. She's convinced that an old cassette tape holds the key to the mystery, and unraveling the recorded events reveals a troubling act with far-reaching implications. The evil at work is human, and Jessica must follow the trail from West Virginia to Mexico, Miami, and even the hallowed halls of the Vatican. Can she stop a cold-blooded killer obsessed by a mortal sin -- or will she become the next target in a twisted, diabolical game of hunter and prey?

Would you like to learn from Andrew how to invent and make cool stuff? You can! Register here to join us at Boing Boing's Weekend of Wonder.

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Fracketeering: Life in a capitalist sci-fi horror story

Fracking is the perfect metaphor for the service-charge, extraction oriented economy: "suck up a sky’s worth of valuable gas through a massive crack pipe, then pack up and lumber off to fracture and steal someone else’s underground treasure."

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Winners of the 2015 Locus Awards!

The winners from last night's Locus Awards Banquet in Seattle have been announced:

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New York from space towel


From Schönstaub, who make the amazing sized-to-order celestial rugs, comes the NYC from space beach-towel.

Stephen Harper ready to sign TPP and throw Tory rural base under the bus

The Canadian Prime Minister said he'd only sign the secretive Trans Pacific Partnership if it had safeguards for Canada's farmers, but now that it's clear that he hasn't got a hope in hell of being re-elected, he's ready to sign TPP and damn the farmers.

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Beer to be named after Joe Paterno, late coach who enabled Jerry Sandusky sex abuse

Jerry Sandusky, L, and Joe Paterno, R.  [Reuters]


Jerry Sandusky, L, and Joe Paterno, R. [Reuters]

For fans of beer honoring a sex-abuse enabler, this one's for you.

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Monster Cable founder sad about getting $0 from Apple's $3 billion purchase of Beats By Dr. Dre

famous-monsters

Noel Lee says he invented the headphones that are marketed by Beats by Dr. Dre. In May 2014, Apple paid $3 billion to buy Beats by Dr. Dre.

Dr. Dre and music producer Jimmy Iovine got most of the proceeds of the sale and Lee got $0. Now Lee is suing for at least $150 million. Lee is the founder of Monster Cable, a company with an obnoxious reputation for threatening to sue any company that uses the word "Monster." I can't help feeling a bit of schadenfreude towards Lee, who has made many people miserable by hitting them with time- and money-wasting legal threats.