The Ghostly Thief of Time, a book for adventurous kids


Hey, the second book in my kids' book series is out today! It's Ghostly Thief of Time: The EMU Club Adventures, Book Two.

In this thrilling installment, the kids stop arguing about who is the leader of the club long enough to solve a mystery we've all wondered about: Why does time move so slowly at certain times, like right at the end of a school day?

But, as in Book One (Alien Invasion in My Backyard), the answer to this ordinary, mundane mystery is anything but ordinary and mundane. The kids discover ghostly apparitions, time-space conundrums and mysterious technology that force them to try to save themselves, their school, and maybe the world.

Wow, what a nice reaction I got to the first book. It got some wonderful reviews , and kids really seem to love these stories. As Cory said, these books are "for the curious and adventurous," and I hope you have the good fortune to know a kid who is both.

I also hope you'll enjoy a piece Boing Boing will run this week about the differences, and similarities, I've found between creating for adults (Tom the Dancing Bug) and for kids.



You can order Ghostly Thief of Time: The EMU Club Adventures, Book Two on Amazon. Also, for a limited time, you can order both books, signed, sketched & delivered, as a set.

P.S. Here's Ruben on the kidlit inspirations for The EMU Club Adventures. — Ed. Read the rest

Made to Kill: 1960s killer-robot noir detective novel

In Made to Kill, Adam Christopher presents us with a mashup of Raymond Chandler and Philip K Dick: the world's last robot (all the others were destroyed after they stole everyone's jobs) and his boss, a building-sized computer, who operate a private detective agency that's a front for an assassination business. And business is good.

Gorgeous book of paper airplanes collected by anthropologist Harry Smith


h Brian writes, "Avant-garde film maker and producer of the highly influential Anthology of American Folk Music series Harry Smith was also an avid collector of folk art. This book compiles some 251 paper airplanes Smith collected from off the streets of New York City, along with the date and location at which they were recovered. It's a really beautiful collection." Read the rest

Welp, here is the actual cover of Donald Trump's new book


Angry rich crackpot racist Donald Trump would like you to know that he is very angry, and that's why this is the cover of his new book. Extra points to The Donald for casually insulting every single American who has physical disabilities.

Read the rest

Kickstarting an exciting feminist steampunk bicycle-racing novel


You may remember Elly Blue from Pedal Zombies, a kickstarted collection of feminist science fiction about zombies and bicycles. Now she's back with a new crowdfunding drive for a feminist steampunk cycling novel called The Velocipede Races. Read the rest

Book and Bed: Tokyo's coffin hotel/bookstore


If you're in Ikebukuro and need a cozy, bookish bed for the night, try Book and Bed, a "designed hostel" that hides coffin-hotel-style bunks among bookshelves lined with handsome volumes and rolling ladders. The books aren't for sale, but you're welcome to read them in your bunk. Read the rest

Kim Stanley Robinson's "Aurora": space is bigger than you think

Kim Stanley Robinson's Aurora is the best book I read in 2015, and by "best" I mean, "most poetic" and "most thought provoking" and "most scientific," a triple-crown in science fiction that's practically unheard of. I wouldn't have believed it possible, even from Robinson, had I not read it for myself.

Beautiful, free/open 3D printed book of lost Louis H. Sullivan architectural ornaments


Tom Burtonwood creates 3D printed books of dimensional, public domain architectural elements: in 2013, he made Orihon and in 2014 he made Folium, which featured work from Ancient Egypt to Louis Sullivan department store decorations. Now he's released a new work: "Twenty Something Sullivan." Read the rest

Peter Beagle's Last Unicorn and many rarities available in ebook form (finally!)


The classic fantasy novel The Last Unicorn is finally available in ebook form; there's a deluxe edition that includes the sequel Two Hearts and an interview with Beagle. Read the rest

Nerd heroes read "There's a Zombie in My Treehouse"


Len Peralta writes, "Ken Plume, John Robinson and I have been releasing different celebrity readings of our book There's A Zombie In My Treehouse just in time for Halloween. We've been releasing one track a day for the past week and a half up until Halloween. Some of the readers include Tom Kenny (Spongebob Squarepants/Adventure Time), Billy West (Futurama), Dana Snyder (Aqua Teen Hunger Force) and the whole cast of MST3K. Upcoming celebrity readers include The Venture Brothers Doc Hammer and Jackson Public, John Hodgman and Jonathan Coulton. It's a fun read and listen for Halloween." Read the rest

The Abaddon: graphic novel based loosely on Sartre's No Exit

In Koren Shadmi’s The Abaddon, five dysfunctional roommates are trapped in an otherworldly apartment, echoing Jean-Paul Sartre’s classic 1944 play No Exit. In the beginning of The Abaddon, central character Ter finds himself immediately and irrevocably trapped in a literal Abaddon: a place of destruction; the depths of hell.

Come see Cory at Santa Monica's Diesel Books on Thursday


We're launching the new paperback edition of "Information Doesn't Want to Be Free, my book of practical advice and theory for artists trying to make sense of the net (it features intros by Neil Gaiman and Amanda Palmer, too!) at Santa Monica's Diesel Books. Read the rest

Ministry of Irony: Orwell estate tries to censor mentions of the number 1984


The Orwell estate filed a bogus copyright and publicity right theft against an inactive Cafepress store where no one had ever bought one of the "1984 is already here" shirts or tea-towels on offer from film critic Josh Hadley. Read the rest

Ta-Nehisi Coates's "Between the World and Me" is the next book you should read

Between the World and Me is the memoir of Ta-Nehisi Coates -- certified genius and author of many seminal essays on race in America. It is a work of rage and beauty, and it should be the very next thing you read.

Fable Comics: anthology of great comics artists telling fables from around the world

Firstsecond's new Fable Comics is the third knockout anthology in which amazing, hugely varied comics creators recreate some of the world's best loved stories. As with Nursery Rhyme Comics and Fairy Tale Comics, Fable Comics draws from diverse source material and presents it in varied, fresh ways that have something for everyone.

How a mathematician teaches "Little Brother" to a first-year seminar


Derek Bruff teaches a first-year college writing seminar in mathematics, an unusual kind of course that covers a lot of ground, and uses a novel as some of its instructional material -- specifically, my novel Little Brother. Read the rest

WHAT IF: Hermione made Harry and Ron do their own goddamned homework?

giphy (1)

Anyone who's paid close attention knows that the series should really be called "Hermoine Granger and the Repeated Rescue of the Lazy, Glory-Hogging Boys," but as usual, Mallory Ortberg (previously) brings it all home with some scathing and witty fanfic: Read the rest

More posts