Boing Boing 

Apex: final Nexus book merges the drug war with transhumanism

Ramez Naam's Nexus trilogy has concluded with a huge, thrilling, globe-spanning book called Apex that nailed it.Read the rest

Leetspeak, circa 1901


The telegraph operators of the early 20th century had a rich vocabulary of wrist-saving abbreviations they used among themselves: "Is tt exa tr et?" ("Is that extra there yet?")

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Dragons Beware: Claudette's back in the sequel to Giants Beware!

2012's Giants Beware introduced Claudette and her adventuring pals in one of the strongest, funniest YA graphic novels I've ever enjoyed; the followup, Dragons Beware keeps all the charm and excitement while advancing the story.Read the rest

Jules Verne's The Blockade Runners, free for various e-readers

The Blockade Runners

Running the Union blockade starts as just a daring adventure, but rapidly turns into a rescue mission in The Blockade Runners! This short story by Jules Verne is free for Kindle and many other formats!

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Librarians: privacy's champions


Libraries have always been places where people gathered for intellectual inquiry, where communities could form around emerging ideologies that challenged the status quo.

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LISTEN: MIT discussion about online harassment

Andrew writes, "Last night MIT's Comparative Media Studies/Writing program hosted Brianna Wu of Giant Spacekat and law professor Danielle Keats Citron, author of Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. With their permission, we recorded the talk (AIFF) so others could hear their discussion about online harassment, GamerGate, revenge porn -- and what our laws can do about it."

Rudy Rucker's massive volume of journals now out!

Rudy Rucker -- mathematician, cyberpunk, computer scientist, gonzo hoopy frood happy mutant -- has released an 828 page volume of his journals!

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Comics Connector: matching comics professionals with teachers/librarians for visits

Charles from the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund writes, "Comic Book Legal Defense Fund continues the celebration of Children's Book Week by launching its newest resource -- the Comics Connector, a directory that connects educators and librarians with comics professionals who are able to provide classroom/library visits."

50% off O'Reilly books for the International Day Against DRM


O'Reilly is celebrating the International Day Against DRM with a 50% discount on its giant collection of technical books and videos (60% if you spend $100) -- just use discount code "DRM2015"

Kickstarting a second Oh Joy Sex Toy collection


The first collection of the smashing, sex-positive webcomic was such a success, they're doing it again!

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Deep Crossing, a free Adrian Tarn adventure on Kindle

Deep Crossing

Rule breaking adventurer Adrian Tarn is back. In Deep Crossing he trains the new crew of his experimental craft for a deep space mission!

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Locus Award finalists announced


The Locus Award -- nominated and voted by science fiction fans -- has published a particularly fine shortlist this year (in contrast to the hijacked Hugo Award ballot); I'm extremely proud to see my novella The Man Who Sold the Moon from Hieroglyph on the list.

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Tor and Bitlit offer discounted ebooks to print-book owners


Peter writes, "Macmillan has partnered with ebook bundling start-up BitLit to offer readers who own a print edition of Tor/Forge titles the opportunity to download a DRM free ebook edition using the free BitLit app (available for Ios/Android)."

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Marie Antoinette's Watch: Adultery, Larceny, & Perpetual Motion

Unknown John Biggs' book about Marie Antoinette's legendary timepiece is now available. I've been waiting for this for years (but not 200 years.)
Across continents and into and out of the hands of royalty, revolutionaries, smugglers, thieves, and the world’s greatest tech engineers, was Marie Antoinette’s watch, the “160,” worth an estimated $40 million in today’s dollars. Perhaps the most sought after personal technology device of the last 200 years, the timepiece, designed by the legendary Abraham-Louis Breguet, is the launching point for a thrilling and fluidly woven set of narratives that are, in part, forbidden love story, historical document, and police procedural. Marie Antoinette’s Watch also deftly lays out the history of horology and the 18th Century engineering feats attained in Paris’s answer to Silicon Valley, the Île de la Cité, that made the watch the most intricate and prized personal device of its time – something that’s come full circle today. In the hands of Techcrunch’s East Coast Editor, John Biggs, Marie Antoinette’s Watch is by turns edifying and lurid, historical and utterly modern. Culminating in a heist in a Tel Aviv antiquities museum in the 1980s, Biggs tells the story of how one object can transform countries, cultures, high technology, and time itself.

How Daniel Pinkwater writes a blurb

Nick Courage was lucky enough to score a blurb from literature-hero Daniel Pinkwater for his debut novel The Loudness:

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How a WWII unit deceived the enemy with audacious fakery

They jokingly called themselves Cecil B. DeMille Warriors. To others, they were the Ghost Army. To the Army itself, they were the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops. To everyone, they were undoubtedly the most surreal soldiers of WWII.

Created in the summer of 1944, the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops was comprised mainly of artists, engineers, and movie effects technicians. Amongst the unit’s ranks were a young future fashion icon Bill Blass, Color Field painter Ellsworth Kelly, wildlife artist Arthur Singer, and photographer Art Kane. Their top-secret mission sounds like the punchline to some drunken soldier’s joke: to use an inflatable army of tanks, vehicles, sound effects, and other movie trickery to convince the Germany army that there were significant forces where there were none. Well, none other than DeMille’s finest. The unit plied their trade from Normandy to the Rhine.

So, what do you get when you send a lot of nervous artists and creative types off on a dangerous assignment? Lots and lots of art – made in boredom, in fear, and in celebration. The Ghost Army of World War II is a beautifully-produced print documentary of the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops and the role they played in WWII. The book is filled with countless paintings, sketches, cartoons, photos, hand-drawn maps, sketchbook pages, letters and post cards, and the military ephemera of the 23rd. All of these visuals are beautifully animated by the writing of authors Rick Beyer (who also produced a 2005 PBS documentary on the 23rd HST), Elizabeth Sayles (daughter of Ghost Army vet William Sayles), and the amazing stories recounted by the soldiers themselves.

It is unclear the full extent to which the deceptions of the 23rd Headquarters Special Troops changed the outcomes of battles and the course of the war, but there is no doubt that their audacious and dangerous actions saved the lives of thousands in its waning hours.

Note: Our Discordian readers (and fans of sketchy Jim Carrey thrillers) will certainly appreciate the auspicious number of the unit.

Previously on Boing Boing: WWII's "Ghost Army" that tricked German troops with inflatable tanks and sound effects

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Batman comic strips from 1968-1969 newspapers that have never been reprinted until now

There are very few parts of Batman’s print legacy that aren’t readily available to the public. The various runs of newspaper comic strips are finally collected in hardcover form for the hardcore fan in Batman: The Silver Age Newspaper Comics Volume 2 (1968-1969). This great book from IDW gives us a second volume of the 1960s Silver Age comic strips in their original glory. These are strips that you literally couldn’t have seen until now, unless you had saved the original newspapers that they were printed in. The strips are reprinted in their original format, with the Sunday editions in color and the dailies in black and white. The book features all kinds of adventures that you’ve never seen before, including all the characters we love like Batman, Robin, Alfred, Catwoman, Batgirl and more. The occasional other Justice League hero will make an appearance as well, like Aquaman and Superman. This book is a phenomenal addition to the library of any Batman fan. – Matt MacNabb