Boing Boing 

Stephen Harper ready to sign TPP and throw Tory rural base under the bus

The Canadian Prime Minister said he'd only sign the secretive Trans Pacific Partnership if it had safeguards for Canada's farmers, but now that it's clear that he hasn't got a hope in hell of being re-elected, he's ready to sign TPP and damn the farmers.

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'Large face' found in rock cliff on remote Canada island, but where did it come from?

The origin of this "large face" on the side of a cliff remains unknown.

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Memoir of a Mormon missionary expelled from Canada as a terrorist


Science fiction writer William Shunn is at long last releasing his memoir, The Accidental Terrorist, in book form. Revised and expanded from his popular podcast, it tells the story of how he was expelled from Canada for terrorism as a young Mormon missionary.

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Short film: "Denali"

“There's no easy way to say goodbye to a friend, especially when they've supported you through your darkest times.”

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Night Swimming: swinging new album from Halifax's Gypsophilia

I've loved all three of their previous album, but this one's even better -- listen for yourself!

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Hacktivist sees too much, FBI lock him up on child-porn charges, produce no evidence


Matthew DeHart, a veteran from a multi-generational military/intelligence family, ran a Tor hidden service server for his Wow guildies, members of his old army unit, and whistleblowers.

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Stephen Harper extended music copyright to please US record industry lobbyist


Michael Geist writes, "The Canadian government's decision to extend the term of copyright for sound recordings in the budget may have taken most copyright observers by surprise, but not the music industry."

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Lego store detains 11 year old customer, accuses his father of being an unfit parent

Doug Dunlop's 11 year old, Lego-obsessed son is a frequent customer at the Lego store in Calgary's Chinook Mall, where he spends his odd-job savings on new materials -- until this week, when the Lego store management had the mall's security take him into custody.

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School bus driver bans little girl from reading


The school bus driver in St-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec told 8 year old Sarah Auger she wasn't allowed to read on the way to and from school because she might poke herself in the eye with a corner of the book.

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Obituary for an amazing history teacher


Katie sez, "This is an article by a friend of mine about a teacher who passed this week from our high school in Ontario, Canada. This history teacher had the students dig trenches, sleep in cold, wet tents, march and "mow down" other students all in an awesome example of teaching. I had already graduated after the first class did this, but it made headlines every year."

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Canadian Big Content spokesjerk says the public domain is against the public interest

Michael Geist writes, "On World Book and Copyright Day, it is worth noting how Graham Henderson, the President of Music Canada (formerly the Canadian Recording Industry Association) characterized the government's decision to extend the term of copyright in sound recordings and performances:"

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Fascinating, wide-ranging discussion with William Gibson

Fenwick writes, "I had the tremendous opportunity to have a public talk with William Gibson when my university asked if I'd would to do a public talk with a public figure. I had no idea I'd be so lucky as to talk with William Gibson when I agreed. I thought you might be a kick out of our wide-ranging, fun discussion about science fiction and the future."

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Canada's music copyright extension will cost Canadians millions

Michael Geist writes, "Randy Bachman found himself embroiled in a public fight with Prime Minister Stephen Harper last year when Harper used his song 'Takin' Care of Business' as a theme song for a major speech. Bachman said he probably would not have granted permission to use the song, since 'I don't think he's taking care of business for the right people or the right reasons.'"

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Kickstarting a lab where maker-kids produce amazing peer-educational materials


Andy from Steamlabs writes, "We challenged a sixth grade class to make learning about the power grid engaging and they designed a high-tech, science centre style exhibit over a 3 week period."

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Canada's Tories say the government's new slogan is a state secret


Stephen Harper's government has spent millions of tax dollars advertising the upcoming Canada Day celebration with the slogan "Strong, proud, free," which also happens to be awfully close to their election slogan.

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Canadian court hands a gimme to copyright trolls


Michael Geist writes, "Canada's Federal Court has issued its ruling on the costs in the Voltage-TekSavvy case, a case involving the demand for the names and address of thousands of TekSavvy subscribers by Voltage on copyright infringement grounds. Last year, the court opened the door to TekSavvy disclosing the names and addresses, but also established new safeguards against copyright trolling in Canada. The decision required Voltage to pay TekSavvy's costs and builds in court oversight over any demand letters sent by Voltage."

The issue of costs required another hearing with very different views of the costs associated with the case. TekSavvy claimed costs of $346,480.68 (mainly legal fees and technical costs associated with complying with the order), while Voltage argued the actual costs should be $884. The court disagreed with both sides, settling on costs of $21,557.50 or roughly $11 per subscriber name and address. The decision unpacks all the cost claims, but the key finding was that costs related to the initial motion over whether there should be disclosure of subscriber information was separate from the costs of abiding by the order the court ultimately issued. The motion judge did not address costs at the time and the court now says it is too late to address them.

With TekSavvy now bearing all of those motion costs (in addition to costs associated with informing customers), the decision sends a warning signal to ISPs that getting involved in these cases can lead to significant costs that won't be recouped. That is a bad message for privacy. So is the likely outcome for future cases (should they arise) with subscribers left with fewer notices and information from their ISP given the costs involved and the court's decision to not compensate for those costs.

Defending Privacy Doesn’t Pay: Federal Court Issues Ruling in Voltage – TekSavvy Costs [Michael Geist]

Prizewinning frozen hair


Here's photos from the annual Takhini Hot Pools frozen hair competition, where bathers expose their hair to -20'C - -30'C Yukon air to freeze it into amazing ice-sculptures.

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