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Tyrannosaurs ate one another, evidence suggests

150409083201-large Injuries inflicted on a tyrannosaurus in life appear to be inflicted by another tyrannosaurus. But a new research paper reports similar injuries on another t-rex skull inflicted after death, suggesting that tyrannosaurus scavenged its own kind.

There is no evidence that the animal died at the hands (or mouth) of another tyrannosaur. However, the preservation of the skull and other bones, and damage to the jaw bones show that after the specimen began to decay, a large tyrannosaur (possibly of the same species) bit into the animal and presumably ate at least part of it. Combat between large carnivorous dinosaurs is already known and there is already evidence for cannibalism in various groups, including tyrannosaurs. This is however an apparently unique record with evidence of both pre- and post-mortem injuries to a single individual.

The awesome painting of feathery t-rexes vying to devour one another is by Luis Rey.

Eli Roth showed Amazonian villagers Cannibal Holocaust, and they thought it was hilarious!

In one of the most delightfully disturbing stories you will read today, director Eli Roth screened 1980's Cannibal Holocaust for 200 Amazonian villagers who had never seen a movie before. While Roth was scouting for locations for his own cannibal-themed movie, The Green Inferno, he found a remote area with "no electricity, no running water, nothing." As a courtesy, he wanted to give the people living there an idea of what he was going to be doing in their backyard, so he showed them Cannibal Holocaust, and "[t]he villagers thought it was the funniest thing they’d ever seen." So, there's your nervous, cannibalism-related giggle of the day, plus a bonus cannibal cop! (via Movieline)